magic

noun
mag·​ic | \ ˈma-jik How to pronounce magic (audio) \

Definition of magic

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1a : the use of means (such as charms or spells) believed to have supernatural power over natural forces
b : magic rites or incantations
2a : an extraordinary power or influence seemingly from a supernatural source Both pitchers, although they are older, haven't lost their magic.
b : something that seems to cast a spell : enchantment all the mystery, magic and romance which belong to royalty alone— J. E. P. Grigg
3 : the art of producing illusions by sleight of hand entertained with acts of jugglery and magic

magic

adjective

Definition of magic (Entry 2 of 3)

1 : of or relating to magic
2a : having seemingly supernatural qualities or powers
b : giving a feeling of enchantment

magic

verb
magicked; magicking

Definition of magic (Entry 3 of 3)

transitive verb

: to produce, remove, or influence by magic

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Examples of magic in a Sentence

Noun children who believe in magic a book that explains how to do magic Both pitchers, though they are older, haven't lost their magic. Adjective a magic potion that makes you able to fly There is no magic solution to these problems.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun To hear a crowd of people screaming along to that chorus is going to be absolute magic. Steve Baltin, Forbes, 3 June 2021 Just stare at a tree or a bee sniffing a flower—there's magic in that. Ying Chu, Marie Claire, 22 Apr. 2021 Jennifer Garner and Mark Ruffalo were pure rom-com magic in 2004's 13 Going on 30, but the world was nearly deprived of their glorious onscreen chemistry, the actress recently revealed. Kayleigh Roberts, Harper's BAZAAR, 20 Mar. 2021 For Southern bird lovers, there's magic in these mountains. Tracey Minkin, Southern Living, 9 Mar. 2021 Walk around downtown and visit the tropical birds at The Perch Brewery, stop in at Pedal Haus for lunch, then head up to SanTan Brewing's production facility to see how the magic is made. Tirion Morris, The Arizona Republic, 29 May 2021 The memories and magic that remain began when the baby was born. Tracy Smith, CBS News, 29 May 2021 The Boyce family is continuing to share some of Cameron's magic with the world through the Cameron Boyce Foundation which focuses on ending gun violence and curing epilepsy. Rosy Cordero, EW.com, 28 May 2021 Reagan brought out the magic in Baker in ways that H.W. Bush could not. John Tamny, Forbes, 27 May 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective Carp arrived with no guarantee of playing time but appeared in 86 games during that magic season. BostonGlobe.com, 12 June 2021 Check out the Elvis impersonator contest, watermelon relay, and Easterling magic show. Serena Puang, The Indianapolis Star, 12 June 2021 The drums sounding good in the song is a form of magic show. Naomi Fry, The New Yorker, 11 June 2021 Remember beginnings have power; beginnings are magic. Jimmy Jain, Forbes, 15 Apr. 2021 Gherardo Felloni, the creative director of Roger Vivier, knows that shoes can be magic, and a fabulous high heel is enough to make an evening one to remember. Lilah Ramzi, Vogue, 5 Apr. 2021 So many series become so intent on pulling off a shocking reveal that the final episode can feel more like a narrative magic trick than an actual resolution to the events that preceded it. Meredith Blake, Los Angeles Times, 30 May 2021 The magic ingredient is white willowbark, a natural beta hydroxy acid that calms inflammation, smooths texture and dissolves dead skin cells, working to exfoliate. Celia Shatzman, Forbes, 29 May 2021 Carnival rides, games, food vendors, petting zoo, magic show and more. Mary Colurso | Mcolurso@al.com, al, 28 May 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb And the shots alone won’t magic away the scars of damaged tissue or the numbing heft of depression brought on by months of sickness. Katherine J. Wu, The Atlantic, 25 Mar. 2021 The editor tried to magic away the controversy by claiming that the essay had been intended as satire, an obvious lie. Kevin D. Williamson, National Review, 16 July 2019 It’s hard to see how wanting to magic away their beliefs is compatible with an expansive vision of tolerance that would bring ideological balance to secular universities. Alan Levinovitz, Slate Magazine, 20 Mar. 2017 Brewers’ efforts to magic up a new daypart for beer come as sales of the beverage are falling, both in the U.S. and world-wide. Lara O’reilly, WSJ, 28 June 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'magic.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of magic

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Adjective

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1906, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for magic

Noun and Adjective

Middle English magique, from Middle French, from Latin magice, from Greek magikē, feminine of magikos Magian, magical, from magos magus, sorcerer, of Iranian origin; akin to Old Persian maguš sorcerer

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Learn More About magic

Time Traveler for magic

Time Traveler

The first known use of magic was in the 14th century

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Statistics for magic

Last Updated

14 Jun 2021

Cite this Entry

“Magic.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/magic. Accessed 19 Jun. 2021.

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More Definitions for magic

magic

noun

English Language Learners Definition of magic

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a power that allows people (such as witches and wizards) to do impossible things by saying special words or performing special actions
: tricks that seem to be impossible and that are done by a performer to entertain people
: special power, influence, or skill

magic

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of magic (Entry 2 of 2)

: having the power to make impossible things happen : having supernatural power
: involving the skill of doing tricks that seem to be impossible
: capable of producing good results very easily

magic

noun
mag·​ic | \ ˈma-jik How to pronounce magic (audio) \

Kids Definition of magic

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : the power to control natural forces possessed by certain persons (as wizards and witches) in folk tales and fiction
2 : the art or skill of performing tricks or illusions for entertainment
3 : a power that seems mysterious The team lost its magic.
4 : something that charms They calmed us with the magic of their singing.

magic

adjective

Kids Definition of magic (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : having or seeming to have the power to make impossible things happen She chanted the magic words.
2 : of or relating to the power to make impossible things happen magic tricks
3 : giving a feeling of enchantment It was a magic moment.

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