aggregate

adjective
ag·gre·gate | \ ˈa-gri-gət \

Definition of aggregate 

(Entry 1 of 3)

: formed by the collection of units or particles into a body, mass, or amount : collective: such as

a(1) : clustered in a dense mass or head an aggregate flower

(2) : formed from several separate ovaries of a single flower aggregate fruit

b : composed of mineral crystals of one or more kinds or of mineral rock fragments

c : taking all units as a whole aggregate sales

aggregate

verb
ag·gre·gate | \ ˈa-gri-ˌgāt \
aggregated; aggregating

Definition of aggregate (Entry 2 of 3)

transitive verb

1 : to collect or gather into a mass or whole The census data were aggregated by gender.

2 : to amount to (a whole sum or total) : total audiences aggregating several million people

aggregate

noun
ag·gre·gate | \ ˈa-gri-gət \

Definition of aggregate (Entry 3 of 3)

1 : a mass or body of units or parts somewhat loosely associated with one another Froth is an aggregate of tiny bubbles.

2 : the whole sum or amount : sum total spent an aggregate of 10 million dollars in advertising during the past three years

3a : a rock composed of mineral crystals of one or more kinds or of mineral rock fragments : an aggregate rock

b : any of several hard inert materials (such as sand, gravel, or slag) used for mixing with a cementing material to form concrete, mortar, or plaster

c : a clustered mass of individual soil particles varied in shape, ranging in size from a microscopic granule to a small crumb, and considered the basic structural unit of soil

in the aggregate

: considered as a whole : collectively Dividends for the year amounted in the aggregate to 25 million dollars.

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Other words from aggregate

Adjective

aggregately adverb
aggregateness noun

Did You Know?

Noun

We added "aggregate" to our flock of Latin borrowings in the 15th century. It descends from "aggregare" ("to add to"), a Latin verb made up of the prefix ad- (which means "to," and which usually changes to "ag-" before a "g") and "greg-" or "grex" (meaning "flock"). "Greg-" also gave us "congregate," "gregarious," and "segregate." "Aggregate" is commonly employed in the phrase "in the aggregate," which means "considered as a whole" (as in the sentence "In the aggregate, the student's various achievements were sufficiently impressive to merit a scholarship"). "Aggregate" also has some specialized senses. For example, it is used for a mass of minerals formed into a rock and for a material, such as sand or gravel, used to form concrete, mortar, or plaster.

Examples of aggregate in a Sentence

Adjective

There were to be thirty-seven playgrounds, twenty schools. There were to be a hundred and thirty-three miles of street, paved with an inch and a half of No. 2 macadam on an aggregate base. —Joan Didion, New Yorker, 26 July 1993 Their success at opening up new sources of supply, generating and servicing demand, and connecting new markets with the processing industries of the Amsterdam entrepôt seemed … to belie the axiom of an inelastic aggregate volume of world trade—a zero-sum competition. —Simon Schama, The Embarrassment of Riches, 1988 The mulberry looks a bit like a raspberry. But the raspberry (along with the other brambles, members of the genus Rubus, such as the blackberry) is an aggregate fruit generated by a single, if complex, flower. —Raymond Sokolov, Natural History, October 1986 With Keynes, standard theory conceded that disequilibria might intrude upon the economy as a whole, but it held that these could be remedied by judicious stabilization of aggregate demand—that is, combined government and consumer purchasing power. —Robert Kuttner, Atlantic, February 1985 The university receives more than half its aggregate income from government sources. The team with the highest aggregate score wins.

Verb

The problem, in this case, is that the synergy creates incentives for segregation. Ethnic advertisers scour the TV schedule for shows and channels that "aggregate" viewers of the type the client wants to reach … —Tamar Jacoby, New Republic, 24 Jan. 2000 "We are good at aggregating eyeballs and delivering services," says Barry Schuler, the president of AOL Interactive Services, "and the Time Warner deal is a natural extension of that." —Barry Schuler, Fortune, 7 Feb. 2000 Pollsters, for the most part, know perfectly well what they are doing. One thing they are doing is aggregating and averaging ephemeral spasms of "mood" that may have commercial or political value. —Christopher Hitchens, Harper's, April 1992 … covered only if each of the corporations involved has capital, surplus and undivided profits aggregating more than $10 million … —Joe Sims et al., National Law Journal, 28 Jan. 1991 The Web site aggregates content from many other sites. over time, her petty thefts aggregated a significant shortfall in the company's books

Noun

In particular, a core of popular politically minded blogs known in the aggregate as the Blogosphere has been a beehive of furious activity. Or should I say a wasp's nest? —Steven Levy, Newsweek, 4 Oct. 2004 It's true that our lives are the aggregate of a lot of little things, that's precisely why, at least once a year, we need to ride the wave of something bigger and bolder than our own little humdrum existence. —Will Manley, Booklist, 1 Sept. 2002 Smallness of enterprises, as in the Japanese bicycle-manufacturing development, is an asset because smallness cuts down administrative and other overhead costs both in individual enterprises and in the aggregate, in comparison with the overhead costs of large operations. —Jane Jacobs, Cities and the Wealth of Nations, (1984) 1985 numerous episodes of pilferage, taken in the aggregate, can really add up to a significant sum
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective

