\ ˈber How to pronounce bare (audio) \
barer; barest

Definition of bare

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1a : lacking a natural, usual, or appropriate covering
b(1) : lacking clothing bare feet
(2) obsolete : bareheaded
c : lacking any tool or weapon opened the box with his bare hands
2 : open to view : exposed laying bare their secrets
3a : unfurnished or scantily supplied a bare room
b : destitute bare of all safeguards
4a : having nothing left over or added the bare necessities of life
b : mere a bare two hours away
c : devoid of amplification or adornment the bare facts
5 obsolete : worthless

bare

verb
\ ˈber How to pronounce bare (audio) \
bared; baring

Definition of bare (Entry 2 of 3)

transitive verb

: to make or lay (something) bare (see bare entry 1) : uncover

bare

Definition of bare (Entry 3 of 3)

archaic past of bear

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Other Words from bare

Adjective

bareness noun

Synonyms & Antonyms for bare

Synonyms: Adjective

Synonyms: Verb

Antonyms: Verb

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Choose the Right Synonym for bare

Adjective

bare, naked, nude, bald, barren mean deprived of naturally or conventionally appropriate covering. bare implies the removal of what is additional, superfluous, ornamental, or dispensable. an apartment with bare walls naked suggests absence of protective or ornamental covering but may imply a state of nature, of destitution, or of defenselessness. poor half-naked children nude applies especially to the unclothed human figure. a nude model posing for art students bald implies actual or seeming absence of natural covering and may suggest a conspicuous bareness. a bald mountain peak barren often suggests aridity or impoverishment or sterility. barren plains

Usage Note on Bear

Verb

There is considerable confusion between the verbs bear and bare. It may help to remember that the verb bare has only one meaning: "to uncover," as in "bare your shoulders" and "a dog baring its teeth." All other uses of the verb are for bear: "bearing children," "the right to bear arms," "bearing up under the stress/weight," "can't bear the thought," "bear south," "it bears repeating."

There is occasional confusion between bear and bare in adjectival uses (as in "he rubbed his bear arms"), but bear is properly a noun and only used like an adjective in the financial phrase bear market. All other uses refer to the state of being uncovered or naked and should therefore be bare: "bare necessities," "bare essentials," "bare arms," "bare bones," "bare-knuckle," and so on.

Usage Note on Bear

Adjective

There is considerable confusion between the verbs bear and bare. It may help to remember that the verb bare has only one meaning: "to uncover," as in "bare your shoulders" and "a dog baring its teeth." All other uses of the verb are for bear: "bearing children," "the right to bear arms," "bearing up under the stress/weight," "can't bear the thought," "bear south," "it bears repeating."

There is occasional confusion between bear and bare in adjectival uses (as in "he rubbed his bear arms"), but bear is properly a noun and only used like an adjective in the financial phrase bear market. All other uses refer to the state of being uncovered or naked and should therefore be bare: "bare necessities," "bare essentials," "bare arms," "bare bones," "bare-knuckle," and so on.

