pine

noun, often attributive
\ ˈpīn How to pronounce pine (audio) \

Definition of pine

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : any of a genus (Pinus of the family Pinaceae, the pine family) of coniferous evergreen trees that have slender elongated needles and include some valuable timber trees and ornamentals
2 : the straight-grained white or yellow usually durable and resinous wood of a pine varying from extreme softness in the white pine to hardness in the longleaf pine
3 : any of various Australian coniferous trees (as of the genera Callitris or Araucaria)
4 : pineapple

pine

verb
pined; pining

Definition of pine (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to lose vigor, health, or flesh (as through grief) : languish
2 : to yearn intensely and persistently especially for something unattainable they still pined for their lost wealth

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Other Words from pine

Noun

piney or less commonly piny \ ˈpī-​nē How to pronounce pine (audio) \ adjective

Choose the Right Synonym for pine

Verb

long, yearn, hanker, pine, hunger, thirst mean to have a strong desire for something. long implies a wishing with one's whole heart and often a striving to attain. longed for some rest yearn suggests an eager, restless, or painful longing. yearned for a stage career hanker suggests the uneasy promptings of unsatisfied appetite or desire. always hankering for money pine implies a languishing or a fruitless longing for what is impossible. pined for a lost love hunger and thirst imply an insistent or impatient craving or a compelling need. hungered for a business of his own thirsted for power

Examples of pine in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun It’s not uncommon to find an entire subdivision burned to the ground while large pine trees loom nearby relatively unscathed. San Diego Union-Tribune, "Newsom’s $1B wildfire plan favors Sierra Nevada logging over homeowners," 30 Apr. 2021 For instance, the Pacific Northwest has an abundance of tall pine trees, while the Southeast is marked by maple and elm trees and a distinct amount of sand or soil in the roadside grass. Will Backus, Wired, "People Are Playing a Guessing Game in Google Maps," 16 Apr. 2021 At the end of Thursday at the Masters, the scoreboards displayed the usual first-day bouillabaisse of front-runners, while the more intriguing stories lurked well behind the leaders — and sometimes behind pine trees and azalea bushes. Star Tribune, "So-called favorites stray early at the Masters," 8 Apr. 2021 On the 18th on Sunday, Cink’s tee shot landed in the pine straw off the fairway, and his play to the green left him with a 50-foot downhill putt on the par-4 hole. Mark Inabinett | Minabinett@al.com, al, "Florence’s Stewart Cink shines at Masters with son’s help," 12 Apr. 2021 With Williams on the pine and poor Luke Kornet getting rag-dolled by Embiid, Philly went on a 21-2 run and Stevens called for Tacko to guard Philadelphia’s behemoth center. BostonGlobe.com, "Larry Bird vs. Dr. J this is not; Celtics-76ers rivalry is now one-sided," 6 Apr. 2021 Prechtel, who rode the pine the entire first half, turned in a performance for the ages. Scott Ostler, San Francisco Chronicle, "Defining moments for Stanford women on the road to Sunday's national championship game," 4 Apr. 2021 The pine doesn’t have a magnolia’s flowers or an oak’s shade. Washington Post, "The ‘brown gold’ that falls from pine trees in North Carolina," 31 Mar. 2021 The pine was named for Louis Morris, who had been a timber cruiser for the company. Rex Nelson, Arkansas Online, "OPINION | REX NELSON: Ode to a tree," 20 Dec. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Microsoft signed on to buy 200,000 offsets when SilviaTerra opened its market to pine growers in 11 Southern states. Ryan Dezember, WSJ, "New Carbon Market Pays Southern Pine-Growers Not to Cut," 20 Apr. 2021 Bridgerton, Shonda Rhimes' groundbreaking debut series for Netflix, has stolen hearts, sending endless fans to pine for high tea in the English countryside. Flora Tsapovsky, Southern Living, "Dreaming of Mingling with the Bridgertons? This Tea Service Is the Next Best Thing," 9 Apr. 2021 The dispersal of nuclear know-how in recent decades has led many observers to pine for the relative stability of the Cold War. Andre Pagliarini, The New Republic, "The Book That Stopped an Outbreak of Nuclear War," 16 Apr. 2021 Some of us still pine for the original Güero’s hamburguesa, a messy double dripping with American cheese, surrounded by a moat of Juanita’s tortillas chips. Michael Russell, oregonlive, "7 great burgers that didn’t quite fit our smash ranking (but you still need to try)," 30 Mar. 2021 As much as Tottenham fans may pine for their Argentinian former coach, that is now water under the bridge. Joshua Law, Forbes, "‘Disgrace’ In Zagreb: How Will Tottenham Resolve Issues That Run Deeper Than Mourinho?," 19 Mar. 2021 This week, there’s a new product for pickup enthusiasts to pine after. Stan Horaczek, Popular Science, "Canoo’s upcoming electric pickup truck will offer modular storage and adorable aesthetics," 11 Mar. 2021 In addition, wind storms, drought and the felling of trees that had fallen victim to pine beetles or disease, caused the loss of another 6.9 hectares (17 acres) in the reserve, bringing the total forest loss in 2020 to 20.65 hectares (51 acres). Mark Stevenson, Star Tribune, "Monarch butterflies down 26% in Mexico wintering grounds," 25 Feb. 2021 To pine for it is to be whipsawed between hope and despair. Kurt Streeter, New York Times, "Houston, Seattle Feels Your Loss," 15 Jan. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'pine.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of pine

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for pine

Noun

Middle English, from Old English pīn, from Latin pinus; probably akin to Greek pitys pine

Verb

Middle English, from Old English pīnian to suffer, from *pīn punishment, from Latin poena — more at pain entry 1

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Time Traveler for pine

Time Traveler

The first known use of pine was before the 12th century

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Statistics for pine

Last Updated

4 May 2021

Cite this Entry

“Pine.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/pine. Accessed 7 May. 2021.

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More Definitions for pine

pine

noun

English Language Learners Definition of pine

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a tree that has long, thin needles instead of leaves and that stays green throughout the year
: the wood of a pine tree that is often used to make furniture

pine

verb

English Language Learners Definition of pine (Entry 2 of 2)

: to become thin and weak because of sadness or loss

pine

noun
\ ˈpīn How to pronounce pine (audio) \

Kids Definition of pine

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: an evergreen tree that has cones, narrow needles for leaves, and a wood that ranges from very soft to hard

pine

verb
pined; pining

Kids Definition of pine (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to become thin and weak because of sadness or worry
2 : to long for very much She pined for home.

pine

noun
\ ˈpīn How to pronounce pine (audio) \

Medical Definition of pine

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: any tree of the genus Pinus

pine

noun

Medical Definition of pine (Entry 2 of 2)

: a dietary deficiency disease of sheep or cattle marked by anemia, malnutrition, and general debility specifically : such a disease due to cobalt deficiency — compare morton mains disease

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Comments on pine

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