dismiss

verb
dis·​miss | \ dis-ˈmis \
dismissed; dismissing; dismisses

Definition of dismiss

transitive verb

1 : to permit or cause to leave dismiss the visitors Class is dismissed.
2 : to remove from position or service : discharge dismissed the thievish servant
3a : to reject serious consideration of dismissed the thought
b law : to put out of judicial consideration : refuse to hear or hear further in court dismiss all charges This case is dismissed.
4 : to put out (a batsman) in cricket

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Other Words from dismiss

dismission \ -​ˈmi-​shən \ noun
dismissive \ -​ˈmi-​siv \ adjective
dismissively adverb

Examples of dismiss in a Sentence

I don't think we should dismiss the matter lightly. The students were dismissed early because of the snowstorm. Several employees were recently dismissed.
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Recent Examples on the Web

Pope Francis, however, overruled the decision and ordered that the man be dismissed from the priesthood without delay. Francis X. Rocca, WSJ, "Vatican Panel Faces Criticism Over Leniency for Priests Guilty of Abuse," 21 Dec. 2018 Charter lost multiple court decisions Charter argued in court that the case should be dismissed, citing the FCC's net neutrality repeal and related preemption of state laws. Jon Brodkin, Ars Technica, "Charter users who didn’t get promised speeds will get $75 or $150 refunds," 18 Dec. 2018 No matter how beautiful, though, it should never be dismissed that the beauty started in pain. Claire Gibson, Marie Claire, "My Long, Messy, Beautifully Complicated Path to Adopting My Son," 1 Oct. 2018 Bumble says in a filing today that these claims are invalid and should be dismissed. Ashley Carman, The Verge, "Bumble asks court to rule Tinder patents invalid," 27 Sep. 2018 Defense attorneys are asking that the charges against Noor be dismissed. Amy Forliti, Fox News, "Defense: State made "lies by omission" about ex-officer," 12 Sep. 2018 This language, which also appears on the White House website, should not be dismissed. Brian Resnick, Vox, "Donald Trump and the disturbing power of dehumanizing language," 14 Aug. 2018 One issue, Willis said, is that in women, Parkinson’s symptoms may be dismissed as an emotional issue, such as anxiety. Terri Akman, Philly.com, "Parkinson's Disease may affect women differently. These researchers aim to find out why," 12 July 2018 Yet given the struggles of students in urban school districts, no proposal should be easily dismissed — so the question remains about whether the portfolio idea might be structured in ways that advance societal goals. Valerie Strauss, Washington Post, "What’s really going on in Indiana’s public schools," 12 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'dismiss.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of dismiss

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for dismiss

Middle English, modification of Latin dimissus, past participle of dimittere, from dis- + mittere to send

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Statistics for dismiss

Last Updated

8 Feb 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for dismiss

The first known use of dismiss was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for dismiss

dismiss

verb

English Language Learners Definition of dismiss

: to decide not to think about or consider (something or someone)
: to send (someone) away : to cause or allow (someone) to leave
: to officially make (someone) leave a job : to end the employment or service of (someone)

dismiss

verb
dis·​miss | \ dis-ˈmis \
dismissed; dismissing

Kids Definition of dismiss

1 : to allow or cause to leave dismiss a class
2 : to remove from a job or position She dismissed her assistant.
3 : to decide not to think about He dismissed the criticism.

dismiss

transitive verb
dis·​miss

Legal Definition of dismiss

1 : to remove from position or service dismissed the employee
2 : to bring about or order the dismissal of (an action) the suit was dismissed

intransitive verb

: to bring about or order a dismissal the plaintiff moved to dismiss

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More from Merriam-Webster on dismiss

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with dismiss

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for dismiss

Spanish Central: Translation of dismiss

Nglish: Translation of dismiss for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of dismiss for Arabic Speakers

Comments on dismiss

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