moor

1 of 3

noun (1)

1
chiefly British : an expanse of open rolling infertile land
2
: a boggy area
especially : one that is peaty and dominated by grasses and sedges

moor

2 of 3

verb

moored; mooring; moors

transitive verb

: to make fast with or as if with cables, lines, or anchors : anchor

intransitive verb

1
: to secure a boat by mooring : anchor
2
: to be made fast

Moor

3 of 3

noun (2)

1
: one of the Arab and Berber conquerors of Spain
2
: berber
Moorish adjective

Examples of moor in a Sentence

Noun (1) as she wanders the windswept moor, the novel's heroine vows that she will never marry the vicar a mysterious figure who was said to have haunted the moors of southwest England Verb We found a harbor and moored the boat there for the night. The boat was moored alongside the dock. We need to find a place to moor for the night.
Recent Examples on the Web
Noun
The Border Reivers thrived in this atmosphere, rustling cattle and other livestock across the Borders’ steep river valleys and rough open moors, and frequently fencing their goods farther south in England. Yannic Rack, Smithsonian Magazine, 2 July 2024 Tickets from $275 Northern England on The Yorkshire Dales Explorer Step aboard the new Yorkshire Dales Explorer train, and you’ll be treated to a meandering journey through Yorkshire Dales National Park in northern England, with its stunning views of rolling green hills and dramatic moors. Jessica Puckett, Condé Nast Traveler, 2 July 2024
Verb
It was moored off a marina in the Middle Keys city of Marathon from 2019 until the 39-year-old man moved back to his home state of Wisconsin four years later. David Goodhue, Miami Herald, 3 July 2024 The email says claimants will be permitted aboard the ship, which will be moored at the Seagirt Marine Terminal, starting May 20. Madeleine O'Neill, Baltimore Sun, 9 May 2024 See all Example Sentences for moor 

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'moor.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Noun (1)

Middle English mor, from Old English mōr; akin to Old High German muor moor

Verb

Middle English moren; akin to Middle Dutch meren, maren to tie, moor

Noun (2)

Middle English More, from Anglo-French, from Latin Maurus inhabitant of Mauretania

First Known Use

Noun (1)

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense

Noun (2)

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of moor was before the 12th century

Dictionary Entries Near moor

Cite this Entry

“Moor.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/moor. Accessed 18 Jul. 2024.

Kids Definition

moor

1 of 3 noun
: a boggy area
especially : one that is peaty and dominated by grasses and sedges

moor

2 of 3 verb
: to fasten in place with cables, lines, or anchors
moor a boat
moorage
-ij
noun

Moor

3 of 3 noun
: one of a North African people that conquered Spain in the 8th century and ruled until 1492
Moorish adjective
Etymology

Noun

Old English mōr "an area of open and wet wasteland"

Verb

Middle English moren "to fasten (a boat) in place"

Noun

Middle English More "Moor," from early French More (same meaning), from Latin Maurus "a person from Mauretania (a country in Africa)"

More from Merriam-Webster on moor

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