quiet

noun
qui·​et | \ ˈkwī-ət How to pronounce quiet (audio) \

Definition of quiet

 (Entry 1 of 4)

: the quality or state of being quiet (see quiet entry 2) : tranquility
on the quiet
: in a secretive manner : in secret

quiet

adjective

Definition of quiet (Entry 2 of 4)

1a : marked by little or no motion or activity : calm a quiet sea
b : gentle, easygoing a quiet temperament
c : not interfered with quiet reading
d : enjoyed in peace and relaxation a quiet cup of tea
2a : free from noise or uproar : still
b : unobtrusive, conservative quiet clothes
3 : secluded a quiet nook

quiet

adverb

Definition of quiet (Entry 3 of 4)

: in a quiet manner an engine that runs quiet

quiet

verb
quieted; quieting; quiets

Definition of quiet (Entry 4 of 4)

transitive verb

1 : to cause to be quiet : calm
2 : to make secure by freeing from dispute or question quiet title to a property

intransitive verb

: to become quiet usually used with down

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Other Words from quiet

Adjective

quietly adverb
quietness noun

Examples of quiet in a Sentence

Noun My hostess told me she had some records I might like to hear and she called for quiet in the room. People sat down on the floor in groups, sharing bottles of wine and slivovitz. The host put the record on a windup record player and Lester Young's saxophone yowled out of the silence. — Maya Angelou, Gourmet, November 2002 When my parents needed peace and quiet, they didn't put me in front of the television to watch a "Baby Einstein" video; they plopped me in a chair to watch my mom do housework or cook. — Robb Moretti, Newsweek, 5 Aug. 2002 the quiet of a wooded trail Can I have some quiet here? I'm trying to study. I need a little peace and quiet. Adjective Breakfast at the Royal Bombay Yacht Club, a members-only institution founded in the city now called Mumbai in 1846 by British colonial officers, is a meal of quiet elegance. The second-story veranda looks out over a small garden and, beyond that, the Gateway of India and the Taj Mahal Hotel. Outside is the tumult of horse-drawn carriages, touts, and taxis. Inside is peaceful stillness, broken only by the sounds of crunched-on toast and rustling newspapers. — Lyla Bavadam, Saveur, October 2008 One change I notice is that I get sleepy earlier than I used to, sometimes by 8:30 or 9 if I am having a quiet evening at home. — Andrew Weil, Time, 17 Oct. 2005 I interviewed Virginia, who is totally blind, in a small local library. Walking with her guide dog, this young-looking woman arrived soon after I came in. We found a quiet corner to sit and talk while her dog settled beside her chair. At forty-three, Virginia was used to telling her story and found time for our interview in her busy travel schedule. She had just returned from San Francisco where she had spoken at the California Academy of Sciences and was about to leave for Montreal, Canada, to conduct workshops in diversity awareness. — Mary Grimley Mason, Working Against Odds, 2004 Attributing their behaviors to their personal dispositions, we decide Julie is shy and Jack is outgoing. Because people do have enduring personality traits, such attributions are sometimes valid. However, we often overestimate the influence of personality and underestimate the influence of situations. In class, Jack may be as quiet as Julie. Catch Julie at a party and you may hardly recognize your quiet classmate. — David G. Myers, Psychology, 2001 the quiet hum of the refrigerator He spoke in a very quiet voice. Surprisingly, the class was quiet. He's a very quiet person. She has a quiet disposition. During the morning, business was quiet. Some days at the store are quieter than others. a quiet stretch of road He led a quiet life. Adverb lie quiet and no one will guess you're hiding under the bed Verb Clemens had few questions to answer about Piazza. The beanball and broken bat from 2000, and the Mets' tepid retaliation last season, were memories. And since Clemens recorded his 300th victory on June 13, the buzz around him has quieted. — Tyler Kepner, New York Times, 29 June 2003 When she walked down the hall past his classroom, the sounds of chaos came over the frosted-glass pane above the door. She had taken to making random visits; the sight of her in the doorway quieted the kids. — Mary Gordon, Atlantic, May 1999 Even with that, Presser was so scared that he fled to Florida and moved from hotel to hotel till the gang war quieted down, with his side on top. — A. H. Raskin, New York Times Book Review, 10 Dec. 1989 the museum docent told the rowdy youngsters to quiet down for the tour quiet a crying toddler with candy
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Visitors head to the great castle hotels of Ireland and Great Britain looking to unwind in the quiet of pastoral surroundings. Peter Terzian, Travel + Leisure, "The Top 10 Resort Hotels in the U.K. and Ireland," 8 July 2020 Now, the throngs have vanished — and hopes that residents will rediscover the waterfront during the quiet are fading. Anna Kramer, SFChronicle.com, "Pandemic has Fisherman’s Wharf floundering amid hopes locals will replace absent tourists," 5 July 2020 Places with natural quiet are important to animals, as well, says Jesse Barber, associate professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at Boise State University. National Geographic, "Discover the planet’s last few ‘naturally quiet’ places," 17 June 2020 For residents who have railed against the noise pollution of recent years, the current quiet was too much, Roubos says, and people initially felt unsafe without people in the streets. Ciara Nugent, Time, "Why Amsterdam's Red Light District May Not Survive the Coronavirus Pandemic," 24 June 2020 In the United States, where protests had been marked by bouts of lawlessness since last week, relative quiet continued Thursday. BostonGlobe.com, "Sharpton decries oppression of