condition

noun
con·​di·​tion | \kən-ˈdi-shən \

Definition of condition 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1a : a premise upon which the fulfillment of an agreement depends : stipulation

b obsolete : covenant

c : a provision making the effect of a legal instrument contingent upon an uncertain event must meet the terms and conditions of the contract also : the event itself

2 : something essential to the appearance or occurrence of something else : prerequisite: such as

a : an environmental requirement Available oxygen is an essential condition for animal life.

b : the clause of a conditional sentence

3a : a restricting or modifying factor : qualification

b : an unsatisfactory academic grade that may be raised by doing additional work

4a : a state of being the human condition

b : social status : rank

c : a usually defective state of health a serious heart condition

d : a state of physical fitness or readiness for use The car was in good condition. exercising to get into condition

e conditions plural : attendant circumstances poor living conditions safe working conditions

5a obsolete : temper of mind

b obsolete : trait

c conditions plural, archaic : manners, ways

condition

verb
conditioned; conditioning\kən-​ˈdi-​sh(ə-​)niŋ \

Definition of condition (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

archaic : to make stipulations

transitive verb

1 : to agree by stipulating

2 : to make conditional

3a : to put into a proper state for work or use

b : air-condition

4 : to give a grade of condition to

5a : to adapt, modify, or mold so as to conform to an environing culture traditional beliefs conditioning a child's attitude

b : to modify so that an act or response previously associated with one stimulus becomes associated with another

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Other Words from condition

Verb

conditionable \kən-​ˈdi-​sh(ə-​)nə-​bəl \ adjective

Synonyms & Antonyms for condition

Synonyms: Noun

estate, fettle, form, health, keeping, kilter, nick [British], order, repair, shape, trim

Synonyms: Verb

season, train

Antonyms: Verb

decondition

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Examples of condition in a Sentence

Noun

Happiness is the state or condition of being happy. Their weakened condition makes them more likely to get sick.

Verb

the length of time that it takes for runners to condition their bodies for a marathon an immigrant family that must condition its traditional attitudes regarding child rearing to the realities of modern American life
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

One condition of these waivers is budget neutrality. Dylan Scott, Vox, "We have a new worst-case scenario for Obamacare," 3 Dec. 2018 As the economy and the nation’s fiscal condition deteriorated, Mr. Bush abandoned the no-tax-hike pledge and signed a tax-raising measure. Gerald F. Seib, WSJ, "George H.W. Bush, America’s 41st President and Father of 43rd, Dies," 1 Dec. 2018 Like Bordeaux, most of the world's major wine regions are on, or near, bodies of water (the cool breezes and moderate climates make for ideal grape-growing conditions). Krisanne Fordham, Condé Nast Traveler, "Wine Cruises Might Be the Best Way to See Wine Country," 28 Nov. 2018 Year on year, in the U.S. and across the globe, staff from fulfillment centers to big-chain stores have staged walk-outs to campaign for better working conditions and wages over the peak period. Rebekka Ayres, Teen Vogue, "Black Friday, Explained: A Complete History," 23 Nov. 2018 But where the house truly impressed was its detail and condition. Robert Khederian, Curbed, "How a fashion designer transformed an 18th-century home into a dreamy inn," 21 Nov. 2018 Hyaluronic acid holds 1,000 times its weight in water, which helps seal in moisture and provide extra protection in dehydrating conditions like sun, altitude, and airplane cabins. Jenna Rennert, Vogue, "6 Celebrity Facialists Share Their Favorite Airplane Beauty Staples," 17 Nov. 2018 In our testing, the images were excellent even in low light conditions. Alexandria Haslam, PCWorld, "Step up your fashion sense with the Amazon Echo Look for 50% off," 6 Nov. 2018 Some of it was still visible, but in terrible condition and not in our palette. Kathleen Renda, House Beautiful, "This House Will Give You Wes Anderson Vibes," 5 Oct. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

We’ve been conditioned to believe that grief is a bad word and something to be avoided. Melissa Blake, Glamour, "To Cope with My Father's Suicide, I Had to Learn to Love My Grief," 17 Nov. 2018 They were conditioned and moisturized, but not wet or sticky. Jenna Rosenstein, Harper's BAZAAR, "I Tried The Easy (and Longer Lasting) Alternative to Fake Lashes," 9 Oct. 2018 Then comes the most important step: conditioning the bales. Jenae Sitzes, Country Living, "Here's Why You Should Be Adding Straw Bales to Your Garden," 8 Mar. 2017 The audience mostly drank water, because the temperature was 105 degrees and the tent wasn’t air-conditioned. Fortune, "Rare Wines and Camels — Just Some of the Offerings at This Year's Auction Napa Valley," 26 May 2018 Fans and even journalists are conditioned to think that all conversations between free agents and officials from NBA teams are geared toward coming to an agreement. Josh Robbins, OrlandoSentinel.com, "Magic Mailbag: What’s the deal with Orlando’s point guard situation?," 12 July 2018 Those football players not doing a second sport can get in the weight room and work to get stronger and better conditioned. Richard Obert, azcentral, "Brophy Prep coach Jon Kitna might join Mike Martz on Alliance of American Football's San Diego team," 6 June 2018 What Lukas could say: Justify is fast and powerful and well conditioned. Jonas Shaffer, baltimoresun.com, "Justify is the early favorite in the Preakness, but he's also far from a sure thing," 12 May 2018 Introduction to fundamental poses that tone, strengthen and condition the body. Milwaukee, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Tennis, yoga, barre and more offered by Oconomowoc Recreation Department," 24 Apr. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'condition.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of condition

