whack

verb
\ˈhwak, ˈwak\
whacked; whacking; whacks

Definition of whack 

(Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to strike with a smart or resounding blow whack the ball

b : to cut with or as if with a whack : chop

2 chiefly British : to get the better of : defeat

3 slang : murder, kill

intransitive verb

: to strike a smart or resounding blow

whack

noun

Definition of whack (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : a smart or resounding blow also : the sound of or as if of such a blow

b : a critical attack

2 : portion, share

4a : an opportunity or attempt to do something take a whack at it

b : a single action or occasion borrowed $50 all at one whack

out of whack

1 : out of proper order or shape threw his knee out of whack

2 : not in accord feeling out of whack with her contemporaries— S. E. Rubin

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Other Words from whack

Verb

whacker noun

Examples of whack in a Sentence

Verb

She whacked the piñata with a stick. The old man lifted his cane and whacked the mugger on the head. They were whacking through the jungle with their machetes. He got whacked by mobsters.

Noun

The pile of books hit the floor with a whack. took a whack at solving the math problem
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Productive at home Justin Williams whacked Frans Nielsen in the face at 15:55 of the second period, offsetting 30 seconds of a Justin Abdelkader penalty. Helene St. James, Detroit Free Press, "Henrik Zetterberg's milestone highlights Detroit Red Wings' 3-1 win," 24 Feb. 2018 Lovren just whacked a ball into the stands at midfield after a teammate passed it back to him at the spot with England players around. Rory Smith, New York Times, "Croatia Digs Deeper, Burying England’s World Cup Dreams," 12 July 2018 Your prosthetic can have an ax embedded in it, which flips out to whack enemies. Hayden Dingman, PCWorld, "How Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice's grappling hook arm changes Dark Souls-style combat," 12 June 2018 One other thing that will play a role: Elway’s willingness to whack a couple of big-ticket defenders, Aqib Talib and Derek Wolfe, from a tight cap situation. Peter King, SI.com, "The Offseason of Quarterback Movement: Early Guesses on Who Goes Where in Free Agency, Draft," 18 Feb. 2018 Interstate 4 drivers have reported construction-zone incidents in which their cars were skewered by projectiles, bombarded with concrete, doused in oil, submerged in floodwater, broken by potholes and whacked with light poles. Kevin Spear, OrlandoSentinel.com, "I-4 construction nightmares: Drivers seeking payment for car damage face daunting odds," 13 July 2018 Like the West Oak Lane hod carrier who in 1925 whacked his coworker with a bundle of bricks, knocking him through a hole in a roof, 12 feet to the ground below, and into the hereafter. Mike Newall, Philly.com, "Locked away in a closet, Philly's historical homicide files tell the story of a young, cruel city | Mike Newall," 22 June 2018 Many grocers saw their market values get whacked last June when this deal was announced. Sarah Halzack, latimes.com, "Amazon-Whole Foods: A year later, what has changed?," 11 June 2018 But California’s top-two primary is the reason Jones is spending time and probably money whacking on Bailey instead turning his fire on the likely front-runner, appointed incumbent Xavier Becerra, a fellow Democrat. John Wildermuth, San Francisco Chronicle, "Trump’s seriously unpopular in California, even in competitive GOP districts," 1 May 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

But running interference for her husband, David Cross, is like playing whack-a-mole. Lisa Miller, The Cut, "The Weaponized Amber Tamblyn," 8 July 2018 The brunt of Facebook's news vetting in Mexico falls to a small group of third-party fact-checkers, whose job is to play whack-a-mole — debunking one story at a time, with each taking several days to disprove. chicagotribune.com, "Facebook's battle against fake news reaches Mexico ahead of July 1 election," 23 June 2018 But even that seems like fighting for scraps against the forever game of U.S. taxpayer–funded whack-a-mole. Rick Paulas, Longreads, "Sex Workers vs. The Internet," 15 June 2018 In these final weeks, the unpredictability of those races has forced the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, as well as outside groups, to engage in what has amounted to a multi-million-dollar game of whack-a-mole. Maeve Reston, CNN, "How a surge of progressive energy could backfire on Democrats in California," 31 May 2018 Instead of envisioning a world that comes together thanks to a chorus of different voices, the mainstream film industry is playing whack-a-mole on social issues and identities. refinery29.com, "This New Study Proves That Hollywood Does Not Get Intersectionality," 23 May 2018 Parsing all of the lies peddled by the Trump administration is like playing whack-a-mole. Michelle Ruiz, Vogue, "Donald Trump Lied About Stormy Daniels. Why Should We Believe He Isn’t Still Lying?," 3 May 2018 But Arcia got off to a terrible start at the plate this season, began pressing and got completely out-of-whack mechanically at the plate. Tom Haudricourt, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Haudricourt: Brewers looking to go big with Manny Machado, who is an absolutely perfect fit," 13 July 2018 Your emotional nature has been out of whack lately. BostonGlobe.com, "Horoscope," 6 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'whack.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of whack

Verb

1719, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

Noun

1736, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for whack

Verb

probably imitative of the sound of a blow

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Learn More about whack

Dictionary Entries near whack

wha

whaap

whabby

whack

whacked-out

whacking

whacko

Statistics for whack

Last Updated

16 Oct 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for whack

The first known use of whack was in 1719

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More Definitions for whack

whack

verb

English Language Learners Definition of whack

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to hit (someone or something) with great force

: to reduce (something) by a large amount

: to murder or kill (someone)

whack

noun

English Language Learners Definition of whack (Entry 2 of 2)

: the act of hitting someone or something with great force

: the sound made when something is hit hard

: a share or portion of something

whack

verb
\ˈhwak, ˈwak\
whacked; whacking

Kids Definition of whack

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to hit with a hard noisy blow The batter whacked the ball.

whack

noun

Kids Definition of whack (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a hard noisy blow I gave the ball a whack.

2 : the sound of a hard noisy blow

out of whack

: not in good working order or shape

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Comments on whack

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to reject or criticize sharply

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