whack

verb
\ ˈ(h)wak How to pronounce whack (audio) \
whacked; whacking; whacks

Definition of whack

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to strike with a smart or resounding blow whack the ball
b : to cut with or as if with a whack : chop
2 chiefly British : to get the better of : defeat
3 slang : murder, kill

intransitive verb

: to strike a smart or resounding blow

whack

noun

Definition of whack (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : a smart or resounding blow also : the sound of or as if of such a blow
b : a critical attack
2 : portion, share
4a : an opportunity or attempt to do something take a whack at it
b : a single action or occasion borrowed $50 all at one whack
out of whack
1 : out of proper order or shape threw his knee out of whack
2 : not in accord feeling out of whack with her contemporaries— S. E. Rubin

Other Words from whack

Verb

whacker noun

Examples of whack in a Sentence

Verb She whacked the piñata with a stick. The old man lifted his cane and whacked the mugger on the head. They were whacking through the jungle with their machetes. He got whacked by mobsters. Noun The pile of books hit the floor with a whack. took a whack at solving the math problem
See More
Recent Examples on the Web: Verb That whack-a-mole strategy has been largely effective. Washington Post, 5 Jan. 2022 That whack-a-mole strategy has been largely effective. Christian Shepherd, Anchorage Daily News, 5 Jan. 2022 To see how out of whack the current environment has become because of inflation, look at the longer-term graph of interest rates vs the CPI annual rate of change (the red, dotted line). John S. Tobey, Forbes, 26 Dec. 2021 Instead Facebook was overrun with anti-vaccine shouting, and the company has been ineffectually playing whack-a-mole against them instead of encouraging vaccination. Ryan Cooper, The Week, 18 Sep. 2021 The puck laid in the slot, where Jeffrey Viel tried to whack it past the Swedish netminder. Union-tribune, San Diego Union-Tribune, 18 Dec. 2021 Tiny girls twirl in fairy costumes before turning to whack their brothers with their wands. Carolyn Wells, Longreads, 15 Dec. 2021 Rather than starting with these larger, more unwieldy conversations about what success in social media reform might look like, policymakers prefer to play whack-a-mole with the latest problematic trends. Jacob Carpenter, Fortune, 9 Dec. 2021 Cerullo owns the Cessna 421 that flies Robert De Niro from Long Island to Philadelphia to whack Jimmy Hoffa in The Irishman. Lane Brown, Vulture, 9 Dec. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Even though some of the worst prior disruptions involving, say, semiconductors and electronics have eased somewhat, new problems are popping up like a giant network of whack-a-moles. The Arizona Republic, 15 Jan. 2022 Again, my own whack-a-doodle thinking is that any person running for office should want as many people as possible to vote. Rex Huppke, chicagotribune.com, 14 Jan. 2022 The result: Sherfield caught a 5-yard slant between cornerback Bashaud Breeland and Smith, who couldn’t dislodge the ball with a mid-catch whack. Eric Branch, San Francisco Chronicle, 30 Nov. 2021 Rather than a prophetic Godardian whack, Jude’s prolific, scattershot quotations deliver a quick sardonic jab. Mark Olsen, Los Angeles Times, 26 Nov. 2021 Naturally, there’s a drink named after Sir Winston, and a good whack of martinis in honor of Fleming’s famous fictional spy; the 007, for instance, pairs Sipsmith VJOP Gin with vermouth and Campari. Rachel Cormack, Robb Report, 18 Nov. 2021 The crowded luxury market is an increasingly hot target for cannabis brands, who are realizing that sales in the category are strong despite — or possibly because of — a global pandemic that has thrown consumer purchasing patterns into whack. Jackie Bryant, Forbes, 1 Nov. 2021 The Chevron exec said supply and demand gets out of whack in commodity markets, noting crude's unprecedented crash below zero in April 2020. Matt Egan, CNN, 29 Oct. 2021 One good whack delivered by, say, a pandemic, and the whole thing seizes up. Ryan Cooper, The Week, 13 Oct. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'whack.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of whack

Verb

1719, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

Noun

1736, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for whack

Verb

probably imitative of the sound of a blow

Learn More About whack

Dictionary Entries Near whack

whabby

whack

whacked-out

See More Nearby Entries 

Statistics for whack

Last Updated

21 Jan 2022

Cite this Entry

“Whack.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/whack. Accessed 24 Jan. 2022.

Style: MLA
MLACheck Mark Icon ChicagoCheck Mark Icon APACheck Mark Icon Merriam-WebsterCheck Mark Icon

More Definitions for whack

whack

verb

English Language Learners Definition of whack

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to hit (someone or something) with great force
: to reduce (something) by a large amount : slash
: to murder or kill (someone)

whack

noun

English Language Learners Definition of whack (Entry 2 of 2)

: the act of hitting someone or something with great force
: the sound made when something is hit hard
: a share or portion of something

whack

verb
\ ˈhwak How to pronounce whack (audio) , ˈwak \
whacked; whacking

Kids Definition of whack

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to hit with a hard noisy blow The batter whacked the ball.

whack

noun

Kids Definition of whack (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a hard noisy blow I gave the ball a whack.
2 : the sound of a hard noisy blow
out of whack
: not in good working order or shape

More from Merriam-Webster on whack

Nglish: Translation of whack for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of whack for Arabic Speakers

WORD OF THE DAY

Test Your Vocabulary

Name that Thing: Flower Edition

True or False

Test your knowledge - and maybe learn something along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Universal Daily Crossword

A daily challenge for crossword fanatics.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!