intimidate

verb
in·tim·i·date | \ in-ˈti-mə-ˌdāt \
intimidated; intimidating

Definition of intimidate 

transitive verb

: to make timid or fearful : frighten especially : to compel or deter by or as if by threats tried to intimidate a witness

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Other words from intimidate

intimidation \in-ˌti-mə-ˈdā-shən \ noun
intimidator \in-ˈti-mə-ˌdā-tər \ noun

Choose the Right Synonym for intimidate

intimidate, cow, bulldoze, bully, browbeat mean to frighten into submission. intimidate implies inducing fear or a sense of inferiority into another. intimidated by so many other bright freshmen cow implies reduction to a state where the spirit is broken or all courage is lost. not at all cowed by the odds against making it in show business bulldoze implies an intimidating or an overcoming of resistance usually by urgings, demands, or threats. bulldozed the city council into approving the plan bully implies intimidation through threats, insults, or aggressive behavior. bullied into giving up their lunch money browbeat implies a cowing through arrogant, scornful, or contemptuous treatment. browbeat the witness into a contradiction

Examples of intimidate in a Sentence

He tries to intimidate his opponents. You shouldn't allow his reputation to intimidate you.

Recent Examples on the Web

If the fire seems even a smidge too big or intimidating to control, get out and call 911. Carolyn L. Todd, SELF, "Emergency Responders Share 9 of the Biggest Death Traps in Your Home," 14 July 2018 The commission said Delashaw had intimidated subordinates by yelling and swearing at them, creating a climate where staff members were reluctant to ask the type of questions needed to properly care for patients. Sandi Doughton, The Seattle Times, "Former Swedish surgeon Johnny Delashaw gets his license back, with restrictions," 10 July 2018 The tactics intimidated the Guatemalan government eager to avoid the expense of defending a GATT challenge. Eric Levitz, Daily Intelligencer, "It’s Normal for the U.S. to Put Corporate Profits Above Babies’ Health," 10 July 2018 Sharing stories has been something that’s intimidated Adams in the past. Trevor Fraser, OrlandoSentinel.com, "Musicians take the couch in Orlando's Person Cave," 6 July 2018 Class salutatorian Sierra Danyow said that coming to the school as a freshman from Canterbury was initially intimidating. Janice Steinhagen, Courant Community, "Ellis Tech Class Of 2018 Called 'Spirited, Challenging, Committed'," 26 June 2018 While some stores have stepped away from the campaign due to ex-police officers allegedly intimidating employees, Lush U.K. has stated that the campaign will go on as intended. Amanda Arnold, The Cut, "Everything to Know About the Lush Police Campaign Controversy," 6 June 2018 Fairs are a great opportunity to get exposure to all kinds of art, especially for neophytes who might otherwise find walking into a private gallery intimidating. Frederik Balfour, Bloomberg.com, "Top Collectors Reveal the Secrets of How to Invest in Art," 7 May 2018 Moving usually isn't cheap, and moving to a big city where the cost of living will trend higher can be intimidating. refinery29.com, "How Much It Costs To Live In The U.S. Cities With The Most Jobs," 3 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'intimidate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of intimidate

1646, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for intimidate

Medieval Latin intimidatus, past participle of intimidare, from Latin in- + timidus timid

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Statistics for intimidate

Last Updated

10 Sep 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for intimidate

The first known use of intimidate was in 1646

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More Definitions for intimidate

intimidate

verb

English Language Learners Definition of intimidate

: to make (someone) afraid

intimidate

verb
in·tim·i·date | \ in-ˈti-mə-ˌdāt \
intimidated; intimidating

Kids Definition of intimidate

: to frighten especially by threats

intimidate

transitive verb
in·tim·i·date | \ in-ˈti-mə-ˌdāt \
intimidated; intimidating

Legal Definition of intimidate 

1 : to make timid or fearful especially : to compel or deter by or as if by threats — see also coercion

2 : to engage in the crime of intimidating (as a witness, juror, public officer in the performance of his or her duty, or victim of a robbery or other crime)

Other words from intimidate

intimidatingly adverb
intimidation \in-ˌti-mə-ˈdā-shən \ noun
intimidator \in-ˈti-mə-ˌdā-tər \ noun

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