temptation

noun

temp·​ta·​tion tem(p)-ˈtā-shən How to pronounce temptation (audio)
1
: the act of tempting or the state of being tempted especially to evil : enticement
2
: something tempting : a cause or occasion of enticement

Examples of temptation in a Sentence

Money is always a temptation. The dessert menu has a lot of delicious temptations. the temptations of the city
Recent Examples on the Web An intelligent spending plan requires control and emotional management to avoid temptation and impulse buying. Eugenia Last, The Mercury News, 18 Mar. 2024 Over the next 24 hours, Owen supposedly faced a series of tests and temptations involving dragons, demons and serpents. Lanta Davis and Vince Reighard, Smithsonian Magazine, 15 Mar. 2024 Muslims don’t just fast—they are encouraged to read the Quran, practice gratitude and compassion, avoid wrongdoings and temptations, and give to those in need. The Enquirer, 7 Mar. 2024 But she’s also caught up in her own disappointments and temptations, which warp the tale further. Deborah Treisman, The New Yorker, 4 Mar. 2024 Updatable firmware dangled an irresistible temptation for folks to start reverse engineering… Installing many of these mods is ridiculously easy. IEEE Spectrum, 27 Mar. 2024 The temptation to loll like a lotus-eater on the sands is profound. Tony Perrottet, Condé Nast Traveler, 22 Mar. 2024 Anyone who’s ever had a throbbing, swollen skin mound knows, the temptation to mess with it is strong. Sarah Klein, SELF, 15 Feb. 2024 No surprise the temptation to start silencing all forms of dissent. Eleanor Dearman, Fort Worth Star-Telegram, 15 Feb. 2024

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'temptation.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Middle English temptacioun "testing, enticement to sin," borrowed from Anglo-French tentacion, borrowed from Late Latin temptātiōn-, temptātiō "enticement to sin," going back to Latin, "attempt, attack," from temptāre "to feel, test, attempt, make an assault on, attack" + -tiōn-, -tiō, suffix of verbal action — more at tempt

First Known Use

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of temptation was in the 13th century

Dictionary Entries Near temptation

Cite this Entry

“Temptation.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/temptation. Accessed 17 Apr. 2024.

Kids Definition

temptation

noun
temp·​ta·​tion tem(p)-ˈtā-shən How to pronounce temptation (audio)
1
: the act of tempting : the state of being tempted especially to evil
2
: something tempting

More from Merriam-Webster on temptation

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