stereotype

verb
ste·​reo·​type | \ ˈster-ē-ə-ˌtīp How to pronounce stereotype (audio) , ˈstir- \
stereotyped; stereotyping; stereotypes

Definition of stereotype

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to make a stereotype from
2a : to repeat without variation : make hackneyed
b : to develop a mental stereotype about

stereotype

noun

Definition of stereotype (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a plate cast from a printing surface
2 : something conforming to a fixed or general pattern especially : a standardized mental picture that is held in common by members of a group and that represents an oversimplified opinion, prejudiced attitude, or uncritical judgment

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Other Words from stereotype

Verb

stereotyper noun

What is the Difference Between cliché and stereotype?

The words cliché and stereotype have a good deal in common. Both come from French, both were originally printers’ terms, and both have come to take on somewhat negative meanings in modern use.

Their original meanings are essentially synonymous, referring to printing blocks from which numerous prints could be made. In fact, cliché means stereotype in French. Their modern meanings, however, are quite distinct. Cliché is today overwhelmingly encountered in reference to something hackneyed, such as an overly familiar or commonplace phrase, theme, or expression. Stereotype is most frequently now employed to refer to an often unfair and untrue belief that many people have about all people or things with a particular characteristic.

Examples of stereotype in a Sentence

Verb It's not fair to stereotype a whole group of people based on one person you don't like. movies have stereotyped the hooker with a heart of gold ad nauseam Noun the stereotype of the absentminded professor the noble savage was a stereotype that appealed to 18th-century intellectuals, who viewed European civilization as decadent and corrupt
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb More broadly, Button wrote, people tend to stereotype older workers as inflexible, unambitious, physically and cognitively weak, and bad with technology. Washington Post, "The first millennials turn 40 on Jan. 1. That’s old enough to sue for age discrimination.," 29 Dec. 2020 In late September, the group members opened their workbooks and listed the ways conservatives and liberals stereotype each other. WSJ, "Abortion, Guns and Trump: A Church Group Tries to Navigate America’s Divisions," 18 Dec. 2020 To win primaries this year, most Republican candidates tried to prove their conservative and pro-Trump bona fides—but especially women, whom voters tend to stereotype as more moderate than their male colleagues. Naomi Nix, Bloomberg.com, "Today’s Republican Women Are Running Hard to the Right," 25 Sep. 2020 Blackface originated in the 19th century as a way for white actors to stereotype black Americans. James Brooks, Anchorage Daily News, "Alaska House candidate dressed in blackface in 2012," 12 June 2020 Trying to reclaim a part of themselves that has been shunned and stereotyped. al, "Alabama artist’s sculpture on display in Chicago park," 17 Jan. 2020 Salespeople can also be stereotyped as pushy, smooth-talking, or dishonest. Jackie Pilossoph, chicagotribune.com, "Column: This holiday season, give a knowing nod to the salespeople in your life," 5 Dec. 2019 Take Bakersfield, a city that has long been stereotyped as a place of smog and economic malaise. Tim Arango, BostonGlobe.com, "In prosperous California, anxiety over inequality abounds," 29 Feb. 2020 Young people of color, young Asian men who are wildly open to the avant-garde, new dandies who refuse to be stereotyped as belonging to any class—the entire choir of voices who are infinitely expanding the sense of what gender identity is. Vogue, "Vogue Runway’s Critics Weigh In on the Fall 2019 Menswear Collections—And the Seismic Shifts Changing the Business," 22 Jan. 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Power is often associated with our culture’s stereotype of the masculine ideal. Elizabeth Gulino, refinery29.com, "Why Is Hollywood Obsessed With Killer Mums?," 25 Nov. 2020 Dickerson also had an intellectual curiosity that belied the stereotype of a burly offensive lineman. Mike Rodak | Mrodak@al.com, al, "The stories behind the grit, smarts Landon Dickerson brings to Alabama," 17 Dec. 2020 In another tweet, Socino mocked circumcision and made reference to the stereotype of Jews being cheap. Jta Staff, sun-sentinel.com, "Argentinian rugby players suspended after anti-Semitic tweets discovered, but reinstated days later," 9 Dec. 2020 The famous firm embodied every stereotype of Wall Street’s clubby culture. Jeff John Roberts, Fortune, "Wall Street culture clash: When Coinbase met Cantor Fitzgerald," 3 Dec. 2020 That was a bit of this stereotype of the Asian with a slide rule. David Marchese, New York Times, "Yo-Yo Ma and the Meaning of Life," 20 Nov. 2020 Obama took issue with Trump's treatment of reporters and at numerous times admonished the president's threats against the media as being below the dignity of a common Florida stereotype. Spencer Neale, Washington Examiner, "'You ain't all that tough': Obama mocks Trump over 60 Minutes interview," 24 Oct. 2020 In its 546 pages, Crouch told his story from the perspective of a white female jazz singer from South Dakota – the antithesis of jazz stereotype and quite a stretch from Crouch’s own persona. Howard Reich, chicagotribune.com, "Column: Remembering Stanley Crouch, a courageous voice who confronted truth," 28 Sep. 2020 On the lighter side, A Very Secret Service (Netflix) is both hilarious and unsettlingly true to the stereotype of the French government. Ars Staff, Ars Technica, "What we’re binging: TV, films, and streams that bring comfort in a weird year," 26 Nov. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'stereotype.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of stereotype

Verb

1804, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Noun

1817, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for stereotype

Noun

French stéréotype, from stéré- stere- + type

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Time Traveler for stereotype

Time Traveler

The first known use of stereotype was in 1804

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Statistics for stereotype

Last Updated

8 Jan 2021

Cite this Entry

“Stereotype.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/stereotype. Accessed 17 Jan. 2021.

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More Definitions for stereotype

stereotype

verb
How to pronounce stereotype (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of stereotype

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to believe unfairly that all people or things with a particular characteristic are the same

stereotype

noun

English Language Learners Definition of stereotype (Entry 2 of 2)

: an often unfair and untrue belief that many people have about all people or things with a particular characteristic

stereotype

noun
ste·​reo·​type | \ ˈster-ē-ə-ˌtīp How to pronounce stereotype (audio) , ˈstir- \

Kids Definition of stereotype

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a fixed idea that many people have about a thing or a group that may often be untrue or only partly true

stereotype

verb
ste·​reo·​type
stereotyped; stereotyping

Kids Definition of stereotype (Entry 2 of 2)

: to form a fixed and often untrue or only partly true idea about It's unfair to stereotype people according to where they live.

stereotype

noun
ste·​reo·​type | \ ˈster-ē-ə-ˌtīp How to pronounce stereotype (audio) , ˈstir- How to pronounce stereotype (audio) \

Medical Definition of stereotype

: something conforming to a fixed or general pattern especially : an often oversimplified or biased mental picture held to characterize the typical individual of a group

Other Words from stereotype

stereotype transitive verb stereotyped; stereotyping

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Comments on stereotype

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