quiet

noun
qui·​et | \ ˈkwī-ət How to pronounce quiet (audio) \

Definition of quiet

 (Entry 1 of 4)

: the quality or state of being quiet (see quiet entry 2) : tranquility
on the quiet
: in a secretive manner : in secret

quiet

adjective

Definition of quiet (Entry 2 of 4)

1a : marked by little or no motion or activity : calm a quiet sea
b : gentle, easygoing a quiet temperament
c : not interfered with quiet reading
d : enjoyed in peace and relaxation a quiet cup of tea
2a : free from noise or uproar : still
b : unobtrusive, conservative quiet clothes
3 : secluded a quiet nook

quiet

adverb

Definition of quiet (Entry 3 of 4)

: in a quiet manner an engine that runs quiet

quiet

verb
quieted; quieting; quiets

Definition of quiet (Entry 4 of 4)

transitive verb

1 : to cause to be quiet : calm
2 : to make secure by freeing from dispute or question quiet title to a property

intransitive verb

: to become quiet usually used with down

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Other Words from quiet

Adjective

quietly adverb
quietness noun

Examples of quiet in a Sentence

Noun My hostess told me she had some records I might like to hear and she called for quiet in the room. People sat down on the floor in groups, sharing bottles of wine and slivovitz. The host put the record on a windup record player and Lester Young's saxophone yowled out of the silence. — Maya Angelou, Gourmet, November 2002 When my parents needed peace and quiet, they didn't put me in front of the television to watch a "Baby Einstein" video; they plopped me in a chair to watch my mom do housework or cook. — Robb Moretti, Newsweek, 5 Aug. 2002 the quiet of a wooded trail Can I have some quiet here? I'm trying to study. I need a little peace and quiet. Adjective Breakfast at the Royal Bombay Yacht Club, a members-only institution founded in the city now called Mumbai in 1846 by British colonial officers, is a meal of quiet elegance. The second-story veranda looks out over a small garden and, beyond that, the Gateway of India and the Taj Mahal Hotel. Outside is the tumult of horse-drawn carriages, touts, and taxis. Inside is peaceful stillness, broken only by the sounds of crunched-on toast and rustling newspapers. — Lyla Bavadam, Saveur, October 2008 One change I notice is that I get sleepy earlier than I used to, sometimes by 8:30 or 9 if I am having a quiet evening at home. — Andrew Weil, Time, 17 Oct. 2005 I interviewed Virginia, who is totally blind, in a small local library. Walking with her guide dog, this young-looking woman arrived soon after I came in. We found a quiet corner to sit and talk while her dog settled beside her chair. At forty-three, Virginia was used to telling her story and found time for our interview in her busy travel schedule. She had just returned from San Francisco where she had spoken at the California Academy of Sciences and was about to leave for Montreal, Canada, to conduct workshops in diversity awareness. — Mary Grimley Mason, Working Against Odds, 2004 Attributing their behaviors to their personal dispositions, we decide Julie is shy and Jack is outgoing. Because people do have enduring personality traits, such attributions are sometimes valid. However, we often overestimate the influence of personality and underestimate the influence of situations. In class, Jack may be as quiet as Julie. Catch Julie at a party and you may hardly recognize your quiet classmate. — David G. Myers, Psychology, 2001 the quiet hum of the refrigerator He spoke in a very quiet voice. Surprisingly, the class was quiet. He's a very quiet person. She has a quiet disposition. During the morning, business was quiet. Some days at the store are quieter than others. a quiet stretch of road He led a quiet life. Adverb lie quiet and no one will guess you're hiding under the bed Verb Clemens had few questions to answer about Piazza. The beanball and broken bat from 2000, and the Mets' tepid retaliation last season, were memories. And since Clemens recorded his 300th victory on June 13, the buzz around him has quieted. — Tyler Kepner, New York Times, 29 June 2003 When she walked down the hall past his classroom, the sounds of chaos came over the frosted-glass pane above the door. She had taken to making random visits; the sight of her in the doorway quieted the kids. — Mary Gordon, Atlantic, May 1999 Even with that, Presser was so scared that he fled to Florida and moved from hotel to hotel till the gang war quieted down, with his side on top. — A. H. Raskin, New York Times Book Review, 10 Dec. 1989 the museum docent told the rowdy youngsters to quiet down for the tour quiet a crying toddler with candy
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun New engine or not, the Q7 is library quiet at 70 mph. Tony Quiroga, Car and Driver, "Tested: 2020 Audi Q7 55 Is Quick and Quiet," 16 Mar. 2020 No one knows how long COVID-19 will hold people hostage in their homes out of caution, but Hollywood is keeping their fingers crossed that fans of their related franchises will still hit the theatres en masse after the global panic quiets. Ineye Komonibo, refinery29.com, "All The Hollywood Films Being Affected By The Coronavirus," 11 Mar. 2020 The only person in the store was James Kweku Essel, a friendly 57-year-old who had traded in his banking career for the peace and quiet of running the shop, according to his family members. Dan Morse, Washington Post, "After 28 years, police closed in on their murder suspect. Now he’s dead.," 13 Feb. 2020 The other fallacy is that peace and quiet will be a welcome relief from the incessant noise of 24/7 modern life. Ian Pannell, ABC News, "Covering coronavirus, then living in isolation: Reporter's notebook," 7 Mar. 2020 The luxury cruise ship, once bustling with busy restaurants, trivia game nights and Broadway-style shows, has been reduced to an eerie quiet. Hillary Leung, Time, "Passengers on a Virus-Stricken Cruise Ship in Japan Speak About Life Under Quarantine," 6 Feb. 2020 In the month since, an uneasy quiet has settled over the region. Laurie Kellman, Anchorage Daily News, "Trump faces impeachment accusers in State of the Union: What to watch for during his speech," 4 Feb. 2020 On the first of Muharram a solemn quiet fell over the city. The Economist, "Trapped in Iran," 28 Jan. 2020 Each strike of his mallet cuts through the relative quiet of the world's second-largest tropical rainforest. Jenny Marc, CNN, "How a library of tree DNA could protect the world's forests," 25 Nov. 