magic

noun
mag·​ic | \ ˈma-jik How to pronounce magic (audio) \

Definition of magic

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1a : the use of means (such as charms or spells) believed to have supernatural power over natural forces
b : magic rites or incantations
2a : an extraordinary power or influence seemingly from a supernatural source Both pitchers, although they are older, haven't lost their magic.
b : something that seems to cast a spell : enchantment all the mystery, magic and romance which belong to royalty alone— J. E. P. Grigg
3 : the art of producing illusions by sleight of hand entertained with acts of jugglery and magic

magic

adjective

Definition of magic (Entry 2 of 3)

1 : of or relating to magic
2a : having seemingly supernatural qualities or powers
b : giving a feeling of enchantment

magic

verb
magicked; magicking

Definition of magic (Entry 3 of 3)

transitive verb

: to produce, remove, or influence by magic

Examples of magic in a Sentence

Noun children who believe in magic a book that explains how to do magic Both pitchers, though they are older, haven't lost their magic. Adjective a magic potion that makes you able to fly There is no magic solution to these problems.
Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The star also pulled off some wardrobe magic when her animal print ensemble disappeared during the performance, leaving her in a sparkly nude bodysuit. Amethyst Tate, Peoplemag, 8 Aug. 2022 Create magic by using learnings from virtual events to provide a hybrid experience. Mimi Flanders, Forbes, 2 Aug. 2022 The star also pulled off some wardrobe magic when her animal print ensemble disappeared during the performance, leaving her in a sparkly nude bodysuit. Shafiq Najib, PEOPLE.com, 31 July 2022 Mix up some magic for the whole family with this ice cream topping mixing kit, complete with a marble slab, two mixing spades, three ceramic dishes, and a bamboo base for everything to rest in. Brittney Morgan And Medgina Saint-elien, House Beautiful, 25 July 2022 The Thorns just demolished Gotham FC 5-0, and the Timbers pulled out a 1-1 draw against the Vancouver Whitecaps thanks to some Felipe Mora magic. oregonlive, 21 July 2022 Plus, the clock was ticking — the company was preparing to launch its do-or-die streaming service HBO Max and could really use some Thrones magic. James Hibberd, The Hollywood Reporter, 19 July 2022 Hovland, bogey-free for the round, showed off some magic of his own on the 17th by putting off the dirt path just short of the road, up the hill to about 5 feet for a par. Doug Ferguson, Chicago Tribune, 16 July 2022 These pieces all highlight the wondrous, almost magical process of fermentation, and perhaps will inspire you to make some fermentation magic of your own. Julia Skinner, Longreads, 16 July 2022 Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective That $1 million-per-episode figure remains the magic number for top TV talent. Michael Schneider, Variety, 25 July 2022 Many of us were told that $1M in retirement funds is the magic number for a successful retirement. Chris Carosa, Forbes, 18 July 2022 Find out why every decision matters (and why 13.5 is the magic number) here, or just follow the instructions below. Jason O'bryan, Robb Report, 25 June 2022 While Fitbit gives most users a 10,000 step goal each day, the magic number is different for everyone, depending on age, fitness level and other factors. Jacob Livesay, USA TODAY, 20 June 2022 Everything must be discovered, from peanut butter to rainstorms, and all things may as well be magic. Grant Tremblay, Scientific American, 11 July 2022 And one question kept repeating in my head, what is the magic number? Fox News Staff, Fox News, 10 July 2022 At the time, the commission stated that a magic number of units might be about 250. Drew Dawson, Journal Sentinel, 7 July 2022 Dick’s [00:02:00] sporting goods is gonna do the 4,000 must be the magic number $4,000 in travel. Laura Johnston, cleveland, 28 June 2022 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Buckley had a vast tonal range from which to choose in his musical palette, from deep trauma to horror to otherworldly magic. Jazz Tangcay, Variety, 14 July 2022 The auction house, through glossy catalogs and (increasingly) online offerings, can magic up artistic legitimacy that once only museums or scholars could assign. New York Times, 23 May 2022 The book opens the door to magic and brings readers inside its world by revealing the artistry, inside history, and fascinating traditions of a subject long shrouded in mystery. cleveland, 18 Mar. 2022 Like most restaurants, high-end sushi counters survived the earliest part of the pandemic by cutting all that magic away and focusing on takeout. New York Times, 4 Jan. 2022 Fragrances are highly evocative of times, places and memories, and can magic up many a Proustian moment. Kristin Larson, Forbes, 27 Apr. 2021 And the shots alone won’t magic away the scars of damaged tissue or the numbing heft of depression brought on by months of sickness. Katherine J. Wu, The Atlantic, 25 Mar. 2021 The editor tried to magic away the controversy by claiming that the essay had been intended as satire, an obvious lie. Kevin D. Williamson, National Review, 16 July 2019 It’s hard to see how wanting to magic away their beliefs is compatible with an expansive vision of tolerance that would bring ideological balance to secular universities. Alan Levinovitz, Slate Magazine, 20 Mar. 2017 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'magic.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of magic

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Adjective

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1906, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for magic

Noun and Adjective

Middle English magique, from Middle French, from Latin magice, from Greek magikē, feminine of magikos Magian, magical, from magos magus, sorcerer, of Iranian origin; akin to Old Persian maguš sorcerer

Learn More About magic

Time Traveler for magic

Time Traveler

The first known use of magic was in the 14th century

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Dictionary Entries Near magic

Magian

magic

magical

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Statistics for magic

Last Updated

13 Aug 2022

Cite this Entry

“Magic.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/magic. Accessed 13 Aug. 2022.

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More Definitions for magic

magic

noun
mag·​ic | \ ˈma-jik How to pronounce magic (audio) \

Kids Definition of magic

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : the power to control natural forces possessed by certain persons (as wizards and witches) in folk tales and fiction
2 : the art or skill of performing tricks or illusions for entertainment
3 : a power that seems mysterious The team lost its magic.
4 : something that charms They calmed us with the magic of their singing.

magic

adjective

Kids Definition of magic (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : having or seeming to have the power to make impossible things happen She chanted the magic words.
2 : of or relating to the power to make impossible things happen magic tricks
3 : giving a feeling of enchantment It was a magic moment.

More from Merriam-Webster on magic

Nglish: Translation of magic for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of magic for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about magic

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