bat

1 of 5

noun (1)

1
: a stout solid stick : club
2
: a sharp blow : stroke
3
a
: a usually wooden implement used for hitting the ball in various games
b
: a paddle used in various games (such as table tennis)
c
: the short whip used by a jockey
4
a
: batsman, batter
a right-handed bat
b
: a turn at batting
usually used in the phrase at bat
c
: hitting ability
we need his bat in the lineup
5
: batt
6
British : rate of speed : gait
7
: a drinking spree : binge

bat

2 of 5

verb (1)

batted; batting

transitive verb

1
: to strike or hit with or as if with a bat
2
a
: to advance (a base runner) by batting
b
: to have a batting average of
3
: to discuss at length : consider in detail

intransitive verb

1
a
: to strike or hit a ball with a bat
b
: to take one's turn at bat
2
: to wander aimlessly

bat

3 of 5

noun (2)

plural bats
: any of a widely distributed order (Chiroptera) of nocturnal usually frugivorous or insectivorous flying mammals that have wings formed from four elongated digits of the forelimb covered by a cutaneous membrane and that have adequate visual capabilities but often rely on echolocation

see also bats in the belfry

bat

4 of 5

verb (2)

batted; batting

transitive verb

: to wink especially in surprise or emotion
never batted an eye
also : flutter
batted his eyelashes

BAT

5 of 5

abbreviation

bachelor of arts in teaching
Phrases
off one's own bat
chiefly British : through one's own efforts
off the bat
: without delay : immediately
recognized him right off the bat

Examples of bat in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web
Verb
As a team, Hercules is batting .398 and has an on-base percentage of .580. Joseph Dycus, The Mercury News, 29 Mar. 2024 To put this into context: Mizrahi is still positively batting away brands clamouring to kit the Brit out for her Vegas residency. Alice Newbold, Vogue, 27 Mar. 2024 Seal pups, inquisitive and playful, are especially drawn to ocean debris, often getting entangled after batting it about. Cara Buckley, New York Times, 26 Mar. 2024 To put this into context: Mizrahi is still positively batting away brands clamoring to kit out the Brit for her Vegas residency. Alice Newbold, Glamour, 25 Mar. 2024 Stovall, a junior from Haughton, La., has played the past seven games and is batting .321 with 2 home runs, 1 double and 9 runs batted in going into the No. 1 Razorbacks' series at No. 24 Auburn that opens at 6 tonight at Plainsman Park in Auburn, Ala. Bob Holt, arkansasonline.com, 21 Mar. 2024 She oozed juice: strutting, vamping, batting her inch-long eyelash extensions, bullying her way to rebounds or tough baskets. Louisa Thomas, The New Yorker, 16 Mar. 2024 In the book, Block reveals how, again and again in the months after the November 2020 election, he was tasked by Trump’s campaign with batting down implausible and inaccurate allegations that Joe Biden had won the election through fraud. Josh Dawsey, Washington Post, 10 Mar. 2024 In 24 games from May 10 to June 10, briefly interrupted by a bruised heel, Conforto slugged eight of his eventual 15 home runs, batting .333 with a 1.045 OPS. Evan Webeck, The Mercury News, 16 Mar. 2024
Noun
Pro sports prioritize grip strength training for obvious reasons (such as gripping a bat or a ball), but it’s seldom considered a staple in general fitness programs. Dana Santas, CNN, 1 Apr. 2024 The future contract that some speculate will exceed Aaron Judge’s $360 million pact, will be mostly because of his bat and not necessarily his glove though in the season opener for the Yankees, the defense shone through in a big way. Larry Fleisher, Forbes, 28 Mar. 2024 Most are in their 20s and 30s, and some are still learning the basics of throwing, catching and swinging a bat. Jack Nicas Dado Galdieri, New York Times, 28 Mar. 2024 Girls were watching a movie when chaos erupted At a separate location, three girls were attacked with a softball bat, according to Hanley. Minyvonne Burke, NBC News, 28 Mar. 2024 The night an ocean away from San Diego, though, belonged to the bats. Bryce Miller, San Diego Union-Tribune, 21 Mar. 2024 The front of Doby's medal depicts him with a bat across his shoulder. Detroit Free Press, 17 Mar. 2024 Today, watching a cloud of 1.5 million bats wake up and leave to go hunting at dusk is a major tourist attraction for the city. Tove Danovich, The Atlantic, 15 Mar. 2024 Well besides us and a few other mammals, like dolphins and bats, amongst the other vertebrate lineages, only birds have species that evolved vocal learning. Nicholas Stfleur, STAT, 15 Mar. 2024

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'bat.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Noun (1)

Middle English, from Old English batt

Noun (2)

probably alteration of Middle English bakke, of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Swedish nattbakka bat

Verb (2)

probably alteration of bate entry 2

First Known Use

Noun (1)

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb (1)

13th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Noun (2)

1580, in the meaning defined above

Verb (2)

circa 1787, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of bat was before the 12th century

Dictionary Entries Near bat

Cite this Entry

“Bat.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/bat. Accessed 16 Apr. 2024.

Kids Definition

bat

1 of 4 noun
1
: a stout solid stick : club
2
: a sharp blow
3
: a usually wooden implement used for hitting the ball in various games (as baseball)
4
: a turn at batting
next at bat

bat

2 of 4 verb
batted; batting
1
: to strike or hit with or as if with a bat
2
: to take one's turn at bat in baseball
3
: to have a batting average of
is batting .300

bat

3 of 4 noun
: any of an order of night-flying mammals with the forelimbs modified to form wings

bat

4 of 4 verb
batted; batting
: to wink especially in surprise or emotion
never batted an eye
Etymology

Noun

Old English batt "club"

Noun

from Middle English bakke "flying bat"; probably of Scandinavian origin

Verb

probably an altered form of earlier bate "to beat the wings in an impatient manner"

Medical Definition

bat

noun
: any of an order (Chiroptera) of nocturnal placental flying mammals with forelimbs modified to form wings

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