liberate

verb
lib·​er·​ate | \ ˈli-bə-ˌrāt How to pronounce liberate (audio) \
liberated; liberating

Definition of liberate

transitive verb

1 : to set at liberty : free specifically : to free (something, such as a country) from domination by a foreign power
2 : to free from combination liberate the gas by adding acid
3 : to take or take over illegally or unjustly material liberated from a nearby construction site— Thorne Dreyer

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Other Words from liberate

liberator \ ˈli-​bə-​ˌrā-​tər How to pronounce liberator (audio) \ noun
liberatory \ ˈli-​b(ə-​)rə-​ˌtȯr-​ē How to pronounce liberatory (audio) \ adjective

Choose the Right Synonym for liberate

free, release, liberate, emancipate, manumit mean to set loose from restraint or constraint. free implies a usually permanent removal from whatever binds, confines, entangles, or oppresses. freed the animals from their cages release suggests a setting loose from confinement, restraint, or a state of pressure or tension, often without implication of permanent liberation. released his anger on a punching bag liberate stresses particularly the resulting state of liberty. liberated their country from the tyrant emancipate implies the liberation of a person from subjection or domination. labor-saving devices emancipated us from household drudgery manumit implies emancipation from slavery. the document manumitted the slaves

Examples of liberate in a Sentence

Rebels fought to liberate the country. Soldiers liberated the hostages from their captors. Laptop computers could liberate workers from their desks. He was using materials that he had liberated from a construction site.
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Recent Examples on the Web

Diane Halfin was born on New Year’s Eve 1946 in Brussels, just 18 months after her mother Lily Nahmias was liberated from Auschwitz, weighing just 49 pounds. Alex Kuczynski, Town & Country, "Diane and Talita von Furstenberg Turn an American Empire into a Family Dynasty," 7 Feb. 2019 Naming these desires will liberate more of your life force to expend energy creating rather than concealing. Bess Matassa, Teen Vogue, "Weekly Horoscopes October 29-November 4," 28 Oct. 2018 Cristiano Ronaldo, Lionel Messi and Neymar have all gone home; Sweden, liberated from Zlatan Ibrahimovic’s ego, has prospered. Jonathan Wilson, SI.com, "The Danger of Overreacting to Brazil's Disappointing World Cup Exit," 7 July 2018 Luckily many of you tastemakers have liberated men from the status quo. Cam Wolf, GQ, "Supreme Just Won the Biggest Award in Menswear," 5 June 2018 But anti-patronage judicial rulings have liberated city workers from having to toil in the political fields. Ben Joravsky, Chicago Reader, "News / Politics With nine candidates for mayor now in the race, expect the hustle for signatures to be harder than ever," 10 May 2018 On the ground in Syria, armed forces liberated Eastern Ghouta after driving out the remaining armed groups from Douma, the Al Mayadeen television network reported, citing a statement by the Syrian Army. Andrew J Barden, Bloomberg.com, "Taking Stock of the U.S.-Led Missile Strikes on Syria: Q&A," 14 Apr. 2018 In 1945, during World War II, American soldiers liberated the Dachau camp. BostonGlobe.com, "This day in history," 28 Apr. 2018 The form seems to liberate her from concerns about divulging too much. Emily Bobrow, WSJ, "‘Where Reasons End’ Review: Her Son’s Afterlife," 1 Feb. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'liberate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of liberate

circa 1623, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for liberate

Latin liberatus, past participle of liberare, from liber — see liberal entry 1

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Statistics for liberate

Last Updated

17 Mar 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for liberate

The first known use of liberate was circa 1623

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More Definitions for liberate

liberate

verb

English Language Learners Definition of liberate

: to free (someone or something) from being controlled by another person, group, etc.
: to give freedom or more freedom to (someone)
humorous : to take or steal (something)

liberate

verb
lib·​er·​ate | \ ˈli-bə-ˌrāt How to pronounce liberate (audio) \
liberated; liberating

Kids Definition of liberate

: to set free

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More from Merriam-Webster on liberate

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with liberate

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for liberate

Spanish Central: Translation of liberate

Nglish: Translation of liberate for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of liberate for Arabic Speakers

Comments on liberate

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