Examples of bare in a Sentence

Adjective The brittle-looking branches of bare trees reached up from the horizon, and smoke could be seen curling from the chimneys of the sturdy stone houses in the villages we passed through. — David McAninch, Saveur, November 2008 The dining room is warm and comfortable in a quasi-Tuscan-villa style, with bare wood floors, mottled walls,  … and a glass room divider etched with images of grapes. — Colman Andrews, Gourmet, March 2007 A scant two hours after his Derby victory, Monarchos was back in his … stall, beneath a bare bulb, eating carrots from a red bucket. — Steve Rushin, Sports Illustrated, 14 May 2001 There was a rug in the front room of the house, but the other floors were bare. Do not let the bare wires touch. He covered her bare arms with his coat. He had a glove on his left hand, but his right hand was bare. The ground was bare where the statue had stood for years. There was only one bare shelf. Her office was pretty bare, having only one desk and one chair. This is the barest room in the house. He only told me the bare facts about what happened. Verb Ed McMahon calls upon the canine coach to help him settle down his aggressive … terrier, which is nice to Ed but bares its teeth at guests. TV Guide, 29 Oct.-4 Nov. 2007 You could argue that the very act of conducting a lengthy poll by telephone skews the response pool. What sort of person bares her soul to pollsters for upward of an hour—and during the holiday season yet? — Katha Pollitt, Nation, 4/11 Aug. 2003 When Eastman called Death in the Afternoon (Hemingway's nonfiction book about bullfighting) "a literary style of wearing false hair on the chest," Hemingway had no other options than to bare his hirsute midsection and duke it out with his rival author in front of their editor, Max Perkins. The common mythology is that Hemingway beat Eastman to a bloody pulp, but Perkins' account had Eastman gaining the upper hand. — Will Manley, Booklist, 1 Apr. 2001 The better analogy is to bare all on the talk shows in which ordinary people are encouraged to reveal intimate aspects of their private lives. — Richard A. Posner, New Republic, 21 Aug. 2000 He bared his chest to show the scar. finally bared the secret that she had kept to herself for so long
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective McCormick’s recent endorsements of Democrats laid bare her split from Holcomb and GOP legislative leaders since she was elected to be state schools superintendent in 2016 with Republican Party support. Casey Smith, chicagotribune.com, "Indiana governor challengers name education department picks," 22 Oct. 2020 The fighting has also laid bare the challenges facing the Afghan security forces in maintaining security as the U.S. withdraws. Sune Engel Rasmussen And Ehsanullah Amiri, WSJ, "Afghan Airstrike Targeting Taliban Kills 12 Children as Peace Talks Stall," 22 Oct. 2020 For many, the coronavirus pandemic has laid bare the health disparities that exist along lines of class, age and race. John-john Williams Iv, baltimoresun.com, "The Baltimore Sun’s Women to Watch 2020: Best in health," 19 Oct. 2020 As in communities across the United States, the pandemic has laid those inequities bare and made the future all the more tenuous. Emma Nelson, Star Tribune, "As winter approaches, Payne Avenue business owners are determined to hold on," 17 Oct. 2020 The coronavirus pandemic and climate horrors have laid bare the pervasive and deep failings of the American welfare state. Ryan D. Doerfler, The New Republic, "Making the Supreme Court Safe for Democracy," 13 Oct. 2020 The July shooting, which led to nationwide protests and a deadly standoff between police and a gunman two weeks later that left three officers dead, roiled the city and laid bare the racial strife that has defined many aspects of its history. Matt Vasilogambros, USA TODAY, "How catastrophic floods are making it harder for Black communities to vote," 25 Sep. 2020 Zoom has laid bare the limitations of one person talking while others listen. Jonathan Becker, Fortune, "Can the corporate ‘offsite’ survive COVID?," 24 Sep. 2020 The pandemic has laid bare not just the vulnerability of housekeepers to economic shocks but their total lack of leverage. David Segal, New York Times, "Housekeepers Face a Disaster Generations in the Making," 18 Sep. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb All of this has laid to bare the immense risk and challenges of creating a live service game, a subgenre of online multiplayer games that have seldom released without headline-grabbing disasters. Washington Post, "‘Avengers’ updates showcases the best of the studio, and the worst of the game," 19 Oct. 2020 They bare fangs one at-bat at a time, forcing opponents to peek nervously over vulnerable shoulders. Bryce Miller Columnist, San Diego Union-Tribune, "Column: Padres bash, bash, bash some more in wild comeback against Cardinals," 1 Oct. 2020 While Gigi, 25, cradled her baby bump over a white dress for the outdoor sunset snap, Bella pulled up her hot pink tank top to bare her post-meal tummy. Jen Juneau, PEOPLE.com, "Bella Hadid Jokingly Compares Her 'Burger' Belly to Pregnant Sister Gigi Hadid's Baby Bump," 15 Sep. 2020 Five people bare their souls — and their political passions — via Zoom in this new comedy directed by Jay Roach. Chris Foran, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Fall movie preview, pandemic edition: Wonder Woman vs. the 1980s, James Bond vs. Freddie Mercury, and more," 10 Sep. 2020 My concern is that ‘disorder’ – by definition signalling abnormality – may make some women feel more out of control; that a monster within is always waiting to bare its teeth. Eleanor Morgan, refinery29.com, "What Causes PMDD? Yeah, They Don’t Know," 10 Sep. 2020 Women will soon be allowed to bare more flesh in Chicago establishments that sell liquor, in a move aldermen approved Wednesday to settle a federal lawsuit by a transgender woman. John Byrne, chicagotribune.com, "Aldermen approve measure that will allow more nudity in Chicago bars," 9 Sep. 2020 Women would soon be allowed to bare more flesh in Chicago establishments that sell liquor, in a move aldermen advanced Tuesday to settle a federal lawsuit by a transgender woman. John Byrne, chicagotribune.com, "City Council plan advances to allow women to bare more flesh in Chicago establishments," 25 Aug. 2020 But trying to unpack what exactly unfolded at Barnwell lays bare the confusing and often conflicting available information about COVID-19’s deadly path through the state’s elderly population. Joe Sexton, ProPublica, "Local Officials Say a Nursing Home Dumped Residents to Die at Hospitals," 11 Aug. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'bare.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of bare

Adjective

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for bare

Adjective and Verb

Middle English, from Old English bær; akin to Old High German bar naked, Lithuanian basas barefoot

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Time Traveler for bare

Time Traveler

The first known use of bare was before the 12th century

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Statistics for bare

Last Updated

26 Oct 2020

Cite this Entry

“Bare.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/bare. Accessed 30 Oct. 2020.

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More Definitions for bare

How to pronounce bare (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of bare

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: not having a covering
: not covered by clothing, shoes, a hat, etc.
: not covered by leaves, grass, trees, or plants

bare

verb
How to pronounce bare (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of bare (Entry 2 of 2)

: to remove the covering from (something)
\ ˈber How to pronounce bare (audio) \
barer; barest

Kids Definition of bare

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : having no covering : naked bare feet The trees were bare of leaves.
2 : empty entry 1 sense 1 The cupboard was bare.
3 : having nothing left over or added : mere the bare necessities … Thorton was abreast of him and a bare half-dozen strokes away …— Jack London, The Call of the Wild
4 : bald sense 2 the bare facts

bare

verb
bared; baring

Kids Definition of bare (Entry 2 of 2)

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Comments on bare

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