whack

1 of 2

verb

whacked; whacking; whacks

transitive verb

1
a
: to strike with a smart or resounding blow
whack the ball
b
: to cut with or as if with a whack : chop
2
chiefly British : to get the better of : defeat
3
slang : murder, kill

intransitive verb

: to strike a smart or resounding blow
whacker noun

whack

2 of 2

noun

1
a
: a smart or resounding blow
also : the sound of or as if of such a blow
b
: a critical attack
2
3
4
a
: an opportunity or attempt to do something
take a whack at it
b
: a single action or occasion
borrowed $50 all at one whack
Phrases
out of whack
1
: out of proper order or shape
threw his knee out of whack
2
: not in accord
feeling out of whack with her contemporariesS. E. Rubin

Examples of whack in a Sentence

Verb She whacked the piñata with a stick. The old man lifted his cane and whacked the mugger on the head. They were whacking through the jungle with their machetes. He got whacked by mobsters. Noun The pile of books hit the floor with a whack. took a whack at solving the math problem See More
Recent Examples on the Web
Verb
However, if the answer is wrong, the ball will fall and whack the player into the pool below. Caroline Brew, Variety, 21 Feb. 2024 To restore order, Hale decide Ernest must be reprimanded, first by whacking him with a paddle and then lecturing him to take back control of his home. Daron James, Los Angeles Times, 12 Feb. 2024 Barbashev answered by whacking a rebound through Lyon's legs for his 13th goal. Dana Gauruder, USA TODAY, 28 Jan. 2024 The Wizards whacked the Pistons at LCA, 126-107, on Nov. 27. Detroit Free Press, 27 Jan. 2024 To evaluate performance, each model was packed up, rolled around, whacked with a baseball bat, shoved off a table, and hoisted into a makeshift overhead compartment (if possible). Theresa Holland, Travel + Leisure, 2 Feb. 2024 As TechCrunch notes, the surprise release of the draft rules last month whacked the market; their disappearance accordingly gave a fillip to Tencent and NetEase shares. David Meyer, Fortune, 23 Jan. 2024 Arizona handled the Los Angeles schools; Colorado whacked the Oregon schools; and Utah took care of the Ducks and Beavers, as well. Jon Wilner, The Mercury News, 21 Jan. 2024 For starters, the governor whacks $30 billion off the Legislative Analyst’s Office’s deficit forecast. George Skelton, Los Angeles Times, 11 Jan. 2024
Noun
For Ingram, his balance seems out of whack given the combination of his talent and skill set. Morten Stig Jensen, Forbes, 23 Feb. 2024 Are the gears a little gunky and slow-moving or out of whack? Idaho Statesman, 31 Jan. 2024 The findings don’t explain why that immune response is out of whack, and need confirming in larger studies. Lisa Jarvis, Twin Cities, 28 Jan. 2024 Here’s your comprehensive guide to discharge—and what to do if something is out of whack. Mara Santilli, SELF, 26 Jan. 2024 When the balance is out of whack, problems surface, including inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, and celiac disease. Bryant Stamford, The Courier-Journal, 18 Jan. 2024 Maryland legislators also took a whack at preventing spam phone calls. Michael Brice-Saddler, Washington Post, 31 Dec. 2023 Three years after Lenovo took its first whack at the foldable PC with the ThinkPad X1 Fold, companies are better positioned to improve on the foldable form factor. Scharon Harding, Ars Technica, 14 Sep. 2023 The Wolverines' rotations without the ball got entirely out of whack in the second half. Tony Garcia, Detroit Free Press, 5 Jan. 2024 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'whack.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Verb

probably imitative of the sound of a blow

First Known Use

Verb

1719, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

Noun

1736, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Time Traveler
The first known use of whack was in 1719

Dictionary Entries Near whack

Cite this Entry

“Whack.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/whack. Accessed 4 Mar. 2024.

Kids Definition

whack

1 of 2 verb
ˈhwak How to pronounce whack (audio)
ˈwak
: to hit or cut with a hard noisy blow
whacked the ball into left field
whacker noun

whack

2 of 2 noun
1
: a hard noisy blow
also : its sound
2
: try entry 2, attempt
take a whack at it

More from Merriam-Webster on whack

Last Updated: - Updated example sentences
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