Black Americans at George Floyd’s memorial," 4 June 2020 After 58 days of historic quiet, cards will be cut, dice will roll, and jackpots can jingle again at 12:01 a.m. Thursday in casinos in Las Vegas and Nevada. BostonGlobe.com, "The Latest: Tennessee’s Dollywood parks to open in mid-June," 3 June 2020 Then, in the quiet of a downtown under curfew, a century-old monument to a conflict older than Birmingham was no longer standing. William Thornton | Wthornton@al.com, al, "Of marches and monuments: 5 days in Alabama," 3 June 2020 Nathan Chapman, another longtime resident, knows the current peace and quiet comes at a cost. Kevin Mcgill, USA TODAY, "'An old neighborhood again': What New Orleans' French Quarter has been like without tourists," 1 June 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective But the quiet did not dull the fervor of the movement, now known as QAnon, that sprang up around that post and others laying out the sprawling, ever-shifting web of conspiracy theories and fantasies of impending authoritarian response. Melissa Gira Grant, The New Republic, "The Occult, Terrorizing Politics of QAnon," 3 Aug. 2020 Now, with each woman laid to rest and her mother’s apartment cleaned out, the reality and the quiet have set in. Dallas News, "After Dallas mother and daughter die of coronavirus hours apart, their family pleads: take COVID-19 seriously," 6 July 2020 With all of the quiet, and players being allowed to practice in shorts, Tuesday felt like a slow Sunday morning at any country club. Carlos Monarrez, Detroit Free Press, "Welcome back, Rocket Mortgage Classic. We definitely needed you," 30 June 2020 For nurses, the night shift is long stretches of quiet punctuated by crisis. Express-news Staff, ExpressNews.com, "Timeline of coronavirus in San Antonio: May and June," 30 June 2020 Few are likely happy about this, but the quiet does offer space for introspection and reflection. Ryan Kost, SFChronicle.com, "50 years of San Francisco Pride, from Stonewall to Black Lives Matter," 26 June 2020 By March 12, 1773, the quiet had been soundly disrupted in Virginia. Phillip Goodrich, Time, "As Confederate Statues Come Down, It's Worth Remembering That the Civil War Wasn't the Only American Conflict Involving Slavery," 22 June 2020 On the quiet, though, our heroes have an ulterior motive. Anthony Lane, The New Yorker, "Spike Lee Wraps History in Adventure in “Da 5 Bloods”," 12 June 2020 So everybody is going to have to be very, very, very quiet for Fudd to get close enough to, one assumes, chop Bugs Bunny's head off, Game of Thrones style. James Hibberd, EW.com, "Elmer Fudd won't use a gun in HBO Max's Looney Tunes reboot," 8 June 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Adverb The Stadio San Paolo, Napoli's famed crumbling colosseum, erupted as Mertens headed home from Adrian's save, only to fall quiet after seeing the linesman's flag raised for an obvious offside. Matias Grez, CNN, "Liverpool stunned by Napoli late goals in the Champions League," 17 Sep. 2019 Then, at some random moment, the atom goes quiet, signaling that the atom has entered the dark state. Chris Lee, Ars Technica, "Following Schrödinger’s cat to its death and giving it a reprieve," 5 June 2019 When the sun is up, the city center is crowded, but the streets empty as night falls, quiet except for the occasional sound of gunfire and rockets exploding on the outskirts of town. Najim Rahim, David Jolly And Ahmad Shakib, New York Times, "For Afghans in Kunduz, Taliban Assault Is Just the Latest Affront OCT. 7, 2015," 6 Feb. 2016 The boat goes quiet except for the occasional flap of the sail. Chris Jones, Esquire, "Vertigo," 15 Sep. 2010 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Zheng has played the role of enforcer on the global stage before, helping to quiet a famous 2011 uprising against local Communist Party leaders in the fishing village of Wukan, 150 kilometers (90 miles) up the coast. Bloomberg.com, "This Is the Hardliner China Chose to Oversee Hong Kong Security," 3 Aug. 2020 In 1952, when a 24-year-old Fleisher became the first American to win the Queen Elisabeth of Belgium International Music Competition, the applause was so raucous that a bell had to be rung to quiet the audience. Mckenna Oxenden, baltimoresun.com, "Leon Fleisher, renowned Baltimore concert pianist, dies at 92," 2 Aug. 2020 Parents need to stay calm and quiet the whole time, saying only the bare minimum to children about each step. Lucy (kathleen) Mcgoron, The Conversation, "Timeouts improve kids’ behavior if you do them the right way," 31 July 2020 Try mindful meditation, the simple practice of moment-to-moment awareness to quiet the mind and calm the body. Kelsey Hurwitz, Woman's Day, "18 Ways to Relax That Will Leave You Feeling Like a New Woman," 29 May 2020 Hopefully everyone can quiet down and listen to the babbling brook in the backyard for at least a minute of the vacay. Julianne Ross, CNN Underscored, "Here’s how safe it is to book a vacation rental right now," 9 July 2020 Officials in San Francisco are working to figure out a way to quiet a low hum coming from the famed Golden Gate Bridge that has become annoying to some residents. Fox News, "Golden Gate Bridge makes ‘screeching’ sound some say caused physiological distress: report," 3 July 2020 No one wants to hear from Ms. Rom, including the mayor, Chuck Novak, who nevertheless bangs his gavel dutifully and warns the growling crowd to quiet down. Jack Brook, The Christian Science Monitor, "Conservation vs. copper: Minnesota town debates its future with a mine," 2 July 2020 Williams, an advisor for QPI, believes a cultural shift is necessary to help people value and steward quiet in urban areas. National Geographic, "Discover the planet’s last few ‘naturally quiet’ places," 17 June 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'quiet.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of quiet

