stroke

verb (1)
\ ˈstrōk How to pronounce stroke (audio) \
stroked; stroking

Definition of stroke

 (Entry 1 of 3)

transitive verb

1 : to rub gently in one direction also : caress
2 : to flatter or pay attention to in a manner designed to reassure or persuade

stroke

noun

Definition of stroke (Entry 2 of 3)

1 : the act of striking especially : a blow with a weapon or implement
2 : a single unbroken movement especially : one of a series of repeated or to-and-fro movements
3a : a controlled swing intended to hit a ball or shuttlecock also : a striking of the ball
b : such a stroke charged to a player as a unit of scoring in golf
4a : a sudden action or process producing an impact a stroke of lightning
b : an unexpected result a stroke of luck the idea was a stroke of inspiration a master stroke of diplomacy
5 : sudden impairment or loss of consciousness, sensation, and voluntary motion that is caused by rupture or obstruction (as by a clot) of a blood vessel supplying the brain, and is accompanied by permanent damage of brain tissue

Note: Symptoms of stroke include numbness or weakness on one side of the body or face, confusion, impaired speech or vision, loss of coordination or balance, trouble walking, or severe headache.

called also apoplexy, brain attack, cerebrovascular accident

— compare ischemic stroke, hemorrhagic stroke, transient ischemic attack
6a : one of a series of propelling beats or movements against a resisting medium a stroke of the oar
b : a rower who sets the pace for a crew
7a : a vigorous or energetic effort by which something is done, produced, or accomplished a stroke of genius a brilliant diplomatic stroke
b : a delicate or clever touch in a narrative, description, or construction
8 : heartbeat
9 : the movement in either direction of a mechanical part (such as a piston) having a reciprocating motion also : the distance of such movement
10 : the sound of a bell being struck at the stroke of twelve also : the specific time indicated by or as if by such a sound
11 [stroke entry 1] : an act of stroking or caressing
12a : a mark or dash made by a single movement of an implement
b : one of the lines of a letter of the alphabet
at a stroke
: all at once spent her savings at a stroke

stroke

verb (2)
stroked; stroking

Definition of stroke (Entry 3 of 3)

transitive verb

1a : to mark with a short line stroke the t's
b : to cancel by drawing a line through stroked out his name
2 : to set the stroke for (a rowing crew) also : to set the stroke for the crew of (a rowing boat)
3 sports : to hit, kick, or shoot (a ball) with a smooth movement stroke a putt stroked a single to left field

intransitive verb

1 : to execute a stroke
2 : to row at a certain number of strokes a minute

Other Words from stroke

Verb (1)

