term

noun
\ ˈtərm How to pronounce term (audio) \

Definition of term

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : a word or expression that has a precise meaning in some uses or is peculiar to a science, art, profession, or subject legal terms
b terms plural : expression of a specified kind described in glowing terms
2a : a limited or definite extent of time especially : the time for which something lasts : duration, tenure term of office lost money in the short term
b : the whole period for which an estate is granted also : the estate or interest held by one for a term
c : the time during which a court is in session
3 : division in a school year during which instruction is regularly given to students
4 terms plural : provisions that determine the nature and scope of an agreement : conditions terms of sale liberal credit terms
5 terms plural
a : mutual relationship : footing on good terms
b : agreement, concord come to terms after extensive negotiations
c : a state of acceptance or understanding came to terms with the failure of his marriage
6a : the time at which a pregnancy of normal length terminates had her baby at full term
b : end, termination also : a point in time assigned to something (such as a payment)
7a : a unitary or compound expression connected with another by a plus or minus sign
b : an element of a fraction or proportion or of a series or sequence
8 : any of the three substantive elements of a syllogism
9 : a quadrangular pillar often tapering downward and adorned on the top with the figure of a head or the upper part of the body
in terms of
: with respect to or in relation to thinks of everything in terms of money
on one's own terms
: in accordance with one's wishes : in one's own way prefers to live on his own terms

term

verb
termed; terming; terms

Definition of term (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to apply a term to : call, name

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Synonyms for term

Synonyms: Noun

Synonyms: Verb

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Examples of term in a Sentence

Noun “I had the feeling that I had been there before.” “The term for that is ‘déjà vu.’” That's an outdated term that no one uses anymore. He spoke about them in glowing terms. The law had been understood in broad terms. The governor will run for a second term. He is currently serving his third term in the U.S. Senate. He was sentenced to a ten-year term in the state penitentiary. The term of the contract is 60 months. His grades have improved since last term. English 122 is not offered this term. Verb They termed the structure a “double helix.” The project was termed a success.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Dating is an audition for a long-term relationship. BostonGlobe.com, 24 July 2021 There is no constitutional way for Trump to return to the White House before President Joe Biden's term is over. Mckenzie Sadeghi, USA TODAY, 23 July 2021 Each term is four years, with members earning $125 per meeting. John Benson, cleveland, 23 July 2021 Long-term care facilities have experienced notably bad outbreaks. Will Raderman, STAT, 23 July 2021 The Walkers view it as the next step in the growth process for girls — and their families —eyeing a long-term commitment. Will Graves, Chron, 23 July 2021 Days away from the opening of training camp, Colts owner Jim Irsay reaffirmed the team’s commitment to getting two of its pillars from the 2018 draft locked up long-term before the final season of their rookie contract begins. Joel A. Erickson, The Indianapolis Star, 23 July 2021 The fifth-largest spender was the long-term care industry group Oregon Health Care Association, which sank $256,802 into lobbying in the first six months of the year, according to state records. oregonlive, 23 July 2021 The Healy’s cruise comes a time when the Coast Guard wants to ramp up its presence in the Arctic amid long-term warming trends — due to climate change from human activity — that is reducing ice and increasing vessel traffic. Author: Hal Bernton, Anchorage Daily News, 23 July 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb To put it mildly, this is not a great way to embark on the road towards a ‘new world order’ as many politicians now term it, or the building of the post COVID economy. Mike O'sullivan, Forbes, 29 May 2021 Vogel said James came out of Monday's practice fine and would not term Tuesday's absence as precautionary. Joe Reedy, Star Tribune, 11 May 2021 It’s that experienced depth that has caused head coach Kane Wommack to term the defensive line the leaders of the South Alabama defense. Creg Stephenson | Cstephenson@al.com, al, 9 Apr. 2021 The Lions are in a state of rebuild, no matter how Holmes wants to term it, and the only way to do that properly is to tear the organization down to its studs. Dave Birkett, Detroit Free Press, 24 Jan. 2021 At the same time, Gov. Jerry Brown was set to term out in 2018. Phil Matier, SFChronicle.com, 3 Nov. 2020 Bill Clinton, whose career was frequently likened to McKay’s, had been president for six desultory years of what is now termed neoliberalism. Kyle Smith, National Review, 11 Mar. 2020 By the end of it, 19 Indian jawans were killed and about 30 were injured in what was termed the deadliest attack on Indian security forces in Kashmir in nearly two and a half decades. Nikhil Inamdar, Quartz India, 15 Jan. 2020 Previously, refunds were only available to games that were canceled, but games not played in March and April were officially termed postponed by MLB. Los Angeles Times, 30 Apr. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'term.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of term

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 6b

Verb

1545, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for term

Noun

Middle English terme, from Anglo-French, from Latin terminus boundary marker, limit; akin to Greek termōn boundary, end, Sanskrit tarman top of a post

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Time Traveler for term

Time Traveler

The first known use of term was in the 13th century

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Dictionary Entries Near term

terlinguaite

term

termagancy

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Statistics for term

Last Updated

25 Jul 2021

Cite this Entry

“Term.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/term. Accessed 30 Jul. 2021.

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More Definitions for term

term

noun

English Language Learners Definition of term

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a word or phrase that has an exact meaning
: the particular kinds of words used to describe someone or something
: the length of time during which a person has an official or political office

term

verb

English Language Learners Definition of term (Entry 2 of 2)

: to give a particular name or description to (something) : to call (something) by a particular name or to describe (something) in a particular way

term

noun
\ ˈtərm How to pronounce term (audio) \

Kids Definition of term

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a word or expression that has an exact meaning in some uses or is limited to a subject or field legal terms
2 : a period of time fixed especially by law or custom a school term
3 terms plural : conditions that limit the nature and scope of something (as a treaty or a will) the terms of a contract
4 terms plural : relationship between people I'm on good terms with the neighbors.
5 : any one of the numbers in a series
6 : the numerator or denominator of a fraction

term

verb
termed; terming

Kids Definition of term (Entry 2 of 2)

: to call by a particular name "… it pleases him to be termed Emperor rather than King."— L. Frank Baum, The Marvelous Land of Oz

term

noun
\ ˈtərm How to pronounce term (audio) \

Medical Definition of term

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: the time at which a pregnancy of normal length terminates had her baby at full term

term

adjective

Medical Definition of term (Entry 2 of 2)

: carried to, occurring at, or associated with full term a term infant term births

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term

noun, often attributive

Legal Definition of term

1 : a specified period of time the policy term
2 : the whole period for which an estate is granted also : the estate itself
3a : the period in which the powers of a court may be validly exercised
b : session
4 : a word, phrase, or provision of import especially in determining the nature and scope of an agreement usually used in pl. the terms of the contract

More from Merriam-Webster on term

Nglish: Translation of term for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of term for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about term

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