They had only got into the UEFA playoffs during qualifying by virtue of having a better goal difference that the Netherlands and then ground out 1-0 aggregate win over Italy. SI.com, "World Cup Preview: Sweden vs Switzerland - Recent Form, Team News, Predictions & More," 2 July 2018 National ads generate more advertising revenue for the networks in aggregate but tend to include a lot of homes the advertiser isn’t trying to reach. Alexandra Bruell, WSJ, "AT&T’s Ambitious Plan to Take On Facebook and Google for Ad Dollars," 15 June 2018 The government’s star witness was Carl Shapiro, an economist at the University of California, who used an economic model to predict that consumer cable bills could rise by $500 million annually in aggregate by 2021. Marcy Gordon, BostonGlobe.com, "AT&T-Time Warner merger approved by federal judge," 12 June 2018 The Census Bureau handed over data, reported in aggregate, on UT graduates’ earnings, region and industry of employment, as well as migration patterns and career pathways. Lindsay Ellis, San Antonio Express-News, "UT releases data on what its grads earn — and what they owe in loans," 26 Mar. 2018 On the night, Liverpool lost 4-2 to Roma, but advanced 7-6 on aggregate to set up a clash with Real Madrid in the May 26 final in Kiev. Hamza Hendawi, The Christian Science Monitor, "How a soccer star gave hope to his Egyptian hometown," 23 May 2018 On the night, Liverpool lost 4-2 to Roma, but advanced 7-6 on aggregate to set up a clash with Real Madrid in the May 26 final in Kiev. Hamza Hendawi, Fox News, "In Salah's Nile delta village, the Egyptian is a super hero," 22 May 2018 Roma's defense, which had been generous to Liverpool over the two legs, again failed to deal with a cross and Wijnaldum nodded the ball past Alisson to give the visitors a commanding aggregate lead. Matias Grez, CNN, "Liverpool see off spirited Roma to reach Champions League final," 2 May 2018 The teams split their four regular-season games — the aggregate score favored the Brigade, 182-159 — and both finished the season 7-5. Jonas Shaffer, baltimoresun.com, "No. 2 seed Brigade open Arena Football League semifinal series at Philadelphia," 13 July 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Individual users could create their own magazines before, but the new feature taps into the idea that people may be more likely to trust a news source—or simply read it—if colleagues are the ones aggregating it. Lauren Goode, WIRED, "Flipboard's Answer to Fake News: More Human Curation," 24 Apr. 2018 There are now dozens of podcasts, websites and social media accounts dedicated to the draft, several others dedicated to aggregating them, and several more focused on critiquing them. Rick Maese, chicagotribune.com, "NFL draft analysis is a cottage industry — and everyone wants to join the neighborhood," 11 Apr. 2018 If the courts force the NYPD to respond substantively to those requests, the responses could be aggregated to analyze the NYPD’s counterterrorism operations. Michael Richter, WSJ, "The Public Has a Right to Know, but There Are Limits," 5 Apr. 2018 NewsPicks, which aggregates business news and allows commenting and sharing, has 64,000 subscribers who pay roughly $15 per month, according to the statement. New York Times, "Quartz, Atlantic Media’s Business News Start-Up, Is Sold to Japanese Firm," 2 July 2018 The onus for this doesn’t primarily lie, as Meryl Streep once claimed (and Kaling referenced), on Rotten Tomatoes, which aggregates reviews. Alissa Wilkinson, Vox, "The real reason we need more diversity in film criticism," 22 June 2018 The $32 million production garnered 36 percent positive reviews, according to RottenTomatoes.com, which aggregates critics’ comments. Anousha Sakoui, Bloomberg.com, "‘A Quiet Place’ Returns to No. 1 in 3rd Week for Paramount," 23 Apr. 2018 Championships are based on year-end aggregated earnings. Melissa Lyttle, Smithsonian, "The First Family of Rodeo," 13 Dec. 2017 The website, which aggregates news articles about vehicle recalls, has launched a tool that allows owners to check their vehicle recall status by vehicle identification number, or VIN. Colin Campbell, baltimoresun.com, "More than 550,000 recalled cars are on Baltimore's roads, new search tool says," 10 May 2017

