surrender

1 of 2

verb

sur·​ren·​der sə-ˈren-dər How to pronounce surrender (audio)
surrendered; surrendering sə-ˈren-d(ə-)riŋ How to pronounce surrender (audio)

transitive verb

1
a
: to yield to the power, control, or possession of another upon compulsion or demand
surrendered the fort
b
: to give up completely or agree to forgo especially in favor of another
2
a
: to give (oneself) up into the power of another especially as a prisoner
b
: to give (oneself) over to something (such as an influence)

intransitive verb

: to give oneself up into the power of another : yield

surrender

2 of 2

noun

1
a
: the action of yielding one's person or giving up the possession of something especially into the power of another
b
: the relinquishment by a patentee of rights or claims under a patent
c
: the delivery of a principal into lawful custody by bail

called also surrender by bail

d
: the voluntary cancellation of the legal liability of an insurance company by the insured and beneficiary for a consideration
e
: the delivery of a fugitive from justice by one government to another
2
: an instance of surrendering
Choose the Right Synonym for surrender

relinquish, yield, resign, surrender, abandon, waive mean to give up completely.

relinquish usually does not imply strong feeling but may suggest some regret, reluctance, or weakness.

relinquished her crown

yield implies concession or compliance or submission to force.

the troops yielded ground grudgingly

resign emphasizes voluntary relinquishment or sacrifice without struggle.

resigned her position

surrender implies a giving up after a struggle to retain or resist.

surrendered their claims

abandon stresses finality and completeness in giving up.

abandoned all hope

waive implies conceding or forgoing with little or no compulsion.

waived the right to a trial by jury

Example Sentences

Verb The enemy finally surrendered after three days of fighting. The gunman surrendered and was taken into custody. The troops were forced to surrender the fort. They were required to surrender their passports. the surrendering of land to the government He refused to surrender to despair. He refused to surrender himself to despair. Noun Their surrender was formalized in a treaty. They demanded an unconditional surrender. See More
Recent Examples on the Web
Verb
Why does Mercer surrender himself to Pamela's spy there? Dalton Ross, EW.com, 14 Nov. 2022 But society need not surrender to poor comprehension and moral illiteracy. Madiba Dennie, The New Republic, 2 Nov. 2022 Harris must surrender to begin serving his sentence in about 90 days. oregonlive, 26 Oct. 2022 As Stroud leads the country with 10.9 yards per pass attempt, the Hawkeyes surrender only 4.7 yards per attempt, a mark that ranks the best among 131 FBS teams. USA TODAY, 22 Oct. 2022 Even after the crash, the suspect refused to surrender, barricading himself in the vehicle until finally being taken into custody at around 7:55 p.m, according to Los Angeles County Fire Department. CBS News, 14 Oct. 2022 The San Francisco 49ers did not surrender a touchdown against the Rams and sacked Stafford seven times. Los Angeles Times, 10 Oct. 2022 That made it 14-0 after one quarter and Pinnacle would not surrender the momentum. Azcentral.com, The Arizona Republic, 18 Nov. 2022 Cantor was unfairly targeted as an out-of-touch establishment figure who would surrender and capitulate to Democrats on immigration reform. Charlie Dent, CNN, 17 Nov. 2022
Noun
The day of liberation came with the surrender of Germany on May 8, 1945. Kerry J. Byrne, Fox News, 30 Nov. 2022 Pope Francis also defended the Vatican’s power-sharing agreement with Beijing on the appointment of bishops in China, which has been criticized as a surrender of religious freedom. Francis X. Rocca, WSJ, 28 Nov. 2022 If regulators approve on Thursday, Oregon, California and the Klamath River Renewal Corporation — the entity formed to oversee the demolition and environmental mitigation — must sign off on the license surrender and then work can begin. Gillian Flaccus, BostonGlobe.com, 17 Nov. 2022 If regulators approve on Thursday, Oregon, California and the Klamath River Renewal Corporation — the entity formed to oversee the demolition and environmental mitigation — must sign off on the license surrender and then work can begin. Gillian Flaccus, ajc, 17 Nov. 2022 The Kremlin tries to draw endless historical parallels between the war in Ukraine and the key role the Soviet Union played in defeating Nazi Germany, but one publication wrote that the surrender of Kherson failed to live up to that legacy. Neil Macfarquhar, New York Times, 13 Nov. 2022 Reporters for The Washington Post were among the first wave of journalists to reach Kherson city on Saturday, and everywhere there was evidence of the intense fighting that preceded the Russian surrender. Anastacia Galouchka, Washington Post, 12 Nov. 2022 Budanov said Sergei Surovikin, who commands the Southern Group of Russian troops in the war, may be keeping up the appearance of an orderly withdrawal to mute the reaction of Russian society in the event of the surrender or loss of Kherson. John Bacon, USA TODAY, 24 Oct. 2022 A few days after the surrender, the family of one of those four soldiers received word that their son was executed for war crimes, Kuparashvili added. Diane Bell, San Diego Union-Tribune, 4 Oct. 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'surrender.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

Word History

Etymology

Verb

Middle English surrendren, from surrendre, noun

Noun

Middle English surrendre, from Anglo-French, from surrendre, susrendre to relinquish, from sur- & sus-, suz under + rendre to give back — more at render, sous-chef

First Known Use

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Time Traveler
The first known use of surrender was in the 15th century

Dictionary Entries Near surrender

Cite this Entry

“Surrender.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/surrender. Accessed 8 Dec. 2022.

Kids Definition

surrender

1 of 2 verb
sur·​ren·​der sə-ˈren-dər How to pronounce surrender (audio)
surrendered; surrendering -d(ə-)riŋ How to pronounce surrender (audio)
1
: to give over to the power, control, or possession of another especially by force
2
: to give oneself over to something

surrender

2 of 2 noun
: the giving of oneself or something into the power of another person or thing

Legal Definition

surrender

1 of 2 transitive verb
sur·​ren·​der
1
a
: to yield to the control or possession of another
surrender the leased premises
surrender collateral to a creditor
b
: to give up completely or agree to forgo
c
: to cancel (one's insurance policy) voluntarily
2
: to give over to the custody of the law
surrender a defendant

intransitive verb

: to give oneself up

surrender

2 of 2 noun
: an act or instance of surrendering
discharge an obligor by surrender of a promissory note
especially : the yielding of an estate by a tenant to the landlord so that the leasehold interest is extinguished by mutual agreement

More from Merriam-Webster on surrender

Last Updated: - Updated example sentences
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