scare

verb
\ ˈsker How to pronounce scare (audio) \
scared; scaring

Definition of scare

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

: to frighten especially suddenly : alarm

scare

noun

Definition of scare (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a sudden fright
2 : a widespread state of alarm : panic

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Other Words from scare

Verb

scarer noun

Noun

scare adjective

Synonyms & Antonyms for scare

Synonyms: Verb

Synonyms: Noun

Antonyms: Verb

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Examples of scare in a Sentence

Verb You scared me. I didn't see you there. Stop that, you're scaring the children. Noun There have been scares about the water supply being contaminated. fired over their heads in order to throw a scare into them
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Drivers’ groups call the threats scare tactics, designed to frighten people into voting for the ballot measure. Aarian Marshall, Wired, "The Fate of Gig Workers Is in the Hands of California Voters," 20 Oct. 2020 But scientists in Australia have used them for the opposite purpose: to scare away unwanted onlookers. Max G. Levy, Science | AAAS, "Wacky tube men could keep dingoes away from livestock in Australia," 20 Oct. 2020 The Mountain Lion Foundation and others tell hikers to carry personal alarms or air horns to scare animals. Tribune News Service, oregonlive, "That mountain lion was just bluffing that trail runner, not attacking, experts say," 18 Oct. 2020 But whereas those were set up simply to scare, the ghosts of Bly Manor are all deeply connected to the greater mystery at the heart of the series. Rosie Knight, refinery29.com, "What’s Really Going On With The Ghosts Of Bly Manor," 10 Oct. 2020 The exalted season of haunting is upon us, and soon, children will pull on costumes and trek through neighborhoods trick-or-treating after dark as candlelit jack-o-lanterns scare away demons (or so the legend goes). Terry Demio, The Enquirer, "Will pandemic hamper Halloween fun? We asked COVID-19 experts, 'Would you do this, doc?'," 28 Sep. 2020 Along with the message, the 15-time Grammy winner also posted a hilarious video of Richie lying on the kitchen floor before leaping up to scare Adele from out of nowhere. Marika Gerken, CNN, "Adele shows off her silly side in birthday post for Nicole Richie," 27 Sep. 2020 Thankfully, the virus is not going to scare away trick-or-treating as it’s on schedule in all three cities in our coverage area. cleveland, "COVID-19 is not going to scare away Halloween events: Short Takes on Avon, Avon Lake and North Ridgeville," 19 Sep. 2020 Avoiding skin flare-ups is essential, though that shouldn't scare you away from using exfoliants (which get a bad rap for causing redness and burning) completely. Tiffany Dodson, SELF, "The 16 Best Face Exfoliators for Sensitive Skin, According to Dermatologists," 16 Sep. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Alabama won a college football game – as usual – Saturday night with their coach Nick Saban stalking the sideline after a COVID-19 scare. Joel Shannon, USA TODAY, "Coronavirus updates: Patriots will play Broncos; Saban, Alabama get their game in; Trump urges beleaguered Wisconsin to open up," 18 Oct. 2020 The Indianapolis Colts became the latest NFL team receiving a COVID-19 scare within their organization Friday morning. Chris Sims, The Indianapolis Star, "Here are NFL COVID-19 schedule changes, teams with positive tests," 16 Oct. 2020 The Browns had a COVID-19 scare in Aug. 23 when double-digit members of the organization tested positive, then were retested and the tests came back negative. cleveland, "Odell Beckham Jr. and all other Browns test negative for COVID-19; Facility open and Steelers game on," 16 Oct. 2020 Sanders posted a season-high 93 yards on six receptions and Smith, after an injury scare, had 54 yards on four catches, with two of those snags resulting in touchdowns. Amie Just | Staff Writer, NOLA.com, "5 touchdown day makes Saints' offense akin to 'poetry' in win over Lions," 4 Oct. 2020 The White House got its first COVID-19 scare in early March when at least three people who later tested positive came in close proximity to the president at his private Florida club. David Aaro, Fox News, "Trump joins list of world leaders that have tested positive for coronavirus," 2 Oct. 2020 The White House got its first COVID-19 scare in early March when at least three people who later tested positive came in close proximity to the president at his private Florida club. sun-sentinel.com, "President Donald Trump, first lady test positive for COVID-19," 2 Oct. 2020 While the Islanders went 12 minutes without a shot on goal from late in the first period until midway through the second, the Lightning got an injury scare later in the period. Stephen Whyno, orlandosentinel.com, "Tampa Bay Lightning beat New York Islanders in OT, reach Stanley Cup Final," 18 Sep. 2020 Baseball got a big scare this week when the Marlins had several players test positive for the coronavirus and MLB had to postpone their games through Sunday. Star Tribune, "Vikings' home-field advantage might shrink because of coronavirus," 31 July 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'scare.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of scare

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense

Noun

circa 1548, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for scare

Verb

Middle English skerren, from Old Norse skirra, from skjarr shy, timid

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Time Traveler for scare

Time Traveler

The first known use of scare was in the 13th century

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Statistics for scare

Last Updated

24 Oct 2020

Cite this Entry

“Scare.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/scare. Accessed 30 Oct. 2020.

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More Definitions for scare

scare

verb
How to pronounce scare (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of scare

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to cause (someone) to become afraid
: to become afraid

scare

noun

English Language Learners Definition of scare (Entry 2 of 2)

: a sudden feeling of fear
: a situation in which a lot of people become afraid because of some threat, danger, etc.

scare

verb
\ ˈsker How to pronounce scare (audio) \
scared; scaring

Kids Definition of scare

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to become or cause to become frightened Your stories scare the children.
scare up
: to find or get with some difficulty She scared up something for us to eat.

scare

noun

Kids Definition of scare (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a sudden feeling of fear : fright
2 : a widespread state of alarm There was a scare that the disease would spread.

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Comments on scare

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