stroker noun

Examples of stroke in a Sentence

Noun He had a stroke last winter. She has a strong backhand stroke. He is ahead by two strokes. She swims with long, smooth strokes. the stroke of an oar She knows the four basic strokes. See More
Recent Examples on the Web: Verb More than 1 million Americans have their first heart attack or stroke each year, statistics from the American Heart Association show. Isabella Cueto, STAT, 29 Apr. 2022 In major new guidance, an influential physician task force no longer recommends daily aspirin to prevent a first heart attack or stroke among people 60 and older. Bydr. Chineze Akusoba, ABC News, 26 Apr. 2022 All participants were free of cancer, coronary heart disease and stroke at the start of the studies and completed dietary questionnaires every four years over a 30-year period. Sandee Lamotte, CNN, 30 Mar. 2022 Los Angeles residents have received warnings about the health risks of wildfire smoke, which can cause lung damage and worsen cardiovascular problems like heart disease and stroke with heavy or long-term exposure. Kyla Thomas, The Conversation, 14 Dec. 2021 By either metric, AMR would have been a leading cause of death in 2019, the researchers said, ranking third (after ischaemic heart disease and stroke) for associated deaths and 12th for deaths in which resistance was directly responsible. Robert Hart, Forbes, 20 Jan. 2022 Either way, none of these ladies are throwing out their stilettos to stroke egos. Essence, 7 Dec. 2021 Being female and having a relatively high HDL level are protective; however, depending on your blood pressure reading, your risk of having a heart attack or stroke in the next 10 years is between 20% and 30%. Dr. Keith Roach, oregonlive, 30 Dec. 2021 To keep the economy running, China must stroke its neighbors rather than slap them. Walter Russell Mead, WSJ, 11 Oct. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun In a study of more than 5,000 postmenopausal women, those with breast arterial calcification (BAC) were 51 percent more likely to develop heart disease or have a stroke compared with women who didn’t have the condition. Scott Lafee, San Diego Union-Tribune, 3 May 2022 Those who had recovered from COVID-19 were 52% more likely to have a stroke and 72% more likely to experience heart failure, compared to a control group. Carolyn Barber, Fortune, 19 Apr. 2022 At age 8, his father had a stroke and died at age 51. Phoebe Wall Howard, Detroit Free Press, 9 Apr. 2022 When compared with millions of other patients who were never infected, Covid survivors were 63 percent more likely to have a heart attack and 52 percent more likely to have a stroke. New York Times, 9 Apr. 2022 But LeSane, who has been serving as Richard William’s spokesman since his 80-year-old father had a stroke, declined to go beyond his statement when asked for comment on Smith’s Oscar acceptance speech. NBC News, 28 Mar. 2022 In the meantime, many home buyers feel like their last hope is a stroke of luck. New York Times, 23 Apr. 2022 The cause was a stroke, said a son, Byron Sullivan. Washington Post, 9 Apr. 2022 And to come up with it in the first place was a stroke of genius. Maureen Lee Lenker, EW.com, 2 Apr. 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'stroke.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of stroke

Verb (1)

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb (2)

1597, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

History and Etymology for stroke

Verb (1)

Middle English, from Old English strācian; akin to Old High German strīhhan to stroke — more at strike

Noun

Middle English; akin to Old English strīcan to stroke — more at strike

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Time Traveler for stroke

Time Traveler

The first known use of stroke was before the 12th century

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Dictionary Entries Near stroke

strohfiedel

stroke

stroke function

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Statistics for stroke

Last Updated

10 May 2022

Cite this Entry

“Stroke.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/stroke. Accessed 17 May. 2022.

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More Definitions for stroke

stroke

verb
\ ˈstrōk How to pronounce stroke (audio) \
stroked; stroking

Kids Definition of stroke

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to rub gently in one direction I stroked the dog's head.

stroke

noun

Kids Definition of stroke (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : the act of striking : blow the stroke of a whip
2 : one of a series of repeated movements (as in swimming or rowing)
3 : a sudden serious illness caused by the breaking or blocking of an artery in the brain
4 : the sound of striking (as of a clock or bell) the stroke of midnight
5 : the hitting of a ball in a game (as golf or tennis)
6 : a sudden or unexpected example a stroke of luck
7 : a single movement or the mark made by a single movement of a brush, pen, or tool
8 : a sudden action or process that results in something being struck a stroke of lightning
9 : effort by which something is done or the results of such effort It was a stroke of genius.

stroke

noun
\ ˈstrōk How to pronounce stroke (audio) \

Medical Definition of stroke

: sudden impairment or loss of consciousness, sensation, and voluntary motion that is caused by rupture or obstruction (as by a clot) of a blood vessel supplying the brain and is accompanied by permanent damage of brain tissue

Note: Symptoms of stroke include numbness or weakness on one side of the body or face, confusion, impaired speech or vision, loss of coordination or balance, trouble walking, or severe headache. The most common type of stroke, ischemic stroke, results from a narrowed or blocked blood vessel, while hemorrhagic stroke results from a ruptured blood vessel. A very brief interruption of blood supply to the brain usually without lasting effects is called a ministroke or a transient ischemic attack.

… people at risk for stroke should be evaluated for surgery to open up blockages in the arteries of the neck.— Jay Siwek, The Washington Post Partial paralysis and speech difficulties often follow these strokes.— Bruce Bower, Science News stroke survivors

called also apoplexy, brain attack, cerebral accident, cerebrovascular accident

More from Merriam-Webster on stroke

Nglish: Translation of stroke for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of stroke for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about stroke

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