lure

1 of 2

noun

1
: an object usually of leather or feathers attached to a long cord and used by a falconer to recall or exercise a hawk
2
a
: an inducement to pleasure or gain : enticement
the lure of adventure
the lure of her beauty
b
: appeal, attraction
may succumb to the lure of candy, sodas and other sweets Cheryl Jennings-Sauer
3
: a decoy for attracting animals to capture: such as
a
: artificial bait used for catching fish
b
: an often luminous (see luminous sense 1a) structure on the head of pediculate fishes that is used to attract prey

lure

2 of 2

verb

lured; luring

transitive verb

1
: to recall or exercise (a hawk) by means of a lure
2
: to draw with a hint of pleasure or gain : attract actively and strongly
Choose the Right Synonym for lure

lure, entice, inveigle, decoy, tempt, seduce mean to lead astray from one's true course.

lure implies a drawing into danger, evil, or difficulty through attracting and deceiving.

lured naive investors with get-rich-quick schemes

entice suggests drawing by artful or adroit means.

advertising designed to entice new customers

inveigle implies enticing by cajoling or flattering.

fund-raisers inveigling wealthy alumni

decoy implies a luring into entrapment by artifice.

attempting to decoy the enemy into an ambush

tempt implies the presenting of an attraction so strong that it overcomes the restraints of conscience or better judgment.

tempted by the offer of money

seduce implies a leading astray by persuasion or false promises.

seduced by assurances of assistance

Example Sentences

Noun the promise of easy money is always the lure for some people to play the lottery the fish simply didn't seem to like the lure I was using, so I didn't catch a thing Verb They lured the bear out of its den. The suburbs are luring middle-class families away from the city. The police lured him back to the scene of the crime. Explorers were lured to the area by tales of a city of gold. An attractive window display can help to lure shoppers into the store. See More
Recent Examples on the Web
Noun
Both, however, said the environmental benefits were only part of the lure for people in the city. The Christian Science Monitor, 8 Sep. 2022 My turn was next, with a 21-inch northern on the same type of lure. Paul A. Smith, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, 7 May 2022 Most hits came in the first second or two after the lure hit the water. Paul A. Smith, Journal Sentinel, 21 Aug. 2022 Like time, the lure of the match has its advantages and disadvantages. Chris Carosa, Forbes, 1 Aug. 2022 However, the constant lure of the cellphone being turned on is too much to resist for students at this time. John Laidler, BostonGlobe.com, 28 July 2022 Drinking water or electrolyte-heavy fluids can replenish your tank, but despite the lure of a cold beer on a hot day, Sueker recommends staying away from alcoholic beverages. Zoe Christen Jones, CBS News, 23 July 2022 Other times, sneakers drop in value because a shoe company decides to restock the model, killing the lure of exclusivity. Inti Pacheco, WSJ, 4 Nov. 2022 Some of them struggle with hard rules and lofty expectations, as well as with the enduring damage of trauma, heartbreak, and the powerful lure of old habits. Steve Lopezcolumnist, Los Angeles Times, 2 Nov. 2022
Verb
When only a small number of Hansa's dealers took them up on the offer, the police tried adding more helpful information to it, designed to lure vendors, like buyer statistics that would let the sellers track and rank their best customers. Andy Greenberg, WIRED, 29 Nov. 2022 In Nashville, the public funding commitment can be larger because the region can bank on recouping the money by creating yet another attraction to lure even more visitors to Music City, including the potential of hosting a Super Bowl. Andrew Seligman, Fortune, 17 Nov. 2022 Today, the town’s waterfront estates lure quietly wealthy celebs and corporate kingpins, many of whom swoon over the area’s world-class surfing. David Kaufman, Robb Report, 9 Nov. 2022 Alternately, feeling bad about yourself might lure you toward an unwise decision out of desperation. Chicago Tribune, 31 Oct. 2022 Since the Scottish government puts a monetary value on carbon reductions, carbon credits lure private money to nature restoration projects. Riley Farrell, ABC News, 29 Oct. 2022 That will lure fresh spawning trout up the traditional steelhead streams and provide some great fishig. D'arcy Egan, cleveland, 27 Oct. 2022 Following shelter-in-place mandate lifts, there’s been a struggle to lure workers back in-office, and with good reason. Jasmine Browley, Essence, 10 Nov. 2022 Last month, city officials partnered with Airbnb in an effort to lure more remote workers from other countries to Mexico’s capital. Noah Goldberg, Los Angeles Times, 10 Nov. 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'lure.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

Word History

Etymology

Noun and Verb

Middle English, from Anglo-French lure, leure, of Germanic origin; akin to Middle High German luoder bait; perhaps akin to Old English lathian to invite, Old High German ladōn

First Known Use

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of lure was in the 14th century

Dictionary Entries Near lure

Cite this Entry

“Lure.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/lure. Accessed 5 Dec. 2022.

Kids Definition

lure 1 of 2

noun

1
a
: something that persuades one to perform an action for pleasure or gain : temptation
2
: a decoy for attracting animals to capture
especially : an artificial bait used for catching fish

lure

2 of 2

verb

lured; luring
: to tempt or lead away by offering some pleasure or advantage : entice

More from Merriam-Webster on lure

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