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective After the excitement of the weekend, the National Weather Service said to expect quiet and seasonable weather on Monday and Tuesday. Sarah Brookbank, Cincinnati.com, "Cincinnati weather: Expect rain, thunderstorms and winds up to 50 mph this weekend," 27 Mar. 2020 Has any work been done to ensure that students can have a quiet and safe place to work during the day? Nicole Daniels, New York Times, "The Digital Divide: Researching the Challenges of Online Learning for Many Students," 27 Mar. 2020 Meanwhile, people stayed indoors throughout the city while the French Quarter, usually the city's thriving center, sat uncharacteristically quiet and nearly empty. USA TODAY, "Death rate soars in New Orleans coronavirus 'disaster' that could define city for generations," 27 Mar. 2020 Compared to average treadmills, this motor is extremely quiet and usable in a public environment. Tony Vaz, Popular Science, "Four standing desks for the modern office," 25 Mar. 2020 Chandra Irvin, the executive director of peace and spiritual renewal at Spalding University, told me we can all use this as an opportunity for us to quiet and center ourselves. Maggie Menderski, The Courier-Journal, "'God is bigger than this.' How Louisville is adjusting to a 'new normal' amid coronavirus," 17 Mar. 2020 There are just few people that touched so many lives in such a quiet and humble way. al, "Samford University professor who taught Old Testament for 46 years dies," 10 Mar. 2020 The institute’s polished corridors and seminar rooms are quiet, not yet broken in. Quanta Magazine, "The Man Making Rwanda Into a Hub for Physics," 3 Mar. 2020 Jones finished that round strong and the once-lively crowd became quiet and tense in anticipation of the final round. Fox News, "Jon Jones' UFC victory over Dominick Reyes is disputed," 10 Feb. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Adverb The Stadio San Paolo, Napoli's famed crumbling colosseum, erupted as Mertens headed home from Adrian's save, only to fall quiet after seeing the linesman's flag raised for an obvious offside. Matias Grez, CNN, "Liverpool stunned by Napoli late goals in the Champions League," 17 Sep. 2019 Then, at some random moment, the atom goes quiet, signaling that the atom has entered the dark state. Chris Lee, Ars Technica, "Following Schrödinger’s cat to its death and giving it a reprieve," 5 June 2019 When the sun is up, the city center is crowded, but the streets empty as night falls, quiet except for the occasional sound of gunfire and rockets exploding on the outskirts of town. Najim Rahim, David Jolly And Ahmad Shakib, New York Times, "For Afghans in Kunduz, Taliban Assault Is Just the Latest Affront OCT. 7, 2015," 6 Feb. 2016 The boat goes quiet except for the occasional flap of the sail. Chris Jones, Esquire, "Vertigo," 15 Sep. 2010 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb She’s instructed to quiet her mind (no books, no writing, no thinking), and is driven insane trying to prove her sanity. Leah Carroll, refinery29.com, "8 Books That Celebrate Complicated Women," 10 Mar. 2020 Royals management was furious with the decision, but were powerless to stop him But, the drama soon quieted and Jackson became known as perhaps the greatest athlete since Jim Thorpe. Bob Nightengale, USA TODAY, "Diamondbacks don't seem concerned about Madison Bumgarner's double-life on rodeo circuit as 'Mason Saunders'," 24 Feb. 2020 A day after Attorney General William Barr took to television in an effort to quiet worries over the political independence of the Justice Department, new developments fanned both sides of the argument. Sadie Gurman, WSJ, "New Developments Feed Debate on Justice Department Independence," 14 Feb. 2020 The first lesson every practitioner learns is how to quiet and focus his or her mind. David Canfield, EW.com, "Jim Butcher offers a sneak peek of upcoming novel Peace Talks," 16 Jan. 2020 One, Iran can quiet down and cease military provocations. Victor Davis Hanson, National Review, "Iran’s Options in a Showdown with America Are All Bad," 9 Jan. 2020 McAleenan waited for the chants to quiet down and tried to speak at least three times. BostonGlobe.com, "Acting homeland security chief booed off stage at Georgetown Law - The Boston Globe," 8 Oct. 2019 The man, a Trump supporter, agreed to quiet down and stay. Laurie Kellman, San Diego Union-Tribune, "Impeachment tests Democrats’ foothold in swing districts," 7 Oct. 2019 Not to leave himself with a sonic debt to the audience, Denève finished the piece, politely quieted the applause, and directed the musicians back to work. Peter Dobrin, Philly.com, "Nicholas Angelich joins Stéphane Denève and Philadelphia Orchestra on musical jaunts," 27 Apr. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'quiet.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of quiet

