stroke

verb (1)
\ ˈstrōk How to pronounce stroke (audio) \
stroked; stroking

Definition of stroke

 (Entry 1 of 3)

transitive verb

1 : to rub gently in one direction also : caress
2 : to flatter or pay attention to in a manner designed to reassure or persuade

stroke

noun

Definition of stroke (Entry 2 of 3)

1 : the act of striking especially : a blow with a weapon or implement
2 : a single unbroken movement especially : one of a series of repeated or to-and-fro movements
3a : a controlled swing intended to hit a ball or shuttlecock also : a striking of the ball
b : such a stroke charged to a player as a unit of scoring in golf
4a : a sudden action or process producing an impact a stroke of lightning
b : an unexpected result a stroke of luck the idea was a stroke of inspiration a master stroke of diplomacy
5 : sudden impairment or loss of consciousness, sensation, and voluntary motion that is caused by rupture or obstruction (as by a clot) of a blood vessel supplying the brain, and is accompanied by permanent damage of brain tissue #Symptoms of stroke include numbness or weakness on one side of the body or face, confusion, impaired speech or vision, loss of coordination or balance, trouble walking, or severe headache.

called also apoplexy, brain attack, cerebrovascular accident

— compare ischemic stroke, hemorrhagic stroke, transient ischemic attack
6a : one of a series of propelling beats or movements against a resisting medium a stroke of the oar
b : a rower who sets the pace for a crew
7a : a vigorous or energetic effort by which something is done, produced, or accomplished a stroke of genius a brilliant diplomatic stroke
b : a delicate or clever touch in a narrative, description, or construction
9 : the movement in either direction of a mechanical part (such as a piston) having a reciprocating motion also : the distance of such movement
10 : the sound of a bell being struck at the stroke of twelve also : the specific time indicated by or as if by such a sound
11 [stroke entry 1] : an act of stroking or caressing
12a : a mark or dash made by a single movement of an implement
b : one of the lines of a letter of the alphabet
at a stroke
: all at once spent her savings at a stroke

stroke

verb (2)
stroked; stroking

Definition of stroke (Entry 3 of 3)

transitive verb

1a : to mark with a short line stroke the t's
b : to cancel by drawing a line through stroked out his name
2 : to set the stroke for (a rowing crew) also : to set the stroke for the crew of (a rowing boat)
3 sports : to hit, kick, or shoot (a ball) with a smooth movement stroke a putt stroked a single to left field

intransitive verb

1 : to execute a stroke
2 : to row at a certain number of strokes a minute

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Other Words from stroke

Verb (1)

stroker noun

Examples of stroke in a Sentence

Noun He had a stroke last winter. She has a strong backhand stroke. He is ahead by two strokes. She swims with long, smooth strokes. the stroke of an oar She knows the four basic strokes.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Symptoms range from weakness to stroke to paralysis to cognitive disabilities. Shari Rudavsky, The Indianapolis Star, "'Look how far you've come': For some COVID patients recovery takes weeks or months," 10 June 2020 Essentially, this engine is the 992-generation 911’s 3.0-liter flat-six, though Porsche bores and strokes it out to 4.0 liters and rips off the turbos. Connor Hoffman, Car and Driver, "Porsche 718 Boxster and Cayman GTS Have Flat-Six Power Once Again," 15 Jan. 2020 Azure stroked it with a claw, and the egg crumbled away, leaving a brilliant green baby dragon sitting among the shards. cleveland, "Emerald Forest-wind: A story from Write About Now," 19 Nov. 2019 The lawsuit accuses her of stroking her hand across John Doe 1's lap toward his inner leg and caressing his chest and face. NBC News, "NFL player sues United Airlines, alleges woman sexually assaulted him on flight," 20 May 2020 MOBILE REGION Hannah Atwood, Spanish Fort (softball): Pitched a no-hitter with eight strikeouts and a walk, adding a two-run double in a win then stroked an RBI-triple in another victory. Dennis Victory, al, "Vote for the statewide high school girls spring sports Player of the Week March 9-14," 17 Mar. 2020 The second option, massages, can include everything from hair stroking to back kneading. New York Times, "Preparing for Birth Without Pain Medication," 18 Apr. 2020 Touch can be a nurse’s greatest tool: holding a hand, wiping away a tear, stroking a face. Sumathi Reddy, WSJ, "Four Dispatches From the Pandemic’s Front Lines," 14 Apr. 2020 Spence was 4-4 in a 10-4 win over St. Michaels, stroking a single, double and two triples. Dennis Victory, al, "See high school spring sports boys, girls top performance winners Week 2," 20 Mar. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Some patients who show up in the emergency room have only shown signs of stroke. Dr. Minali Nigam And Dr. Sanjay Gupta, CNN, "We're only just beginning to learn how Covid-19 affects the brain," 29 July 2020 In fact, recent research is showing excess deaths from chronic diseases like heart disease, stroke, and diabetes. Kyu Rhee, Fortune, "There are 3 more curves to flatten in addition to COVID-19’s," 29 July 2020 The patients, ages 16 to 85, had delirium (a period of severe mental confusion that often arrives rapidly), psychosis, stroke, seizures, and face or limb muscle weakness, among other symptoms. Julie Washington, cleveland, "Add delirium, hallucinations to list of symptoms associated with COVID-19," 13 July 2020 Research from the Center for Well-Being and Society has found that laughing decreases cardiovascular disease, and lowers the incidence of stroke in those who laugh daily. Nicole Clancy, Better Homes & Gardens, "Laughter Really Is the Best Medicine: 6 Easy Ways to Add More Humor to Your Day," 10 July 2020 The most common cause of the most prevalent mitochondrial disease, MELAS (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes), in which children have repeated strokes, is an A where a G should be. Sharon Begley, STAT, "Gene-editing discovery could point the way toward a ‘holy grail’: cures for mitochondrial diseases," 8 July 2020 Regardless if such an advisory is issued, Houstonians should exercise caution when working and playing in the heat by limiting their exposure and knowing the signs of heat stroke. Jay R. Jordan, Houston Chronicle, "It’s going to get hotter, Houston," 8 July 2020 If someone is showing signs of a heat stroke, call 911. Madeline Mitchell, The Enquirer, "Weather: Heat advisory in effect Thursday afternoon, forecasters say heat index could reach 103," 8 July 2020 Warmer weather and not as much rain in the fall, a potential boon for baseball and softball; cooler conditions in the spring, meaning less risk of heat stroke for football players. Kevin Sherrington, Dallas News, "Is moving football to the spring really such a bad idea? Like it or not, it’s time to consider the option," 5 July 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'stroke.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of stroke

