scare

verb
\ ˈsker How to pronounce scare (audio) \
scared; scaring

Definition of scare

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

: to frighten especially suddenly : alarm

scare

noun

Definition of scare (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a sudden fright
2 : a widespread state of alarm : panic

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Other Words from scare

Verb

scarer noun

Noun

scare adjective

Synonyms & Antonyms for scare

Synonyms: Verb

Synonyms: Noun

Antonyms: Verb

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Examples of scare in a Sentence

Verb You scared me. I didn't see you there. Stop that, you're scaring the children. Noun There have been scares about the water supply being contaminated. fired over their heads in order to throw a scare into them
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb When that didn’t scare them away, officials with the city of Manhattan Beach condemned the neighborhood and seized the land in 1924. Los Angeles Times, 30 Sep. 2021 Prison terms invented for them shouldn't scare us — Maxim and Maria wouldn't want that. Yuras Karmanau, ajc, 6 Sep. 2021 The Pixel 6 Pro price shouldn’t scare you Even if Pixel 6 registration is possible, Google has not revealed the Pixel 6 price. Chris Smith, BGR, 3 Aug. 2021 The star of HBO Max's shiny new reimagining of the mid-aughts classic is only 19 years old, but Hollywood doesn't scare her. Christopher Rosa, Glamour, 13 July 2021 To that end, David Donald, a corporate law professor at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, said that the Apple Daily crackdown won't scare financial services companies. Eamon Barrett, Fortune, 30 June 2021 The thread was filled with comments from people accusing the department of purposefully trying to scare parents. Courtney Tanner, The Salt Lake Tribune, 6 Oct. 2021 So this happens at night, and the people will come running, trying to scare the animals away. Washington Post, 24 Sep. 2021 The committee, and Manchin, and indeed many others in the anti-deficit camp try to scare the public through subterfuge. Michael Hiltzik, Los Angeles Times, 3 Sep. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun In 2001, the nation’s anthrax scare hit the White House with the discovery of a small concentration of spores at an offsite mail processing center. BostonGlobe.com, 23 Oct. 2021 What to expect: This sprawling theme park offers multiple scare experiences including the Haunted Trail, the Historical Mystery Mansion, Dr. Psycho's Haunted Estate, Big Mana's Revenge, Killer Klowns 3D Maze, Temple of Terror and Phobia. Luann Gibbs, The Enquirer, 22 Oct. 2021 This cancer scare and diagnosis put my mind and body in a state of overdrive. Katherine Han, Health.com, 22 Oct. 2021 Halloween is upon is — as are various SoCal scare experiences. Los Angeles Times, 16 Oct. 2021 An intense health scare finally put Dash back on track to sobriety. Essence, 15 Oct. 2021 The scene will be set via scare actors who will be sent from the morgue to deliver beer to thirsty Seattle residents — or, rather, haunt their doorsteps — delivering Elysian’s Pumpkin Variety Pack. Aly Walansky, Forbes, 14 Oct. 2021 Fright Fest has been steadily expanding its options over the years and now includes themed rides and live shows along with the haunts and scare zones. Doug George, chicagotribune.com, 14 Oct. 2021 The odd clumsy stab at a jump scare aside, Carolyn doesn’t demonstrate much affinity for, or interest in, building tension. Dennis Harvey, Variety, 6 Oct. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'scare.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of scare

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense

Noun

circa 1548, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for scare

Verb

Middle English skerren, from Old Norse skirra, from skjarr shy, timid

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Time Traveler for scare

Time Traveler

The first known use of scare was in the 13th century

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Dictionary Entries Near scare

scarcity economics

scare

scare away/off

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Statistics for scare

Last Updated

25 Oct 2021

Cite this Entry

“Scare.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/scare. Accessed 28 Oct. 2021.

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More Definitions for scare

scare

verb

English Language Learners Definition of scare

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to cause (someone) to become afraid : frighten
: to become afraid

scare

noun

English Language Learners Definition of scare (Entry 2 of 2)

: a sudden feeling of fear
: a situation in which a lot of people become afraid because of some threat, danger, etc.

scare

verb
\ ˈsker How to pronounce scare (audio) \
scared; scaring

Kids Definition of scare

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to become or cause to become frightened Your stories scare the children.
scare up
: to find or get with some difficulty She scared up something for us to eat.

scare

noun

Kids Definition of scare (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a sudden feeling of fear : fright
2 : a widespread state of alarm There was a scare that the disease would spread.

More from Merriam-Webster on scare

Nglish: Translation of scare for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of scare for Arabic Speakers

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