blare

verb
\ ˈbler How to pronounce blare (audio) \
blared; blaring

Definition of blare

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to sound loud and strident radios blaring

transitive verb

1 : to sound or utter raucously sat blaring the car horn
2 : to proclaim flamboyantly headlines blared his defeat

blare

noun

Definition of blare (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a loud strident noise
2 : dazzling often garish brilliance

Examples of blare in a Sentence

Verb Rock music blared through the store from the loudspeakers. Loudspeakers blared rock music through the store. Noun the blare of electric guitars the blare of horns arising from the long line of cars behind him did nothing to help the motorist get his car started again
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Cristo Rey is a simple church, sitting off a busy street behind a Family Dollar store, alongside railroad tracks transporting trains that blare their horns during Mass. New York Times, 25 Oct. 2021 This can be handy to blare out a horn when an emergency occurs, such as during an earthquake or a tsunami. Lance Eliot, Forbes, 20 Sep. 2021 Horns blare ominously as a soldier in an alien-looking space suit and flowing robes trudges through the twilight desert, lasgun in hand. Erik Kain, Forbes, 23 Oct. 2021 Up until the Taliban takeover on Aug. 15, Kabul restaurants used to blare out Afghan and foreign hits to attract customers. Zamir Saar, WSJ, 7 Oct. 2021 Audio from videos posted to social media appeared to blare out a loud noise, similar to a jet engine. Fox News, 21 Sep. 2021 Loud speakers blare instructions for people to go inside and shut windows, which Giovana and Yago, who’ve spent a night together, obey. John Hopewell, Variety, 9 Sep. 2021 The slickly programmed modern drums nod to the latest afro-house, but the guitar and horns blare with the force of tradition. Elias Leight, Rolling Stone, 7 Sep. 2021 The Emergency Outdoor Warning Siren System will blare during a tornado warning and most cellphones should automatically receive weather alerts, according to IEMA. Maggie Prosser, chicagotribune.com, 21 June 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun On a nearby street, sirens wail, a jackhammer ricochets, horns blare and birds chatter. Jessica Gelt, Los Angeles Times, 19 Nov. 2021 These visual depictions of sound look like sonar images from the ocean floor, with multicolored peaks and valleys depicting a syncopated go-go beat, the blare of a siren and the whoosh of a Metrobus’s brakes. Washington Post, 20 July 2021 There is the backbeat of cars whizzing down the busy street outside, the blare of J-rock over the speaker, and the constant whirring of several industrial fans. Nina Li Coomes, The Atlantic, 31 Oct. 2021 Then, with the blare of an air horn, the section was off in a mass of multi-colored T-shirts, tank tops and costumes. Jesse Leavenworth, courant.com, 9 Oct. 2021 In my rural corner of the county, the blare of the local firehouse siren serves as a daily reminder that life in this woodland paradise is also life inside an unfolding climate disaster. Manjula Martin, The New Yorker, 30 Sep. 2021 The plaza is a refreshing break from the blare of city life, and it's meant to be enjoyed at a leisurely pace. Alex Schechter, Travel + Leisure, 26 July 2021 Below them, by the water, paramedics gather on the dock, and sirens blare. Olivia Truffaut-wong, refinery29.com, 22 June 2021 Millions more Israelis have been forced to take shelter as nighttime sirens blare warnings of incoming fire. Washington Post, 18 May 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'blare.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of blare

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

Noun

1796, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for blare

Verb

Middle English bleren; akin to Middle Dutch blēren to shout

Learn More About blare

Time Traveler for blare

Time Traveler

The first known use of blare was in the 15th century

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Dictionary Entries Near blare

Blantyre

blare

blarina

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Statistics for blare

Last Updated

29 Nov 2021

Cite this Entry

“Blare.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/blare. Accessed 2 Dec. 2021.

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More Definitions for blare

blare

verb

English Language Learners Definition of blare

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to make a loud and usually unpleasant sound

blare

noun

English Language Learners Definition of blare (Entry 2 of 2)

: a loud and usually unpleasant noise

blare

verb
\ ˈbler How to pronounce blare (audio) \
blared; blaring

Kids Definition of blare

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to sound loud and harsh I heard the sirens blare.
2 : to present in a harsh noisy manner Loudspeakers blared advertisements.

blare

noun

Kids Definition of blare (Entry 2 of 2)

: a harsh loud noise

More from Merriam-Webster on blare

Nglish: Translation of blare for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of blare for Arabic Speakers

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