lure

noun
\ ˈlu̇r How to pronounce lure (audio) \

Definition of lure

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : an object usually of leather or feathers attached to a long cord and used by a falconer to recall or exercise a hawk
2a : an inducement to pleasure or gain : enticement the lure of adventure the lure of her beauty
b : appeal, attraction may succumb to the lure of candy, sodas and other sweets— Cheryl Jennings-Sauer
3 : a decoy for attracting animals to capture: such as
a : artificial bait used for catching fish
b : an often luminous (see luminous sense 1a) structure on the head of pediculate fishes that is used to attract prey

lure

verb
lured; luring

Definition of lure (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to recall or exercise (a hawk) by means of a lure
2 : to draw with a hint of pleasure or gain : attract actively and strongly

Keep scrolling for more

Choose the Right Synonym for lure

Verb

lure, entice, inveigle, decoy, tempt, seduce mean to lead astray from one's true course. lure implies a drawing into danger, evil, or difficulty through attracting and deceiving. lured naive investors with get-rich-quick schemes entice suggests drawing by artful or adroit means. advertising designed to entice new customers inveigle implies enticing by cajoling or flattering. fund-raisers inveigling wealthy alumni decoy implies a luring into entrapment by artifice. attempting to decoy the enemy into an ambush tempt implies the presenting of an attraction so strong that it overcomes the restraints of conscience or better judgment. tempted by the offer of money seduce implies a leading astray by persuasion or false promises. seduced by assurances of assistance

Examples of lure in a Sentence

Noun the promise of easy money is always the lure for some people to take up a life of crime the fish simply didn't seem to like the lure I was using, so I didn't catch a thing Verb They lured the bear out of its den. The suburbs are luring middle-class families away from the city. The police lured him back to the scene of the crime. Explorers were lured to the area by tales of a city of gold. An attractive window display can help to lure shoppers into the store.
See More
Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Spanish mackerel are everywhere, easily caught on a small Clark Spoon or other chrome lure cranked or trolled fast. Frank Sargeant, al, 2 Apr. 2021 Even Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates was not immune to the lure of these games. Brett Molina, USA TODAY, 21 May 2021 Ever hasn’t struggled for kitchen staff, Muser said, because of the lure of working with chef Curtis Duffy. Josh Noel, chicagotribune.com, 13 May 2021 Their motivations are human; they can be seduced by the lure of money, infamy or admiration. David Robert Grimes, Scientific American, 26 Apr. 2021 Having access to the artists — who tend to be happy to talk to their wealthy new clients — is a lure. New York Times, 12 May 2021 American media grotesquely overplays NFL draft coverage, because speculation is the best lure for the sports fan, but drafting well is essential, and the local teams have done well of late. Star Tribune, 1 May 2021 Campus tours, Clark said, are one key lure, but the pandemic shut down in-person visits last spring and now. Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times, 19 Apr. 2021 Others question the need to use the horses as a lure. New York Times, 13 Apr. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Many large companies are taking note, trying to lure top talent with promises of untethering them from traditional workstations, Lister added. San Diego Union-Tribune, 13 June 2021 Expect others to join before too long -- countries which rely on tourism are trying to lure tourists back before their rivals. Julia Buckley, CNN, 9 June 2021 Maryland isn’t alone in trying to lure residents with the chance of big winnings. BostonGlobe.com, 21 May 2021 As Hollywood reopens, studios are trying to lure moviegoers back to theaters. Laura Newberry, Los Angeles Times, 21 May 2021 Mystic Lake Casino Hotel is trying to lure workers with signing bonuses of up to $1,000. Kavita Kumar, Star Tribune, 1 May 2021 Alberts said the organization is trying to lure the IIHF Women’s World Championship to North Texas after the event scheduled to be held in Halifax was cancelled this week. Matthew Defranks, Dallas News, 23 Apr. 2021 Instead, officials are trying to lure Russians onto social networks like VKontakte that are closely tied to the government. New York Times, 21 Feb. 2021 In that era, railroads spared no expense in trying to lure passengers aboard trains and even worked to develop attractions along their routes to entice the public to take a trip. Washington Post, 12 Feb. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'lure.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of lure

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for lure

Noun and Verb

Middle English, from Anglo-French lure, leure, of Germanic origin; akin to Middle High German luoder bait; perhaps akin to Old English lathian to invite, Old High German ladōn

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More About lure

Time Traveler for lure

Time Traveler

The first known use of lure was in the 14th century

See more words from the same century

Statistics for lure

Last Updated

17 Jun 2021

Cite this Entry

“Lure.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/lure. Accessed 18 Jun. 2021.

Style: MLA
MLACheck Mark Icon ChicagoCheck Mark Icon APACheck Mark Icon Merriam-WebsterCheck Mark Icon

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for lure

lure

noun

English Language Learners Definition of lure

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: an appealing or attractive quality
: a device used for attracting and catching animals, birds, or especially fish

lure

verb

English Language Learners Definition of lure (Entry 2 of 2)

: to cause or persuade (a person or an animal) to go somewhere or to do something by offering some pleasure or gain

lure

noun
\ ˈlu̇r How to pronounce lure (audio) \

Kids Definition of lure

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : something that attracts or tempts
2 : an artificial bait for catching fish

lure

verb
lured; luring

Kids Definition of lure (Entry 2 of 2)

: to tempt by offering pleasure or gain Men were lured by tales of treasure.

WORD OF THE DAY

Test Your Vocabulary

Name that Thing: Dog Breeds

True or False

Test your knowledge - and maybe learn something along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Universal Daily Crossword

A daily challenge for crossword fanatics.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!