tie

verb
\ ˈtī \
tied; tying\ ˈtī-​iŋ \ or tieing

Definition of tie 

(Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to fasten, attach, or close by means of a tie
b : to form a knot or bow in tie your scarf
c : to make by tying constituent elements tied a wreath tie a fishing fly
2a : to place or establish in relationship : connect
b : to unite in marriage
c : to unite (musical notes) by a tie
d : to join (power systems) electrically
3 : to restrain from independence or freedom of action or choice : constrain by or as if by authority, influence, agreement, or obligation
4a(1) : to make or have an equal score with in a contest
(2) : to equalize (the score) in a game or contest
(3) : to equalize the score of (a game)
b : to provide or offer something equal to : equal

intransitive verb

: to make a tie: such as
a : to make a bond or connection
b : to make an equal score
c : to become attached
d : to close by means of a tie
tie into
: to attack with vigor
tie one on
slang
: to get drunk
tie the knot
: to perform a marriage ceremony also : to get married

tie

noun

Definition of tie (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : a line, ribbon, or cord used for fastening, uniting, or drawing something closed especially : shoelace
b(1) : a structural element (such as a rod or angle iron) holding two pieces together : a tension member in a construction
(2) : any of the transverse supports to which railroad rails are fastened to keep them in line
2 : something that serves as a connecting link: such as
a : a moral or legal obligation to someone or something typically constituting a restraining power, influence, or duty
b : a bond of kinship or affection
3 : a curved line that joins two musical notes of the same pitch to denote a single tone sustained through the time value of the two
4a : an equality in number (as of votes or scores)
b : equality in a contest also : a contest that ends in a draw
5 : a method or style of tying or knotting
6 : something that is knotted or is to be knotted when worn: such as
a : necktie
b : a low laced shoe : oxford

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Other Words from tie

Noun

tieless \ ˈtī-​ləs \ adjective

Synonyms & Antonyms for tie

Synonyms: Verb

band, bind, truss

Synonyms: Noun

dead heat, draw, stalemate, standoff

Antonyms: Verb

unbind, untie

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Examples of tie in a Sentence

Verb

His kidnappers tied him to a chair. She tied a scarf around her neck. She tied knots in the rope. You need to tie your shoe. His hands and feet had been tied together. She tied the apron loosely around her waist. The team still has a chance to tie. I had the lead but he tied me by making a birdie on the last hole. Her time tied the world record. He tied the school's record in the high jump.

Noun

He was wearing a suit and tie. You have a spot on your tie. The pants have a tie at the top. He was not ready to accept the ties of family life.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Like Pocahontas, Sacagawea was a real person, one whose life is directly tied to America’s colonialist history. Ruth Hopkins, Teen Vogue, "Sacagawea Changed the Course of History and Deserves Respect," 11 Jan. 2019 But Apple’s services are tied to the amount of iPhones, iPads and Macs in people’s hands—and growth in those devices has begun to slow. Tripp Mickle, WSJ, "Apple’s Pressing Challenge: Build Its Services Business," 10 Jan. 2019 Liver cancer deaths have been increasing since the 1970s, and initially most of the increase was tied to hepatitis C infections spread among people who abuse drugs. Mike Stobbe, The Seattle Times, "US cancer death rate hits milestone: 25 years of decline," 8 Jan. 2019 Trump initially announced the across-the-board pay freeze in August, saying the federal government couldn’t sustain the cost-of-living pay increase and that raises should be tied to performance. Amanda Sakuma, Vox, "Trump orders federal pay freeze for 2019," 30 Dec. 2018 But there’s still a lot of money, there’s over a hundred billion dollars in distribution fees that is overwhelmingly tied to sports. Eric Johnson, Recode, "John Skipper, ESPN’s former president, is back ... at a rival sports media company.," 8 Nov. 2018 Mamić, who donated money to current Croatian President Kolinda Grabar-Kitarović’s campaign (and was reportedly a friend), was tied to some of the nation’s most prominent players due to their almost inevitable time at Dinamo. Hayden Bird, BostonGlobe.com, "What to know about the World Cup title match," 14 July 2018 If the aggregate score is tied, the teams would immediately play an overtime period to determine which advances. Jonas Shaffer, baltimoresun.com, "No. 2 seed Brigade open Arena Football League semifinal series at Philadelphia," 13 July 2018 They were announced as state and federal health authorities investigate another outbreak of 225 cases in Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota and Wisconsin that have been tied to Fresh Del Monte Produce vegetable trays. Matthew Haag, New York Times, "McDonald’s Removes Salads Linked to Intestinal Parasite Outbreak in Midwest," 13 July 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

