stroke

verb (1)
\ ˈstrōk How to pronounce stroke (audio) \
stroked; stroking

Definition of stroke

 (Entry 1 of 3)

transitive verb

1 : to rub gently in one direction also : caress
2 : to flatter or pay attention to in a manner designed to reassure or persuade

stroke

noun

Definition of stroke (Entry 2 of 3)

1 : the act of striking especially : a blow with a weapon or implement
2 : a single unbroken movement especially : one of a series of repeated or to-and-fro movements
3a : a controlled swing intended to hit a ball or shuttlecock also : a striking of the ball
b : such a stroke charged to a player as a unit of scoring in golf
4a : a sudden action or process producing an impact a stroke of lightning
b : an unexpected result a stroke of luck the idea was a stroke of inspiration a master stroke of diplomacy
5 : sudden impairment or loss of consciousness, sensation, and voluntary motion that is caused by rupture or obstruction (as by a clot) of a blood vessel supplying the brain, and is accompanied by permanent damage of brain tissue

Note: Symptoms of stroke include numbness or weakness on one side of the body or face, confusion, impaired speech or vision, loss of coordination or balance, trouble walking, or severe headache.

called also apoplexy, brain attack, cerebrovascular accident

— compare ischemic stroke, hemorrhagic stroke, transient ischemic attack
6a : one of a series of propelling beats or movements against a resisting medium a stroke of the oar
b : a rower who sets the pace for a crew
7a : a vigorous or energetic effort by which something is done, produced, or accomplished a stroke of genius a brilliant diplomatic stroke
b : a delicate or clever touch in a narrative, description, or construction
8 : heartbeat
9 : the movement in either direction of a mechanical part (such as a piston) having a reciprocating motion also : the distance of such movement
10 : the sound of a bell being struck at the stroke of twelve also : the specific time indicated by or as if by such a sound
11 [stroke entry 1] : an act of stroking or caressing
12a : a mark or dash made by a single movement of an implement
b : one of the lines of a letter of the alphabet
at a stroke
: all at once spent her savings at a stroke

stroke

verb (2)
stroked; stroking

Definition of stroke (Entry 3 of 3)

transitive verb

1a : to mark with a short line stroke the t's
b : to cancel by drawing a line through stroked out his name
2 : to set the stroke for (a rowing crew) also : to set the stroke for the crew of (a rowing boat)
3 sports : to hit, kick, or shoot (a ball) with a smooth movement stroke a putt stroked a single to left field

intransitive verb

1 : to execute a stroke
2 : to row at a certain number of strokes a minute

Keep scrolling for more

Other Words from stroke

Verb (1)

stroker noun

Examples of stroke in a Sentence

Noun He had a stroke last winter. She has a strong backhand stroke. He is ahead by two strokes. She swims with long, smooth strokes. the stroke of an oar She knows the four basic strokes.
See More
Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Then, stroke the middle of the lashes with a little less pressure than at the base. Sara Miranda, Allure, "Meet the $19 Heated Eyelash Tool That Lifts, Curls, and Separates," 24 Apr. 2021 Those drugs may also increase the risk of heart attack and stroke somewhat. Matthew Herper, STAT, "Why would a Covid vaccine cause rare blood clots? Researchers have found clues," 13 Apr. 2021 If her starters aren’t hitting, VanDerveer has tons of other options, including a 6-foot-5 post who can stroke it from beyond the arc. Lindsay Schnell, USA TODAY, "Analysis: Stanford's calm, depth big reason why Cardinal are capable of winning women's NCAA Tournament," 31 Mar. 2021 The sumi artist must make each brush stroke with all due deliberation, as the nature of the medium precludes the possibility of reworking even a single line. Margalit Fox, New York Times, "Toko Shinoda Dies at 107; Fused Calligraphy With Abstract Expressionism," 3 Mar. 2021 That could lead to a range of issues, from brain fog to stroke. NBC News, "What brains could teach scientists about the lasting effects of Covid-19," 2 Mar. 2021 And Brown himself has demonstrated an ability to stroke it from deep with 28 3s on the season. Nick Moyle, San Antonio Express-News, "Shaka Smart focuses on improving shot selection ahead of Texas' matchup with Iowa State," 1 Mar. 2021 Diabetes is a major cause of blindness, kidney failure, heart attacks, stroke and lower limb amputation. Sandee Lamotte, CNN, "Key 2020 health stories you may have missed because of Covid-19," 28 Dec. 2020 This is not some vanity exercise for Reich and the Colts to stroke their own genius. Jim Ayello, The Indianapolis Star, "Colts' Reich on Jacoby Brissett package: 'Who says starting QB has to play every play?'," 28 Nov. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Damian Lillard found his shooting stroke from deep last week connecting on 43.6 percent of his 10 attempts. Joe Freeman, oregonlive, "NBA power rankings: Portland Trail Blazers hover around No. 10 after resurgent week," 4 May 2021 In one haunting scene after her stroke, Soonja accidentally causes a major fire on her daughter and son-in-law’s property. NBC News, "'K-Grandma' Youn Yuh-jung is just not that into Hollywood," 27 Apr. 2021 But the facts from a world running over with data suggest something happened to his power stroke after a spring that included six rocket launches and the first series of the year, at Kansas City. Evan Grant, Dallas News, "When will Joey Gallo’s power return? His unusual extra-base drought is an unsolved mystery for Rangers," 25 Apr. 2021 Meat Loaf told Rolling Stone Steinman was slated to be involved in Bat Out of Hell III before his 2004 stroke. Justin Curto, Vulture, "Meat Loaf on Late Songwriter Jim Steinman: ‘We Belonged Heart and Soul to Each Other’," 23 Apr. 2021 Hopefully, Mills will find a way to recover his shooting stroke. Jeff Mcdonald, San Antonio Express-News, "The triple take: Heat 107, Spurs 87," 21 Apr. 2021 After struggling from the perimeter for most of the season, Mobley even found his stroke from three-point range late in the season, knocking down nine of 11 over a four-game stretch from the start of the Pac-12 tournament. Ryan Kartje, Los Angeles Times, "USC forward Isaiah Mobley to test NBA draft waters," 17 Apr. 2021 Numbers aren’t necessarily everything in exhibition games, but Hoerner clearly displayed a better approach and swing to complement his power stroke. Meghan Montemurro, chicagotribune.com, "Nico Hoerner is optioned to the minors, while the Chicago Cubs reassign Pedro Strop and Shelby Miller to minor-league camp," 27 Mar. 2021 Her stroke and Cubaj's muscle and rangy defense had Georgia Tech up by 17 after three quarters. Jim Vertuno, ajc, "No rally needed: Georgia Tech rolls over WVU 73-56 in NCAAs," 24 Mar. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'stroke.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of stroke

