scare

verb
\ ˈsker How to pronounce scare (audio) \
scared; scaring

Definition of scare

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

: to frighten especially suddenly : alarm

scare

noun

Definition of scare (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a sudden fright
2 : a widespread state of alarm : panic

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Other Words from scare

Verb

scarer noun

Noun

scare adjective

Synonyms & Antonyms for scare

Synonyms: Verb

Synonyms: Noun

Antonyms: Verb

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Examples of scare in a Sentence

Verb You scared me. I didn't see you there. Stop that, you're scaring the children. Noun There have been scares about the water supply being contaminated. fired over their heads in order to throw a scare into them
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb My fear, as always, was that the noise would wake and scare them. Washington Post, "Raising kids in Gaza was hard enough. Then came a lockdown within the lockdown.," 12 Sep. 2020 The Chinese economy is still reliant on foreign investment and Beijing is wary of moves that could scare off multinationals and scuttle its phase-one trade deal with Trump. Jenny Leonard, Bloomberg.com, "Dollar Dominance Gives U.S. Upper Hand in China Sanctions Fight," 8 Sep. 2020 The Hybrid Fire is expensive, and the price will scare many folks away. Popular Mechanics Editors, Popular Mechanics, "Your Ultimate Grill Buying Guide—Tested and Approved," 8 Sep. 2020 Corporations are in no rush to return their employees to the city, and the heavy traumas of 2020 will scare off meaningful numbers of upwardly ascendant dreamers who might otherwise have relocated to New York for work or pleasure. Michael Toscano, National Review, "The 9/11 Tribute in Light Emphasizes Bill de Blasio’s Failure," 3 Sep. 2020 George Will, Max Boot, and Bret Stephens have all made the case that the situation in Portland will scare white voters into the arms of Donald Trump. Alex Shephard, The New Republic, "The Media Is Falling for Trump’s Law and Order Con," 1 Sep. 2020 But that won’t scare Rosas away from taking someone who plays a similar position to others on the team. Chris Hine, Star Tribune, "Wolves' No. 1 pick: No obvious choice but definite value," 21 Aug. 2020 And Kenosha has seen a jump in misinformation spread on social media — made in an effort to scare residents, Kenosha County Sheriff David Beth said Monday at a news conference. Jr Radcliffe, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Trump in Kenosha: Senator Ron Johnson credits Pres. Trump for peace on Kenosha streets," 1 Sep. 2020 Brimstone's goal this year was to be able to scare guests from a distance. Briana Rice, The Enquirer, "Will local haunted houses open this year? Yes and no.," 27 Aug. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The Giants, who endured two postponements over the weekend after a COVID scare, have now been sidelined by smoky air from fires in the Northwest. Henry Schulman, SFChronicle.com, "Giants flying home as smoke forces postponement of game in Seattle," 15 Sep. 2020 Even Texas Tech fans who were starved all offseason to watch football had to ask themselves if enduring a scare against Houston Baptist was really worth it. Dan Wolken, USA TODAY, "Opinion: After loss to Georgia Tech, Florida State and Mike Norvell sit atop the Misery Index," 13 Sep. 2020 The trailer opens with Miranda telling his son that, rather than slow down since his health scare, his life has actually gotten busier. Ruth Kinane, EW.com, "Lin-Manuel Miranda's dad is nonstop in Siempre, Luis trailer," 10 Sep. 2020 Mike James’ knee only was hyperextended but the scare motivated him. Shannon Russell, The Courier-Journal, "Meet Mike James, Louisville basketball's latest four-star commit," 9 Sep. 2020 Tesla Bulls got a huge scare yesterday when shares dipped by more than 20%. Bernhard Warner, Fortune, "Jittery investors eye today’s big jobs report as markets rebound from an epic sell-off," 4 Sep. 2020 So try not to freak out if a Covid-19 second wave causes a stock market drop, or if other negative headlines about the upcoming presidential election scare Wall Street in the next few months. Paul R. La Monica For Cnn Business Perspectives, CNN, "The market rebound since March shows why it doesn't pay to panic," 4 Sep. 2020 The Orioles’ big offensive inning came with a bit of a scare attached. Jon Meoli, baltimoresun.com, "John Means goes deep, but so do Mets in Orioles’ 9-4 loss," 2 Sep. 2020 Kansas will give Tom Herman’s side yet another scare, but the Longhorns will pull away late. Dallas News, "Game-by-game predictions for Texas in 2020: Are Longhorns Big 12 Championship Game-bound?," 2 Sep. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'scare.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of scare

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense

Noun

circa 1548, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for scare

Verb

Middle English skerren, from Old Norse skirra, from skjarr shy, timid

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Time Traveler for scare

Time Traveler

The first known use of scare was in the 13th century

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Statistics for scare

Last Updated

18 Sep 2020

Cite this Entry

“Scare.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/scare. Accessed 27 Sep. 2020.

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More Definitions for scare

scare

verb
How to pronounce scare (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of scare

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to cause (someone) to become afraid
: to become afraid

scare

noun

English Language Learners Definition of scare (Entry 2 of 2)

: a sudden feeling of fear
: a situation in which a lot of people become afraid because of some threat, danger, etc.

scare

verb
\ ˈsker How to pronounce scare (audio) \
scared; scaring

Kids Definition of scare

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to become or cause to become frightened Your stories scare the children.
scare up
: to find or get with some difficulty She scared up something for us to eat.

scare

noun

Kids Definition of scare (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a sudden feeling of fear : fright
2 : a widespread state of alarm There was a scare that the disease would spread.

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Comments on scare

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