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined above

Adjective

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Adverb

1573, in the meaning defined above

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for quiet

Noun

Middle English quiet, quiete, borrowed from Anglo-French quiete, borrowed from Latin quiēt-, quiēs "repose, sleep, rest, peaceful conditions," going back to Indo-European *kwi̯eh1-ti-, noun derivative of a verbal base *kwi̯eh1- "have a rest," whence Avestan š́iiā- "be glad," Old Church Slavic počijǫ, počiti "to have a rest" (causative pokojǫ, pokoiti "to calm, quiet"), Armenian hangeaw "has rested," and (from deverbal *kwi̯eh1-to-) Avestan š́iiāta- "peaceful, happy," Old Persian šiyāta-, Latin quiētus "at rest, quiet entry 2"

Adjective

Middle English quyet, quyete, quiete, borrowed from Anglo-French & Middle French quiete, borrowed from Latin quiētus "at rest, inactive, peaceful" — more at quiet entry 1

Adverb

derivative of quiet entry 2

Verb

Middle English quieten, borrowed from Late Latin quiētāre "to become quiet, make quiet, put to rest," derivative of Latin quiētus "at rest, quiet entry 2"

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Time Traveler for quiet

Time Traveler

The first known use of quiet was in the 14th century

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Statistics for quiet

Last Updated

30 Mar 2020

Cite this Entry

“Quiet.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/quiet. Accessed 9 Apr. 2020.

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More Definitions for quiet

quiet

noun
How to pronounce quiet (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of quiet

 (Entry 1 of 3)

: the quality or state of being quiet or calm

quiet

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of quiet (Entry 2 of 3)

: making very little noise
: not talking
: tending not to talk very much

quiet

verb

English Language Learners Definition of quiet (Entry 3 of 3)

chiefly US : to make (someone or something) quieter, calmer, or less intense

quiet

noun
qui·​et | \ ˈkwī-ət How to pronounce quiet (audio) \

Kids Definition of quiet

 (Entry 1 of 4)

: the quality or state of being calm or without noise Can we please have some quiet?

quiet

adjective
quieter; quietest

Kids Definition of quiet (Entry 2 of 4)

1 : free from noise or uproar One step, two steps, onward they went … down that long, long quiet room.— Jeanne Birdsall, The Penderwicks
2 : marked by little or no motion or activity : calm quiet seas
3 : not disturbed : peaceful a quiet lunch
4 : tending not to talk or show excitement much a quiet child a quiet disposition
5 : not shown in an obvious way quiet determination
6 : away from public view : secluded a quiet corner

Other Words from quiet

quietly adverb Speak quietly.

quiet

adverb

Kids Definition of quiet (Entry 3 of 4)

: in a quiet manner : quietly The engine runs quiet.

quiet

verb
quieted; quieting

Kids Definition of quiet (Entry 4 of 4)

: to make or become calmer or less noisy She tried to quiet the crowd.

quiet

adjective
qui·​et

Legal Definition of quiet

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: free from disturbance, interference, or dispute (as from an adverse claim) quiet enjoyment of property

Legal Definition of quiet (Entry 2 of 2)

: to establish or make (title) secure by means of an action that produces a final determination of the respective rights of parties who are in dispute over property — compare cloud on title

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More from Merriam-Webster on quiet

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for quiet

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with quiet

Spanish Central: Translation of quiet

Nglish: Translation of quiet for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of quiet for Arabic Speakers

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