dismiss

verb
dis·​miss | \dis-ˈmis \

Definition of dismiss 

transitive verb

1 : to permit or cause to leave dismiss the visitors Class is dismissed.

2 : to remove from position or service : discharge dismissed the thievish servant

3a : to reject serious consideration of dismissed the thought

b law : to put out of judicial consideration : refuse to hear or hear further in court dismiss all charges This case is dismissed.

4 : to put out (a batsman) in cricket

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Other Words from dismiss

dismission \ -​ˈmi-​shən \ noun
dismissive \ -​ˈmi-​siv \ adjective
dismissively adverb

Examples of dismiss in a Sentence

I don't think we should dismiss the matter lightly. The students were dismissed early because of the snowstorm. Several employees were recently dismissed.
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Recent Examples on the Web

Shadowing the special counsel’s team is the looming likelihood that Trump could soon dismiss Attorney General Jeff Sessions — a shake-up that could spell the end of Deputy Attorney General Rod J. Rosenstein’s oversight of the investigation. Matt Zapotosky, The Seattle Times, "With the midterms over, special counsel Mueller faces key decisions in Russia investigation," 7 Nov. 2018 The question is not if, but how and when women in America will fully build the political power necessary to ensure that the issues that keep us up at night are not dismissed or marginalized, but front and center in the national debate. Cecile Richards, Glamour, "Five Activists Criss-Crossed the Country to Hear from Women. Here's What They Learned.," 6 Nov. 2018 The major music critics of the 1970s and 1980s were skeptical about Queen, dismissing the band as bombastic and haughty, antithetical to rock’s earthy working-class roots. Noel Murray, The Verge, "For the real Bohemian Rhapsody, stream the best recorded Queen concert this weekend," 2 Nov. 2018 Because the 2018 World Cup has been fantastic, and little Croatia, dismissed by many soccer snobs, particularly those in the British sports media, has magic at its feet. John Kass, chicagotribune.com, "Joy of Chicago's Croatians cresting as World Cup final with France approaches," 13 July 2018 The lawyer also argues that since Porter is not an attorney, the case should be dismissed. CBS News, "Woman assaulted at home of Buffalo Bills player LeSean McCoy, police say," 10 July 2018 An organization of this size wouldn’t have millions of followers if the church had a history of dismissing traumatic events. Michael Harriot, The Root, "#MourningWhileBlack: Priest Calls Cops on Black Funeral-Goers, Tells Them to 'Get the Hell Out' of Church," 2 July 2018 The third-place match at the World Cup is often dismissed as a pointless way for FIFA to fill TV space with two teams who just want to go home. James Ellingworth, chicagotribune.com, "England, Belgium face off again, this time with 3rd place at stake," 13 July 2018 Stzok, who was assigned to Special Counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into Russian meddling and ties to Trump associates, was ultimately dismissed from the team over the exchanges. CBS News, "FBI's Peter Strzok testifies on anti-Trump bias before House panel -- live updates," 12 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'dismiss.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of dismiss

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for dismiss

Middle English, modification of Latin dimissus, past participle of dimittere, from dis- + mittere to send

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Statistics for dismiss

Last Updated

15 Nov 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for dismiss

The first known use of dismiss was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for dismiss

dismiss

verb

English Language Learners Definition of dismiss

: to decide not to think about or consider (something or someone)

: to send (someone) away : to cause or allow (someone) to leave

: to officially make (someone) leave a job : to end the employment or service of (someone)

dismiss

verb
dis·​miss | \dis-ˈmis \
dismissed; dismissing

Kids Definition of dismiss

1 : to allow or cause to leave dismiss a class

2 : to remove from a job or position She dismissed her assistant.

3 : to decide not to think about He dismissed the criticism.

dismiss

transitive verb
dis·​miss

Legal Definition of dismiss 

1 : to remove from position or service dismissed the employee

2 : to bring about or order the dismissal of (an action) the suit was dismissed

intransitive verb

: to bring about or order a dismissal the plaintiff moved to dismiss

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Comments on dismiss

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