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

If the aggregate score is tied, the teams would immediately play an overtime period to determine which advances. Jonas Shaffer, baltimoresun.com, "No. 2 seed Brigade open Arena Football League semifinal series at Philadelphia," 13 July 2018 The aggregate score is currently 1-1 as Arsenal travel to Atlético Madrid's Wanda Metropolitano Stadium for the second leg on Thursday. SI.com, "Atlético Madrid vs Arsenal Preview: Previous Encounter, Key Battle, Team News & More," 2 May 2018 That may not mean a lot in the aggregate, but the suspension will hit some insurers, especially small co-ops, hard, and could drive them out of business. Michael Hiltzik, latimes.com, "The Trump administration finds another way to throw sand in Obamacare's gears, at patients' expense," 9 July 2018 That alone can dominate a series, provided that Cleveland gets even occasional stops and pieces together enough scoring in the aggregate to stay afloat. Rob Mahoney, SI.com, "The Long Shadow of LeBron Hangs Over Another Raptors Season," 7 May 2018 This is less than what some economists project at such a low jobless rate, but the aggregate figure may be somewhat depressed by the huge increase in employment among lower-skilled workers. The Editorial Board, WSJ, "The Rising Jobs Tide," 1 June 2018 Most of the gravel, or aggregate, will be delivered through the end of the year, with a peak hauling period lasting about three months this summer and fall, said Adam Jelen, senior vice president with Gilbane Building Co. Rick Romell, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Ready to rumble: 1,000 dump truck loads of gravel a day headed to Foxconn," 31 May 2018 In asphalt operations, the sand and gravel, called aggregate, is heated into a mix with liquid asphalt. Lily Altavena, azcentral, "Controversy in the air as Mesa homeowners decry neighboring asphalt plant’s odors," 11 July 2018 Results are provided to employers only in an aggregate form, removing all information that identifies specific individuals. Johnny C. Taylor Jr., USA TODAY, "Ask HR: My company wants a health risk assessment. What will it be used for?," 10 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'aggregate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of aggregate

Adjective

15th century, in the meaning defined above

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for aggregate

Adjective

Middle English aggregat, borrowed from Latin aggregātus, past participle of aggregāre "to cause to flock together, join, include, lump together," from ad- ad- + -gregāre, verbal derivative of greg-, grex "flock, herd, group" — more at gregarious

Verb

Middle English aggregaten, borrowed from Latin aggregātus, past participle of aggregāre "to cause to flock together, join" — more at aggregate entry 1

Noun

Middle English aggregat, borrowed from Medieval Latin aggregātus, noun derivative of Latin aggregātus, past participle of aggregāre "to cause to flock together, join" — more at aggregate entry 1

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Last Updated

12 Sep 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for aggregate

The first known use of aggregate was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for aggregate

aggregate

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of aggregate

 (Entry 1 of 3)

: formed by adding together two or more amounts

aggregate

verb

English Language Learners Definition of aggregate (Entry 2 of 3)

: to join or combine into a single group

: to equal a specified number or amount

aggregate

noun

English Language Learners Definition of aggregate (Entry 3 of 3)

: a total amount

aggregate

verb
ag·gre·gate | \ ˈa-gri-ˌgāt \
aggregated; aggregating

Kids Definition of aggregate

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to collect or gather into a mass or whole The particles of sand aggregated into giant dunes.

aggregate

noun
ag·gre·gate | \ ˈa-gri-gət \

Kids Definition of aggregate (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a mass or body of units or parts The rock is an aggregate of several minerals.

2 : the whole sum or amount They won by an aggregate of 30 points.

aggregate

adjective
ag·gre·gate | \ ˈag-ri-gət \

Medical Definition of aggregate 

(Entry 1 of 3)

: formed by the collection of units or particles into a body, mass, or amount

Other words from aggregate

aggregation \ˌag-ri-ˈgā-shən \ noun
It is now known that these calcifications represent focal aggregations of calcium hydroxyapatite … Medical Radiography & Photography, 1982

aggregate

transitive verb
ag·gre·gate | \ -ˌgāt \
aggregated; aggregating

Medical Definition of aggregate (Entry 2 of 3)

: to collect or gather into a mass or whole aggregated human albumin

aggregate

noun
ag·gre·gate | \ -gət \

Medical Definition of aggregate (Entry 3 of 3)

: a mass or body of units or parts somewhat loosely associated with one another

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aggregate

adjective
ag·gre·gate | \ ˈa-grə-gət \

Legal Definition of aggregate 

(Entry 1 of 3)

: taken as a total aggregate liability

aggregate

verb
ag·gre·gate | \ ˈa-grə-ˌgāt \
aggregated; aggregating

Legal Definition of aggregate (Entry 2 of 3)

transitive verb

1 : to combine or gather into a whole class members may aggregate their individual claims — compare join

2 : to amount to an award aggregating $100,000

intransitive verb

: to form an aggregate they may not aggregate if their claims are regarded as “separate and distinct” —J. M. Landers et al.

aggregate

noun
ag·gre·gate | \ ˈa-grə-gət \

Legal Definition of aggregate (Entry 3 of 3)

1 : total amount may sue in federal court if the aggregate of the claims exceeds $75,000

2 : a whole made up of individual units the aggregate of operative facts

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