magic

1 of 3

noun

mag·​ic ˈma-jik How to pronounce magic (audio)
1
a
: the use of means (such as charms or spells) believed to have supernatural power over natural forces
b
: magic rites or incantations
2
a
: an extraordinary power or influence seemingly from a supernatural source
Both pitchers, although they are older, haven't lost their magic.
b
: something that seems to cast a spell : enchantment
all the mystery, magic and romance which belong to royalty aloneJ. E. P. Grigg
3
: the art of producing illusions by sleight of hand
entertained with acts of jugglery and magic

magic

2 of 3

adjective

1
: of or relating to magic
2
a
: having seemingly supernatural qualities or powers
b
: giving a feeling of enchantment

magic

3 of 3

verb

magicked; magicking

transitive verb

: to produce, remove, or influence by magic

Examples of magic in a Sentence

Noun children who believe in magic a book that explains how to do magic Both pitchers, though they are older, haven't lost their magic. Adjective a magic potion that makes you able to fly There is no magic solution to these problems.
Recent Examples on the Web
Noun
With 360° sound magic in every direction, there will be no corner of your room left untouched, no soul uninvited to the auditory party that’s about to break out. Stack Commerce, Popular Science, 15 Feb. 2024 Thank you from the bottom of my heart for this dream come true and for sprinkling your brilliance and magic on my little song @mariahcarey. Thania Garcia, Variety, 14 Feb. 2024 Despite being relatively new as an expanding chain stretching into the West, Voodoo is well-versed in marketing magic. Michael Deeds, Idaho Statesman, 13 Feb. 2024 The individuals in this room know better than anyone just how much time, hard work and heart goes into creating the magic that takes place when an artist takes the stage with a room full of fans. Jessica Nicholson, Billboard, 13 Feb. 2024 Yes, the legendary filmmaker and his Gen Z actress-daughter have been making magic on TikTok for a while. Rob Ledonne, Rolling Stone, 12 Feb. 2024 Penn & Teller are always great, and Criss Angel does the rock & roll version of magic. Megan Spurrell, Condé Nast Traveler, 9 Feb. 2024 El Pueblito Sayulita The magic of Sayulita is that travelers often come and then never want to leave. Meagan Drillinger, Travel + Leisure, 3 Feb. 2024 These new Fae bore elemental magic, strong enough to make Pelias wary of them. Megan McCluskey, TIME, 2 Feb. 2024
Adjective
Understanding the basics of this 'magic number' of net zero is crucial to better comprehend the term's nuances and potential impact on reducing global warming. Simi Thambi​, Forbes, 16 Feb. 2024 Courtesy of OpenAI The result is a convincing view of what is unmistakably Tokyo, in that magic moment when snowflakes and cherry blossoms coexist. Steven Levy, WIRED, 15 Feb. 2024 But who knows what’ll happen or who the magic buyer will be, because one of the secrets to Port Royal’s appeal is its secrecy. Byalena Botros, Fortune, 12 Feb. 2024 Saturn’s moon Titan has disappearing ‘magic islands’ that may be clumps of organic material The team suspects the ocean is about 12.4 miles to 18.6 miles (20 kilometers to 30 kilometers) deep beneath the moon’s ice shell. Ashley Strickland, CNN, 7 Feb. 2024 As her boiling pot begins to steam, magic floats to the surface: tang yuan—soft, doughy rice balls bobbing and swaying in a sugary soup. Catherine Duncan, Smithsonian Magazine, 7 Feb. 2024 This magic number is endorsed by big players in the wellness space, including Apple, which has launched an entire series of podcasts around 12-Minute Meditation, and supermodel favorite Bodyism. Fiona Embleton, Glamour, 24 Jan. 2024 The food menu includes magic snitch snacks, dragon’s tail soup and Forbidden Forest broccoli and cheese soup. Jenna Thompson, Kansas City Star, 1 Feb. 2024 You’re left with a magic shell, sundae-esque treat that’s infinitely riffable. Audrey Bruno, SELF, 1 Feb. 2024
Verb
Perhaps LLMs will be able to magic up individual articles about that content too: Joan reading an article about the latest episode of Joan Is Awful, which then becomes a scene in the next episode of Joan Is Awful, content about content about content. WIRED, 15 June 2023 And there’s hardly a deer hunter alive who doesn’t dream of taking a buck that eclipses that magic 200 number. Scott Bestul, Field & Stream, 9 Jan. 2023 Vega connects that magic to the trappings of digital culture, which has led to, among other things, El Salvador adopting Bitcoin as national currency, despite many of its citizens not owning smartphones. Dallas News, 14 Dec. 2022 Naturally, then, speculation about the film’s reshoots has led to rumors that a few Lokis might magic their way into Doctor Strange and Wanda’s orbit. Savannah Salazar, Vulture, 5 May 2022 Still, Richardson Jackson clearly knows how to direct actors and pulls magic out of her cast, creating a production worthy of August Wilson's legacy. Dave Quinn, EW.com, 14 Oct. 2022 Buckley had a vast tonal range from which to choose in his musical palette, from deep trauma to horror to otherworldly magic. Jazz Tangcay, Variety, 14 July 2022 The auction house, through glossy catalogs and (increasingly) online offerings, can magic up artistic legitimacy that once only museums or scholars could assign. New York Times, 23 May 2022 The book opens the door to magic and brings readers inside its world by revealing the artistry, inside history, and fascinating traditions of a subject long shrouded in mystery. cleveland, 18 Mar. 2022 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'magic.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Noun and Adjective

Middle English magique, from Middle French, from Latin magice, from Greek magikē, feminine of magikos Magian, magical, from magos magus, sorcerer, of Iranian origin; akin to Old Persian maguš sorcerer

First Known Use

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Adjective

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1906, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of magic was in the 14th century

Dictionary Entries Near magic

Cite this Entry

“Magic.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/magic. Accessed 22 Feb. 2024.

Kids Definition

magic

noun
mag·​ic
ˈmaj-ik
1
: the power to control natural forces that is possessed by certain persons (as wizards and witches) in folktales and fiction
2
a
: a power that seems mysterious
the magic of a great name
b
: something that charms
the magic of their singing
3
: the art or skill of performing tricks or illusions as if by magic for entertainment
magic adjective
magical
ˈmaj-i-kəl
adjective
magically
-i-k(ə-)lē
adverb
Etymology

Noun

Middle English magique "use of supernatural powers," from early French magique (same meaning), from Latin magice (same meaning), derived from Greek magikos "magical, relating to magi," from magos "Persian priest, sorcerer" — related to magi

More from Merriam-Webster on magic

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