The indictment unsealed Tuesday is unrelated to the 2016 Trump Tower meeting, but suggests Ms. Veselnitskaya had close ties to senior Russian government officials and at times sought to advance Russia’s interests in her dealings with U.S. officials. Rebecca Ballhaus, WSJ, "Russian Lawyer Charged With Obstruction of Justice," 8 Jan. 2019 Manufactured by Fossil Group, which has ties to a number of fashion brands, these are timepieces that aim to catch the eye as well as meet data needs. David Lazarus, The Seattle Times, "8 great smartwatch picks (that aren’t Apple)," 7 Jan. 2019 Both candidates had subtle ties to New York's Ocasio-Cortez. Erica Gonzales, Harper's BAZAAR, "20 Big Firsts and Historic Wins from the 2018 Midterm Elections," 7 Nov. 2018 Cambridge Analytica, which has ties to Donald Trump’s 2016 presidential election campaign, denies any wrongdoing. Chris Ciaccia, Fox News, "Cambridge Analytica shutting down, company says," 2 Oct. 2018 Facebook also elaborated a bit on why these new accounts may have ties to the IRA. Kurt Wagner, Recode, "Facebook has discovered a ‘coordinated’ campaign of misinformation accounts ahead of the U.S. midterm elections," 31 July 2018 Kourtney and Kendall also took turns sledding down the hill in their black-tie gowns, although Kendall's ride ended in a bit of a tumble. Whitney Perry, Glamour, "The 2018 Kardashian Christmas Party Was More Over-the-Top Kardashian Than Ever," 25 Dec. 2018 Like most styles, the cover comes with ties to attach your duvet insert and buttons to close it. Lexie Sachs, Good Housekeeping, "6 Best Duvet Covers, According to Textile Experts," 21 Dec. 2018 Thursday morning, many Slack users with ties to Iran discovered their accounts had been abruptly deactivated. Russell Brandom, The Verge, "Slack is banning some users with links to Iran even if they’ve left the country," 20 Dec. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'tie.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of tie

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for tie

Noun

Middle English teg, tye, from Old English tēag; akin to Old Norse taug rope, Old English tēon to pull — more at tow entry 1

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Statistics for tie

Last Updated

16 Jan 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for tie

The first known use of tie was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for tie

tie

noun

English Language Learners Definition of tie

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a piece of string, ribbon, cord, etc., that is used for fastening, joining, or closing something

: something (such as an idea, interest, experience, or feeling) that is shared by people or groups and that forms a connection between them

: a responsibility that limits a person's freedom to do other things

tie

verb

English Language Learners Definition of tie (Entry 2 of 2)

: to attach (someone or something) to something with a string, rope, etc.

: to pass (something, such as a string, ribbon, or rope) around itself in a way that attaches it to something or holds it in place : to make a knot or bow in (something)

: to close or hold (something) with a string, rope, etc., that is attached to it or wrapped around it

tie

noun
\ ˈtī \

Kids Definition of tie

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : necktie
2 : an equality in number (as of votes or scores) The game ended in a tie.
3 : a contest that ends with an equal score They finished the season with six wins and two ties.
4 : one of the cross supports to which railroad rails are fastened
5 : a connecting link : bond family ties
6 : a line, ribbon, or cord used for fastening, joining, or closing
7 : a part (as a beam or rod) holding two pieces together

tie

verb
tied; tying\ ˈtī-​iŋ \ or tieing

Kids Definition of tie (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to fasten, attach, or close by means of a tie
2 : to form a knot or bow in
3 : to bring together firmly : unite They are tied by marriage.
4 : to hold back from freedom of action Obligations tied her down.
5 : to make or have an equal score with in a contest

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More from Merriam-Webster on tie

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for tie

Spanish Central: Translation of tie

Nglish: Translation of tie for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of tie for Arabic Speakers

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