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined above

Adjective

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Adverb

1573, in the meaning defined above

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for quiet

Noun

Middle English quiet, quiete, borrowed from Anglo-French quiete, borrowed from Latin quiēt-, quiēs "repose, sleep, rest, peaceful conditions," going back to Indo-European *kwi̯eh1-ti-, noun derivative of a verbal base *kwi̯eh1- "have a rest," whence Avestan š́iiā- "be glad," Old Church Slavic počijǫ, počiti "to have a rest" (causative pokojǫ, pokoiti "to calm, quiet"), Armenian hangeaw "has rested," and (from deverbal *kwi̯eh1-to-) Avestan š́iiāta- "peaceful, happy," Old Persian šiyāta-, Latin quiētus "at rest, quiet entry 2"

Adjective

Middle English quyet, quyete, quiete, borrowed from Anglo-French & Middle French quiete, borrowed from Latin quiētus "at rest, inactive, peaceful" — more at quiet entry 1

Adverb

derivative of quiet entry 2

Verb

Middle English quieten, borrowed from Late Latin quiētāre "to become quiet, make quiet, put to rest," derivative of Latin quiētus "at rest, quiet entry 2"

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Time Traveler for quiet

Time Traveler

The first known use of quiet was in the 14th century

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Statistics for quiet

Last Updated

12 Jul 2020

Cite this Entry

“Quiet.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/quiet. Accessed 15 Aug. 2020.

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More Definitions for quiet

quiet

noun
How to pronounce quiet (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of quiet

 (Entry 1 of 3)

: the quality or state of being quiet or calm

quiet

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of quiet (Entry 2 of 3)

: making very little noise
: not talking
: tending not to talk very much

quiet

verb

English Language Learners Definition of quiet (Entry 3 of 3)

chiefly US : to make (someone or something) quieter, calmer, or less intense

quiet

noun
qui·​et | \ ˈkwī-ət How to pronounce quiet (audio) \

Kids Definition of quiet

 (Entry 1 of 4)

: the quality or state of being calm or without noise Can we please have some quiet?

quiet

adjective
quieter; quietest

Kids Definition of quiet (Entry 2 of 4)

1 : free from noise or uproar One step, two steps, onward they went … down that long, long quiet room.— Jeanne Birdsall, The Penderwicks
2 : marked by little or no motion or activity : calm quiet seas
3 : not disturbed : peaceful a quiet lunch
4 : tending not to talk or show excitement much a quiet child a quiet disposition
5 : not shown in an obvious way quiet determination
6 : away from public view : secluded a quiet corner

Other Words from quiet

quietly adverb Speak quietly.

quiet

adverb

Kids Definition of quiet (Entry 3 of 4)

: in a quiet manner : quietly The engine runs quiet.

quiet

verb
quieted; quieting

Kids Definition of quiet (Entry 4 of 4)

: to make or become calmer or less noisy She tried to quiet the crowd.

quiet

adjective
qui·​et

Legal Definition of quiet

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: free from disturbance, interference, or dispute (as from an adverse claim) quiet enjoyment of property

Legal Definition of quiet (Entry 2 of 2)

: to establish or make (title) secure by means of an action that produces a final determination of the respective rights of parties who are in dispute over property — compare cloud on title

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More from Merriam-Webster on quiet

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for quiet

Spanish Central: Translation of quiet

Nglish: Translation of quiet for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of quiet for Arabic Speakers

Comments on quiet

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