progress

noun
prog·​ress | \ ˈprä-grəs How to pronounce progress (audio) , -ˌgres, US also and British usually ˈprō-ˌgres \

Definition of progress

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a(1) : a royal journey marked by pomp and pageant
(2) : a state procession
b : a tour or circuit made by an official (such as a judge)
c : an expedition, journey, or march through a region
2 : a forward or onward movement (as to an objective or to a goal) : advance
3 : gradual betterment especially : the progressive development of humankind
in progress
: going on : occurring

progress

verb
pro·​gress | \ prə-ˈgres How to pronounce progress (audio) \
progressed; progressing; progresses

Definition of progress (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to move forward : proceed
2 : to develop to a higher, better, or more advanced stage

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Examples of progress in a Sentence

Noun the rapid progress of the ship He made slow progress down the steep cliff. The project showed slow but steady progress. Verb The project has been progressing slowly. The work is progressing and should be completed soon. The caravan progressed slowly across the desert.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun After a small amount of discussion about the progress the university had made, the subcommittee approved filing the audit Thursday. Emily Walkenhorst, Arkansas Online, "Audit by state at HSU finds 15 violations," 9 Oct. 2020 What the Rose Garden event also does — besides send an alarming message to the world about America’s seat of power — is corrupt the progress that the city has been making against this virus. Washington Post, "Just when D.C. had tackled the coronavirus, Trump upends the trend with a superspreader event," 8 Oct. 2020 The progress the Pelicans made that season was halted when Anthony Davis requested a trade midway through the following season. Christian Clark, NOLA.com, "Alvin Gentry is headed west: Former Pelicans coach to be a Kings assistant," 7 Oct. 2020 The development of treatments over the past 30 years reflects the amazing progress the field has made in tackling hepatitis C in a relatively short period of time. Anna Suk-fong Lok, The Conversation, "A researcher reflects on progress fighting hepatitis C – and a path forward," 5 Oct. 2020 In recent weeks, however, the case has become clouded in a murk of counter-accusations and leaked images that threatens to overshadow the progress Ms. Ashraf has made — and possibly even reverse it. Declan Walsh, New York Times, "The 22-Year-Old Force Behind Egypt’s Growing #MeToo Movement," 2 Oct. 2020 On the claims of a V-shaped recovery from his successor, current NEC Director Larry Kudlow, Cohn does not discount the progress that has been made. NBC News, "Small businesses, vital to economic recovery, are 'suffering,' former Trump adviser Gary Cohn says," 24 Sep. 2020 With that, Trump began a sustained defense of his record on immigration and border security, including talking about the progress his administration has made on the wall. W. James Antle Iii, Washington Examiner, "Trump campaign leaves immigration hawks wanting more," 21 Sep. 2020 Appearing on the Dan Patrick Show Friday morning, Scott reviewed the progress the Pac-12 made this week, from Wednesday’s approvals from Govs. oregonlive, "Larry Scott: Pac-12 has ‘overcome the major obstacles,’ doesn’t expect presidents and chancellors to vote Friday on resuming football," 18 Sep. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Florida State is pushing to progress to a point of being functional, while Notre Dame aspires to be elite. Eric Hansen, The Indianapolis Star, "Notre Dame football changes blocking schemes; offensive line aims for elite status," 7 Oct. 2020 Even if the bill fails to progress, however, the legislation could become the basis for another stimulus round if Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden wins the White House and Democrats gain control of the Senate. Aimee Picchi, CBS News, "$2.2 trillion HEROES Act would provide second round of stimulus checks," 6 Oct. 2020 Infectious-disease experts say that deaths usually lag behind cases and other indicators because severe cases of the disease can take weeks to progress. Konrad Putzier, WSJ, "New U.S. Coronavirus Cases Hit Nearly 50,000," 4 Oct. 2020 Costello threw five touchdown passes but also two interceptions, providing motivation to progress and keep the high-octane system humming. Mark Heim | Mheim@al.com, al, "No. 16 Mississippi State-Arkansas live stream (10/3): How to watch college football online, TV, time," 3 Oct. 2020 But with so many newcomers, this group will have to progress at its own pace, and Auriemma is more than okay with that. Alexa Philippou, courant.com, "With seven new players, UConn women are focusing on taking things slow on the practice court, but already sense a competitive edge and ‘different energy’ among particularly close-knit group," 3 Oct. 2020 Additional obstacles to progress include the looming U.S. presidential election, which is consuming the White House’s attention. Chris Horton, Bloomberg.com, "Taiwan Eases U.S. Meat Limits in Step Toward Trade Talks," 28 Aug. 2020 Larson said if plans progress, the city and council will be involved. Katie Galioto, Star Tribune, "Duluth Entertainment Convention Center (DECC) and Visit Duluth consider merging," 19 Sep. 2020 As the months progress, VOMA plans to open additional galleries to help accommodate such a diversity of artists. Jennifer Nalewicki, Smithsonian Magazine, "The World’s First Entirely Virtual Art Museum Is Open for Visitors," 17 Sep. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'progress.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of progress

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a(1)

Verb

1539, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for progress

Noun

Middle English, from Anglo-French progrés, from Latin progressus advance, from progredi to go forth, from pro- forward + gradi to go — more at pro-, grade entry 1

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Time Traveler for progress

Time Traveler

The first known use of progress was in the 15th century

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Statistics for progress

Last Updated

14 Oct 2020

Cite this Entry

“Progress.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/progress. Accessed 26 Oct. 2020.

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More Definitions for progress

progress

noun
How to pronounce progress (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of progress

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: movement forward or toward a place
: the process of improving or developing something over a period of time

progress

verb
How to pronounce progress (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of progress (Entry 2 of 2)

: to move forward in time
: to improve or develop over a period of time
formal : to move forward or toward a place

progress

noun
prog·​ress | \ ˈprä-grəs How to pronounce progress (audio) , -ˌgres \

Kids Definition of progress

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : the act of moving toward a goal The ship made rapid progress.
2 : gradual improvement He's not a good reader, but he is making progress.
in progress
: happening at the present time The trial is in progress.

progress

verb
pro·​gress | \ prə-ˈgres How to pronounce progress (audio) \
progressed; progressing

Kids Definition of progress (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to move forward in place or time : advance The story progresses.
2 : to move toward a higher, better, or more advanced stage

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Comments on progress

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