magic

noun
mag·​ic | \ ˈma-jik How to pronounce magic (audio) \

Definition of magic

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1a : the use of means (such as charms or spells) believed to have supernatural power over natural forces
b : magic rites or incantations
2a : an extraordinary power or influence seemingly from a supernatural source Both pitchers, although they are older, haven't lost their magic.
b : something that seems to cast a spell : enchantment all the mystery, magic and romance which belong to royalty alone— J. E. P. Grigg
3 : the art of producing illusions by sleight of hand entertained with acts of jugglery and magic

magic

adjective

Definition of magic (Entry 2 of 3)

1 : of or relating to magic
2a : having seemingly supernatural qualities or powers
b : giving a feeling of enchantment

magic

verb
magicked; magicking

Definition of magic (Entry 3 of 3)

transitive verb

: to produce, remove, or influence by magic

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Examples of magic in a Sentence

Noun children who believe in magic a book that explains how to do magic Both pitchers, though they are older, haven't lost their magic. Adjective a magic potion that makes you able to fly There is no magic solution to these problems.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun But somehow, there’s this magic projected to the camera. Hugh Hart, Fortune, "‘Irishman’ DP Rodrigo Prieto on mastering Martin Scorsese’s cinematic language," 5 Feb. 2020 Erasing kids from the elements of play drains all the potential magic from this show, leaving us with mere Peter Pan dregs. Robyn Bahr, The Hollywood Reporter, "'Lego Masters': TV Review," 4 Feb. 2020 The police filmed all this, using sweepy drone shots and a little Bollywood magic. New York Times, "Mumbai Police Play a Trick on Honking Drivers," 4 Feb. 2020 This time, the magic didn’t emerge so much from the gown’s mysterious clinging powers (the two decades that had passed had opened our eyes to some of fashion’s tricks) but, rather, from Lopez’s own resilience. Naomi Fry, The New Yorker, "The Super Bowl Halftime Show, and the Ageless Comforts of J. Lo.," 3 Feb. 2020 Children can also delight in Pirouette, who dances en pointe in her musical magic box. Kimi Robinson, azcentral, "Arizona Renaissance Festival is an escape from modern life. Here's what's on tap this year," 3 Feb. 2020 And that magic doesn't just stop with rescuing old relics in those small towns. CBS News, "Mike Wolfe on rescuing America's past," 2 Feb. 2020 One' is the magic average number, the most desirable result. Klara Glowczewska, Town & Country, "What You Need to Know About Coronavirus and Travel," 1 Feb. 2020 One of the hallmarks of Detroit-style is frico, the magic that happens when the cheese on a pizza runs over the sides and crisps on the edge of the pan. Tom Sietsema, Washington Post, "Emmy Squared finds diners opening wide for Detroit-style pizza," 31 Jan. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective Enjoy cultural experiences, such as a Japanese tea ceremony, and watch a grand kagura performance (Japanese magic trick show) in the sake lounge. Anna Chittenden, Condé Nast Traveler, "Where to Stay in Tokyo for the 2020 Olympics," 30 Jan. 2020 Their data can be used to exploit as well as help them FOR THOSE seeking to help the worst-off in poor countries, the mobile phone has been a magic weapon. The Economist, "Poverty and privacy How digital financial services can prey upon the poor," 29 Jan. 2020 Like clockwork, a magic moment clicks into time at Lake Berryessa at the end of October. Tom Stienstra, SFChronicle.com, "Everything you need to know to visit Lake Berryessa in fall," 18 Oct. 2019 No magic number Some council members were disappointed the nearly 400-page study didn’t give the number of officers needed for the police department to be fully staffed. Cassandra Jaramillo, Dallas News, "Dallas police Chief U. Renée Hall back from medical leave, aiming to cure what ails her department," 26 Aug. 2019 But these magic uniforms, worn today by roughly 64,000 Delta employees, including flight attendants, Sky Club staff, gate agents, and so on, have additional, much more concerning properties. Natasha Frost, Quartz, "Delta flight attendants say their high-tech uniforms are making them sick," 4 Jan. 2020 Baby Yoda raises his little paw, but no magic results. Spencer Kornhaber, The Atlantic, "The Mandalorian Knows Why Heroes Wear Masks," 30 Dec. 2019 Immediately off the backyard, which backs up to the Golden Peak base area and is surrounded by old-growth aspen and spruce trees, are the Gopher Hill chairlift and Elvis Bahn magic carpet that service beginner-level skiers. Liv Sotheby's International Realty, The Denver Post, "A timeless luxury, 375 Mill Creek Circle is Vail’s premier ski-in/ski-out property," 20 Dec. 2019 Magic isn't an easy business, said Brent Braun, who owns J&B Magic Shop and Theater in New Albany, Indiana, and doubles as a magic consultant. Maggie Menderski, The Courier-Journal, "'A Different Way of Thinking': Louisville magician wows crowd with tricks, autism advocacy," 19 Dec. 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The editor tried to magic away the controversy by claiming that the essay had been intended as satire, an obvious lie. Kevin D. Williamson, National Review, "The New Republic’s Mayor Pete Problem," 16 July 2019 It’s hard to see how wanting to magic away their beliefs is compatible with an expansive vision of tolerance that would bring ideological balance to secular universities. Alan Levinovitz, Slate Magazine, "Today’s political climate doesn’t require more tolerance. It requires less.," 20 Mar. 2017 Brewers’ efforts to magic up a new daypart for beer come as sales of the beverage are falling, both in the U.S. and world-wide. Lara O’reilly, WSJ, "CMO Today: WPP Suffers Hack; Brunch Beer; Verizon Pursues Carrier Data Tie-Ups," 28 June 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'magic.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of magic

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Adjective

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1906, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for magic

Noun and Adjective

Middle English magique, from Middle French, from Latin magice, from Greek magikē, feminine of magikos Magian, magical, from magos magus, sorcerer, of Iranian origin; akin to Old Persian maguš sorcerer

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Time Traveler for magic

Time Traveler

The first known use of magic was in the 14th century

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Statistics for magic

Last Updated

8 Feb 2020

Cite this Entry

“Magic.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/magic?show=0&t=1297499612. Accessed 20 Feb. 2020.

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More Definitions for magic

magic

noun
How to pronounce magic (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of magic

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a power that allows people (such as witches and wizards) to do impossible things by saying special words or performing special actions
: tricks that seem to be impossible and that are done by a performer to entertain people
: special power, influence, or skill

magic

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of magic (Entry 2 of 2)

: having the power to make impossible things happen : having supernatural power
: involving the skill of doing tricks that seem to be impossible
: capable of producing good results very easily

magic

noun
mag·​ic | \ ˈma-jik How to pronounce magic (audio) \

Kids Definition of magic

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : the power to control natural forces possessed by certain persons (as wizards and witches) in folk tales and fiction
2 : the art or skill of performing tricks or illusions for entertainment
3 : a power that seems mysterious The team lost its magic.
4 : something that charms They calmed us with the magic of their singing.

magic

adjective

Kids Definition of magic (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : having or seeming to have the power to make impossible things happen She chanted the magic words.
2 : of or relating to the power to make impossible things happen magic tricks
3 : giving a feeling of enchantment It was a magic moment.

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More from Merriam-Webster on magic

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for magic

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with magic

Spanish Central: Translation of magic

Nglish: Translation of magic for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of magic for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about magic

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