Verb (1)

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb (2)

1597, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

History and Etymology for stroke

Verb (1)

Middle English, from Old English strācian; akin to Old High German strīhhan to stroke — more at strike

Noun

Middle English; akin to Old English strīcan to stroke — more at strike

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about stroke

Time Traveler for stroke

Time Traveler

The first known use of stroke was before the 12th century

See more words from the same century

Statistics for stroke

Last Updated

10 May 2021

Cite this Entry

“Stroke.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/stroke. Accessed 12 May. 2021.

Style: MLA
MLACheck Mark Icon ChicagoCheck Mark Icon APACheck Mark Icon Merriam-WebsterCheck Mark Icon

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for stroke

stroke

noun

English Language Learners Definition of stroke

medical : a serious illness caused when a blood vessel in your brain suddenly breaks or is blocked
: an act of hitting a ball or the movement made to hit a ball during a game
golf : an act of hitting the ball that is counted as part of a player's score

stroke

verb
\ ˈstrōk How to pronounce stroke (audio) \
stroked; stroking

Kids Definition of stroke

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to rub gently in one direction I stroked the dog's head.

stroke

noun

Kids Definition of stroke (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : the act of striking : blow the stroke of a whip
2 : one of a series of repeated movements (as in swimming or rowing)
3 : a sudden serious illness caused by the breaking or blocking of an artery in the brain
4 : the sound of striking (as of a clock or bell) the stroke of midnight
5 : the hitting of a ball in a game (as golf or tennis)
6 : a sudden or unexpected example a stroke of luck
7 : a single movement or the mark made by a single movement of a brush, pen, or tool
8 : a sudden action or process that results in something being struck a stroke of lightning
9 : effort by which something is done or the results of such effort It was a stroke of genius.

stroke

noun
\ ˈstrōk How to pronounce stroke (audio) \

Medical Definition of stroke

: sudden impairment or loss of consciousness, sensation, and voluntary motion that is caused by rupture or obstruction (as by a clot) of a blood vessel supplying the brain and is accompanied by permanent damage of brain tissue

Note: Symptoms of stroke include numbness or weakness on one side of the body or face, confusion, impaired speech or vision, loss of coordination or balance, trouble walking, or severe headache. The most common type of stroke, ischemic stroke, results from a narrowed or blocked blood vessel, while hemorrhagic stroke results from a ruptured blood vessel. A very brief interruption of blood supply to the brain usually without lasting effects is called a ministroke or a transient ischemic attack.

… people at risk for stroke should be evaluated for surgery to open up blockages in the arteries of the neck.— Jay Siwek, The Washington Post, 22 June 1999 Partial paralysis and speech difficulties often follow these strokes.— Bruce Bower, Science News, 25 Feb. 1984 stroke survivors

called also apoplexy, brain attack, cerebral accident, cerebrovascular accident

Comments on stroke

What made you want to look up stroke? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

Test Your Vocabulary

Star Wars Words Quiz

  • cu jedi training
  • The bounty portion of bounty hunters (such as Boba Fett) comes from a Latin word meaning
Spell It

Can you spell these 10 commonly misspelled words?

TAKE THE QUIZ
Typeshift

Anagram puzzles meet word search.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!