sorcery

noun
sor·​cery | \ ˈsȯr-sə-rē How to pronounce sorcery (audio) , ˈsȯrs-rē \

Definition of sorcery

1 : the use of power gained from the assistance or control of evil spirits especially for divining : necromancy

Examples of sorcery in a Sentence

in olden times people suspected of sorcery were often put to death
Recent Examples on the Web Given the opportunity, Alan will add levity and sorcery to your life. Dennard Dayle, The New Yorker, 10 Mar. 2022 For Port and his team, the biggest challenge was combining Strange's trippy sorcery with Spidey's more tactile, almost gymnastic-like style. Devan Coggan, EW.com, 10 Mar. 2022 While tabletop RPGs are best known for their sword and sorcery tales, there are some great examples of other genres on the market. Rob Wieland, Forbes, 23 Dec. 2021 Sri Lanka’s president demoted the country’s health minister, who advocated for sorcery as a treatment for COVID-19. John R. Macarthur, Harpers Magazine, 7 Dec. 2021 By the documentary’s partly convincing logic, Dio’s sword-and-sorcery inclinations really were the ultimate exemplar of some kind of cred. Chris Willman, Variety, 23 Mar. 2022 The series featured two of my favorite players – Erving and Earvin Johnson, who appeared on my radar in the late 1970s at Michigan State with his basketball sorcery. Jeff Zillgitt, USA TODAY, 18 Feb. 2022 There are points in space where a quirk of physics borders on sorcery, where Earth and the sun have conspired to produce a special kind of equilibrium. Marina Koren, The Atlantic, 10 Dec. 2021 Mattel’s iconic sword-and-sorcery franchise began as a series of action figures and has seen multiple screen iterations. Mia Galuppo, The Hollywood Reporter, 28 Jan. 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'sorcery.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of sorcery

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for sorcery

Middle English sorcerie, from Anglo-French, from sorcer sorcerer, from Medieval Latin sortiarius, from Latin sort-, sors chance, lot — more at series

Learn More About sorcery

Time Traveler for sorcery

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The first known use of sorcery was in the 14th century

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Dictionary Entries Near sorcery

sorcerous

sorcery

Sordaria

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Statistics for sorcery

Last Updated

1 May 2022

Cite this Entry

“Sorcery.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/sorcery. Accessed 18 May. 2022.

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More Definitions for sorcery

sorcery

noun
sor·​cery | \ ˈsȯr-sə-rē How to pronounce sorcery (audio) \
plural sorceries

Kids Definition of sorcery

: the use of magic : witchcraft

More from Merriam-Webster on sorcery

Nglish: Translation of sorcery for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of sorcery for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about sorcery

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