admission

noun

ad·​mis·​sion əd-ˈmi-shən How to pronounce admission (audio)
ad-
plural admissions
1
: an act of admitting : the fact or state of being admitted: such as
a
: the act of allowing something for consideration before a court
A small number of jurisdictions adhere to the position that a defendant may not complain on appeal about the admission of illegally obtained evidence … if the defendant gave testimony at trial admitting possession of that evidence. Wayne R. LaFave and Jerold H. Israel
b
: the right or permission to join or enter a place, a group, etc.
countries denied admission to NATO
c(1)
: the act or process of accepting someone as a student at a school
To a large degree, American education is organized for those who are already the best educated, a fact notoriously borne out in the college admissions process, where colleges compete for the top students and are rated by the percentage of these they attract. Gerald Graff
(2)
: the fact of being accepted as a student at a school
Competition for admission to these pre-K schools is so extreme that private counselors are frequently retained … to guide the parents through the application process. Jonathan Kozol
(3)
: someone who is so admitted
California State University will accept no new admissions for the spring semester of 2013 … as part of a drastic cost-cutting strategy to reduce enrollment by about 16,000 students next spring, officials said Monday. Nanette Asimov
d
: the act or process of accepting someone into a hospital, clinic, or other treatment facility as an inpatient
The patient was unconscious upon admission to the hospital.
also : someone who is so admitted
Many new admissions are discharged after a day's examination. Hanna L. Schussheim
2
: a fee paid for entering a place (such as a theater or museum)
a museum that offers reduced admission for children
3
a
: the granting of an argument or position not fully proved : the act of acknowledging something asserted
b
: acknowledgment that a fact or statement is true
c
: a revealing statement
an admission of failure
admissive adjective

Example Sentences

the admission of evidence in a court of law His statement was interpreted as an admission of failure. They opposed the admission of women into the club. Her injuries were serious enough to require hospital admission. a large number of hospital admissions The school's standards of admission are high. He submitted an application for admission to the school. See More
Recent Examples on the Web In Wayne County, the Wayne County Art Institute Authority (WCAIA) requires the museum to fulfill certain benefits for residents — like free admission and school trips. Miriam Marini, Detroit Free Press, 17 Nov. 2022 Failing to do so would be a major departure from last year’s climate pact and, to some, a tacit admission of defeat. David Gelles, BostonGlobe.com, 16 Nov. 2022 In another change, Disney will automatically grant a park reservation to those who purchase single-day, single-park admission when the new changes go into effect. Jacob Passy, WSJ, 16 Nov. 2022 Last Generation staged the protest on a day when the public was given free admission to the museum for St. Leopold's Day, in an event sponsored by OMV, an oil and gas company. Chris Pandolfo, Fox News, 15 Nov. 2022 There were no admission of wrongdoing under the terms of their settlements. Meryl Kornfield, Washington Post, 15 Nov. 2022 So there was an edge of honesty in the champagne silliness — an admission that, yes, this was a show made by the guys who flew to Cuba on Bezos' dime to make a gaseously pointless musical whatever. Darren Franich, EW.com, 14 Nov. 2022 Day’s frustration, though, was not his most revealing admission about this short-yardage conundrum. Nathan Baird, cleveland, 13 Nov. 2022 In honor of Veterans Day, the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department is also offering free admission to all state parks on Sunday. Shepard Price, San Antonio Express-News, 11 Nov. 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'admission.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

Word History

Etymology

Middle English admyssion, borrowed from Anglo-French, borrowed from Latin admissiōn-, admissiō "controlled mating (of animals), admittance to an interview," from admittere "to admit entry 1" + -tiōn-, -tiō, suffix of verbal action

First Known Use

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of admission was in the 15th century

Dictionary Entries Near admission

Cite this Entry

“Admission.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/admission. Accessed 30 Nov. 2022.

Kids Definition

admission

noun

ad·​mis·​sion əd-ˈmish-ən How to pronounce admission (audio)
ad-
1
: the act of admitting
especially : an admitting of something that has not been proved
an admission of guilt
2
: the right or permission to enter
standards of admission to a school
3
: the price of entrance

Medical Definition

admission

noun

ad·​mis·​sion əd-ˈmi-shən, ad- How to pronounce admission (audio)
: the act or process of accepting someone into a hospital, clinic, or other treatment facility as an inpatient
The patient was unconscious upon admission to the hospital.
also : someone who is so admitted
Many new admissions are discharged after a day's examination. Hanna L. Schussheim, The Washington Post

Legal Definition

admission

noun

ad·​mis·​sion
1
: the act or process of admitting
admission into evidence
2
a
: a party's acknowledgment that a fact or statement is true

Note: In civil cases admissions are often agreed to and offered in writing to the court before trial as a method of reducing the number of issues to be proven at trial.

b
: a party's prior out-of-court statement or action that is inconsistent with his or her position at trial and that tends to establish guilt compare confession, declaration against interest at declaration

Note: Under the Federal Rules of Evidence an admission is not hearsay. Silence can sometimes be construed as an admission where a person would reasonably be expected to speak up.

More from Merriam-Webster on admission

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