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

History and Etymology for condition

Noun

Middle English condicion, from Anglo-French, from Latin condicion-, condicio terms of agreement, condition, from condicere to agree, from com- + dicere to say, determine — more at diction

Verb

see condition entry 1

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Statistics for condition

Last Updated

6 Dec 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for condition

The first known use of condition was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for condition

condition

noun

English Language Learners Definition of condition

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a way of living or existing

: the state in which something exists : the physical state of something

: the physical or mental state of a person or animal

condition

verb

English Language Learners Definition of condition (Entry 2 of 2)

: to train or influence (a person or an animal) to do something or to think or behave in a certain way because of a repeated experience

: to make (something, such as hair or leather) softer and less dry by applying a liquid

condition

noun
con·​di·​tion | \kən-ˈdi-shən \

Kids Definition of condition

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : state of physical fitness or readiness for use The car was in good condition.

2 : something agreed upon or necessary if some other thing is to take place You can come on the condition that you behave.

3 conditions plural : the way things are at a certain time or in a certain place His body had adjusted … to the heat and harsh conditions.— Louis Sachar, Holes

4 : state of being water in a frozen condition

5 : situation in life people of humble condition

condition

verb
conditioned; conditioning

Kids Definition of condition (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to put into the proper or desired state

2 : to change the habits of usually by training

condition

noun
con·​di·​tion | \kən-ˈdish-ən \

Medical Definition of condition 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1 : something essential to the appearance or occurrence of something else especially : an environmental requirement available oxygen is an essential condition for animal life

2a : a usually defective state of health a serious heart condition

b : a state of physical fitness exercising to get into condition

condition

transitive verb
conditioned; conditioning\-​ˈdish-​(ə-​)niŋ \

Medical Definition of condition (Entry 2 of 2)

: to cause to undergo a change so that an act or response previously associated with one stimulus becomes associated with another

Other Words from condition

conditionable \-​(ə-​)nə-​bəl \ adjective

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condition

noun
con·​di·​tion

Legal Definition of condition 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1 : an uncertain future act or event whose occurrence or nonoccurrence determines the rights or obligations of a party under a legal instrument and especially a contract also : a clause in the instrument describing the act or event and its effect

concurrent condition

: a condition that is to be fulfilled by one party at the same time that a mutual condition is to be fulfilled by another party

condition implied in law

: constructive condition in this entry

condition precedent \-​pri-​ˈsēd-​ᵊnt, -​ˈpre-​sə-​dənt \

: a condition that must be fulfilled before performance under a contract can become due, an estate can vest, or a right can become effective

condition subsequent

: a condition whose fulfillment defeats or modifies an estate or right already in effect or vested or discharges an already existing duty under a contract

constructive condition

: a condition created by operation of law

called also condition implied in law

— compare express condition in this entry

express condition

: a condition created and explicitly stated by the parties to a contract — compare constructive condition in this entry

potestative condition \ˈpō-​tes-​ˌtā-​tiv \

in the civil law of Louisiana : a condition whose fulfillment was completely within the power of the obligated party

Note: Article 1770 of the Louisiana Civil Code eliminates the term potestative condition, stating that suspensive conditions which depend on the whim of the obligated party make the obligation null, and that resolutory conditions which depend on the will of the obligated party must be fulfilled in good faith.

resolutory condition \ˌre-​zə-​ˈlü-​tə-​rē-​, ri-​ˈzäl-​yu̇-​ˌtōr-​ē-​ \

in the civil law of Louisiana : a condition that upon fulfillment terminates an already enforceable obligation and entitles the parties to be restored to their original positions — see also potestative condition in this entry

suspensive condition

in the civil law of Louisiana : a condition which must be fulfilled before an obligation is enforceable — see also potestative condition in this entry

2 : a state of being a latent defective condition

3 : one of the rights or obligations of the policyholder or the insurer set forth in an insurance policy

Other Words from condition

conditional adjective
conditionally adverb

condition

transitive verb
conditioned; conditioning

Legal Definition of condition (Entry 2 of 2)

: to make subject to conditions the sale…was orally conditioned upon approval of the patent— J. D. Calamari and J. M. Perillo

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