extent

noun

ex·​tent ik-ˈstent How to pronounce extent (audio)
1
a
: the range over which something extends : scope
the extent of her jurisdiction
b
: the amount of space or surface that something occupies or the distance over which it extends : magnitude
the extent of the forest
c
: the point, degree, or limit to which something extends
using talents to the greatest extent
2
a
: seizure (as of land) in execution of a writ of extent in Great Britain
also : the condition of being so seized
b
: a writ giving to a creditor temporary possession of his debtor's property
3
archaic : valuation (as of land) in Great Britain especially for taxation

Examples of extent in a Sentence

She tried to determine the extent of the damage. the full extent of human knowledge He questions the extent to which these remedies are needed.
Recent Examples on the Web To some extent, running through tires quickly may offset the reduction of damaging emissions that EVs offer. Andrew Stuttaford, National Review, 11 Feb. 2024 Yet, living wills, or advanced directives, which could be considered as taking control of the process to some extent, are generally uncommon or insufficiently detailed, leaving family members with an incredibly difficult choice. Tal Patalon, Forbes, 10 Feb. 2024 The deaths of some high-profile athletes deaths triggered his interest in anti-doping, just as the extent of East Germany’s doping program was being discovered. Les Carpenter, Washington Post, 10 Feb. 2024 Five snaps in a blowout win in Jacksonville was the extent of Banks’ involvement in the 49ers’ offense during his rookie year. Dominic Faria, The Mercury News, 10 Feb. 2024 Distributions made in any calendar year in excess of investment company taxable income and net capital gain are treated as taxable ordinary dividends to the extent of undistributed earnings and profits, and then as a return of capital that reduces the adjusted basis in the shares held. Sacramento Bee, 9 Feb. 2024 To some extent, Ukraine has contributed to its own troubles. Marc Santora, New York Times, 8 Feb. 2024 But no details have been released on the financing, the location of the new ballpark or the extent of the renovations. Mike Hendricks, Kansas City Star, 8 Feb. 2024 In January, Samsung posted its fourth straight quarter of profit decline, underscoring the extent to which its fortunes have waned alongside macroeconomic and demand declines. Yoolim Lee, Fortune Asia, 5 Feb. 2024 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'extent.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Middle English, from Anglo-French estente, extente land valuation, from extendre, estendre to survey, evaluate, literally, to extend

First Known Use

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 3

Time Traveler
The first known use of extent was in the 14th century

Dictionary Entries Near extent

Cite this Entry

“Extent.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/extent. Accessed 21 Feb. 2024.

Kids Definition

extent

noun
ex·​tent ik-ˈstent How to pronounce extent (audio)
1
: the range, distance, or space over or through which something extends
the extent of the Roman empire
2
: the point, degree, or limit to which something extends
the extent of her knowledge

More from Merriam-Webster on extent

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