relegate

verb
rel·​e·​gate | \ ˈre-lə-ˌgāt How to pronounce relegate (audio) \
relegated; relegating

Definition of relegate

transitive verb

1 : to send into exile : banish
2 : assign: such as
a : to assign to a place of insignificance or of oblivion : put out of sight or mind
b : to assign to an appropriate place or situation on the basis of classification or appraisal
c : to submit to someone or something for appropriate action : delegate
d : to transfer (a sports team) to a lower ranking division

Other Words from relegate

relegation \ ˌre-​lə-​ˈgā-​shən How to pronounce relegate (audio) \ noun

Choose the Right Synonym for relegate

commit, entrust, confide, consign, relegate mean to assign to a person or place for a definite purpose. commit may express the general idea of delivering into another's charge or the special sense of transferring to a superior power or to a special place of custody. committed the felon to prison entrust implies committing with trust and confidence. the president is entrusted with broad powers confide implies entrusting with great assurance or reliance. confided complete control of my affairs to my attorney consign suggests removing from one's control with formality or finality. consigned the damaging notes to the fire relegate implies a consigning to a particular class or sphere often with a suggestion of getting rid of. relegated to an obscure position in the company

Did you know?

Originally relegate meant "to send into exile, banish". So when you relegate an old sofa to the basement, you're sending it to home-decorating Siberia. When confronted with a matter that no one really wants to face, a chief executive may relegate it to a committee "for further study", which may manage to ignore it for years. It may be annoying to read a newspaper article about a pet project and find that your own contributions have been relegated to a short sentence near the end.

Examples of relegate in a Sentence

The bill has been relegated to committee for discussion. courtiers and generals who incurred the emperor's disfavor were soon relegated to the farther reaches of the empire
Recent Examples on the Web Afro-Latinx people are tired of being told to keep supporting projects that relegate them to the sidelines and to keep waiting their turn, Chapman said. Harmeet Kaur, CNN, 16 June 2021 The absence of such performance benchmarking would relegate the alliance's intent to a mere marketing stunt. Frank Van Gansbeke, Forbes, 4 Nov. 2021 Democrats who control the legislature have adopted a map with lines that squiggle snake-like across the state to swoop up Democratic voters and relegate Republicans to a few districts. David A. Lieb And Nicholas Riccardi, Anchorage Daily News, 10 Nov. 2021 Democrats who control the legislature have adopted a map with lines that squiggle snake-like across the state to swoop up Democratic voters and relegate Republicans to a few districts. chicagotribune.com, 10 Nov. 2021 But Marvel only needed a year to relegate Thanos into a lower tier of villains. Chris Smith, BGR, 14 Nov. 2021 But nowadays, Saraiva says, many people overlook the importance of smell and often relegate it to something more aesthetic than anything else. Annie Melchor, Scientific American, 29 Oct. 2021 In the South, balmy temperatures nearly always relegate some of those images to the imagination. Krissa Rossbund, Better Homes & Gardens, 22 Oct. 2021 Rather than relegate this responsibility to a chief information officer or a chief digital officer, the narrower scope of a chief automation officer might provide the focus needed to unite all of the stakeholders under a common set of goals. Jakob Freund, Forbes, 4 Oct. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'relegate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of relegate

1599, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for relegate

Latin relegatus, past participle of relegare, from re- + legare to send with a commission — more at legate

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Time Traveler for relegate

Time Traveler

The first known use of relegate was in 1599

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Dictionary Entries Near relegate

relegable

relegate

relegitimize

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Statistics for relegate

Last Updated

19 Jan 2022

Cite this Entry

“Relegate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/relegate. Accessed 25 Jan. 2022.

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More Definitions for relegate

relegate

verb

English Language Learners Definition of relegate

: to put (someone or something) in a lower or less important position, rank, etc.
: to give (something, such as a job or responsibility) to another person or group
: to move (a sports team) to a lower position in a league

More from Merriam-Webster on relegate

Nglish: Translation of relegate for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of relegate for Arabic Speakers

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