Verb (1)

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb (2)

1597, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

History and Etymology for stroke

Verb (1)

Middle English, from Old English strācian; akin to Old High German strīhhan to stroke — more at strike

Noun

Middle English; akin to Old English strīcan to stroke — more at strike

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Time Traveler for stroke

Time Traveler

The first known use of stroke was before the 12th century

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Statistics for stroke

Last Updated

26 Jun 2020

Cite this Entry

“Stroke.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/stroke. Accessed 8 Aug. 2020.

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More Definitions for stroke

stroke

noun

English Language Learners Definition of stroke

medical : a serious illness caused when a blood vessel in your brain suddenly breaks or is blocked
: an act of hitting a ball or the movement made to hit a ball during a game
golf : an act of hitting the ball that is counted as part of a player's score

stroke

verb
\ ˈstrōk How to pronounce stroke (audio) \
stroked; stroking

Kids Definition of stroke

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to rub gently in one direction I stroked the dog's head.

stroke

noun

Kids Definition of stroke (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : the act of striking : blow the stroke of a whip
2 : one of a series of repeated movements (as in swimming or rowing)
3 : a sudden serious illness caused by the breaking or blocking of an artery in the brain
4 : the sound of striking (as of a clock or bell) the stroke of midnight
5 : the hitting of a ball in a game (as golf or tennis)
6 : a sudden or unexpected example a stroke of luck
7 : a single movement or the mark made by a single movement of a brush, pen, or tool
8 : a sudden action or process that results in something being struck a stroke of lightning
9 : effort by which something is done or the results of such effort It was a stroke of genius.

stroke

noun
\ ˈstrōk How to pronounce stroke (audio) \

Medical Definition of stroke

: sudden impairment or loss of consciousness, sensation, and voluntary motion that is caused by rupture or obstruction (as by a clot) of a blood vessel supplying the brain and is accompanied by permanent damage of brain tissue

Note: Symptoms of stroke include numbness or weakness on one side of the body or face, confusion, impaired speech or vision, loss of coordination or balance, trouble walking, or severe headache. The most common type of stroke, ischemic stroke, results from a narrowed or blocked blood vessel, while hemorrhagic stroke results from a ruptured blood vessel. A very brief interruption of blood supply to the brain usually without lasting effects is called a ministroke or a transient ischemic attack.

… people at risk for stroke should be evaluated for surgery to open up blockages in the arteries of the neck.— Jay Siwek, The Washington Post, 22 June 1999 Partial paralysis and speech difficulties often follow these strokes.— Bruce Bower, Science News, 25 Feb. 1984 stroke survivors

called also apoplexy, brain attack, cerebral accident, cerebrovascular accident

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