term

noun
\ ˈtərm How to pronounce term (audio) \

Definition of term

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : a word or expression that has a precise meaning in some uses or is peculiar to a science, art, profession, or subject legal terms
b terms plural : expression of a specified kind described in glowing terms
2a : a limited or definite extent of time especially : the time for which something lasts : duration, tenure term of office lost money in the short term
b : the whole period for which an estate is granted also : the estate or interest held by one for a term
c : the time during which a court is in session
3 : division in a school year during which instruction is regularly given to students
4 terms plural : provisions that determine the nature and scope of an agreement : conditions terms of sale liberal credit terms
5 terms plural
a : mutual relationship : footing on good terms
b : agreement, concord come to terms after extensive negotiations
c : a state of acceptance or understanding came to terms with the failure of his marriage
6a : the time at which a pregnancy of normal length terminates had her baby at full term
b : end, termination also : a point in time assigned to something (such as a payment)
7a : a unitary or compound expression connected with another by a plus or minus sign
b : an element of a fraction or proportion or of a series or sequence
8 : any of the three substantive elements of a syllogism
9 : a quadrangular pillar often tapering downward and adorned on the top with the figure of a head or the upper part of the body
in terms of
: with respect to or in relation to thinks of everything in terms of money
on one's own terms
: in accordance with one's wishes : in one's own way prefers to live on his own terms

term

verb
termed; terming; terms

Definition of term (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to apply a term to : call, name

Synonyms for term

Synonyms: Noun

Synonyms: Verb

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Examples of term in a Sentence

Noun “I had the feeling that I had been there before.” “The term for that is ‘déjà vu.’” That's an outdated term that no one uses anymore. He spoke about them in glowing terms. The law had been understood in broad terms. The governor will run for a second term. He is currently serving his third term in the U.S. Senate. He was sentenced to a ten-year term in the state penitentiary. The term of the contract is 60 months. His grades have improved since last term. English 122 is not offered this term. Verb They termed the structure a “double helix.” The project was termed a success. See More
Recent Examples on the Web: Noun While many small businesses have welcomed the new scheme, a number of business owners have criticized the government for acting too late and failing to implement longer-term protections. Chloe Taylor, Fortune, 21 Sep. 2022 After renting for seven years, Jacobs had hoped to buy a property as a longer-term investment. Elizabeth Schulze, ABC News, 21 Sep. 2022 The newly deputized officers will have the option to use ATF resources for investigation of firearm trafficking and will be able to conduct longer term operations, when necessary, according to the village. Mike Nolan, Chicago Tribune, 20 Sep. 2022 Some sellers are choosing to wait out the housing market to see what happens with prices: Hertzberg said about 10% of his clients are pausing for the longer term, while about 25% are waiting for a few months. Amber Bonefont, Sun Sentinel, 19 Sep. 2022 In a recent letter, water authority General Manager John Entsminger called for swift cuts aimed at stabilizing the Colorado River’s reservoirs while longer-term agreements can be negotiated. The Salt Lake Tribune, 15 Sep. 2022 The research, which represents estimates and not actual numbers of affected people, tracks with some other recent studies on the constellation of longer-term symptoms after coronavirus infections. Arkansas Online, 15 Sep. 2022 But Kinzinger, who is just 44, hinted at his longer-term project: breaking the monopoly of the two major parties and creating a third that could meld center left and right voters. David Axelrod, CNN, 15 Sep. 2022 Core prices, which exclude volatile food and energy items and generally provide a better measure of longer-term trends, increased a larger-than-expected 0.6% following a 0.3% rise the previous month. Paul Davidson, USA TODAY, 13 Sep. 2022 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb China has refused to criticize Moscow’s aggression or even term it an invasion, while condemning Western sanctions against Russia and accusing the U.S. and NATO of provoking the conflict. Mark Schiefelbein, The Christian Science Monitor, 8 July 2022 Beijing has so far declined to criticize Russia or even to term its actions in Ukraine an invasion, expressing sympathy with the security concerns Moscow has cited as among the reasons for the military assault. Alex Leary And Lingling Wei, WSJ, 18 Mar. 2022 As laid out in a TIME examination of the case, their common account has since been contradicted by forensic evidence gathered by Franklin’s family, who term his death an assassination. Karl Vick, Time, 7 Oct. 2021 In those critical pre-landfall hours, the storm underwent a process that scientists term rapid intensification — and this is where warming temperatures plays a pivotal role in generating more powerful hurricanes. chicagotribune.com, 31 Aug. 2021 To put it mildly, this is not a great way to embark on the road towards a ‘new world order’ as many politicians now term it, or the building of the post COVID economy. Mike O'sullivan, Forbes, 29 May 2021 Vogel said James came out of Monday's practice fine and would not term Tuesday's absence as precautionary. Joe Reedy, Star Tribune, 11 May 2021 It’s that experienced depth that has caused head coach Kane Wommack to term the defensive line the leaders of the South Alabama defense. Creg Stephenson | Cstephenson@al.com, al, 9 Apr. 2021 The Lions are in a state of rebuild, no matter how Holmes wants to term it, and the only way to do that properly is to tear the organization down to its studs. Dave Birkett, Detroit Free Press, 24 Jan. 2021 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'term.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of term

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 6b

Verb

1545, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for term

Noun

Middle English terme, from Anglo-French, from Latin terminus boundary marker, limit; akin to Greek termōn boundary, end, Sanskrit tarman top of a post

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Time Traveler for term

Time Traveler

The first known use of term was in the 13th century

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Dictionary Entries Near term

terlinguaite

term

termagancy

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Statistics for term

Last Updated

23 Sep 2022

Cite this Entry

“Term.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/term. Accessed 25 Sep. 2022.

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More Definitions for term

term

noun
\ ˈtərm How to pronounce term (audio) \

Kids Definition of term

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a word or expression that has an exact meaning in some uses or is limited to a subject or field legal terms
2 : a period of time fixed especially by law or custom a school term
3 terms plural : conditions that limit the nature and scope of something (as a treaty or a will) the terms of a contract
4 terms plural : relationship between people I'm on good terms with the neighbors.
5 : any one of the numbers in a series
6 : the numerator or denominator of a fraction

term

verb
termed; terming

Kids Definition of term (Entry 2 of 2)

: to call by a particular name "… it pleases him to be termed Emperor rather than King."— L. Frank Baum, The Marvelous Land of Oz

term

noun
\ ˈtərm How to pronounce term (audio) \

Medical Definition of term

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: the time at which a pregnancy of normal length terminates had her baby at full term

term

adjective

Medical Definition of term (Entry 2 of 2)

: carried to, occurring at, or associated with full term a term infant term births

term

noun, often attributive

Legal Definition of term

1 : a specified period of time the policy term
2 : the whole period for which an estate is granted also : the estate itself
3a : the period in which the powers of a court may be validly exercised
b : session
4 : a word, phrase, or provision of import especially in determining the nature and scope of an agreement usually used in pl. the terms of the contract

More from Merriam-Webster on term

Nglish: Translation of term for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of term for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about term

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