roar

verb
\ ˈrȯr How to pronounce roar (audio) \
roared; roaring; roars

Definition of roar

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1a : to utter or emit a full loud prolonged sound
b : to sing or shout with full force
2a : to make or emit a loud confused sound (such as background reverberation or rumbling)
b : to laugh loudly
3a : to be boisterous or disorderly
b : to proceed or rush with great noise or commotion
4 : to make a loud noise during inhalation (such as that of a horse affected with roaring)

transitive verb

1 : to utter or proclaim with a roar
2 : to cause to roar

roar

noun

Definition of roar (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : the deep cry of a wild animal (such as a lion)
2 : a loud deep cry (as of pain or anger)
3 : a loud continuous confused sound the roar of the crowd
4 : a boisterous outcry

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Examples of roar in a Sentence

Verb We heard a lion roar in the distance. The joke got the crowd roaring. The crowd roared its approval. She roared at him for being late. Noun the roar of the airplane engines the roar of the river
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Trump is heard telling the guests, who roar with laughter. Anchorage Daily News, "In recording Trump asks how long Ukraine can resist Russians, calls for removal of U.S. ambassador," 26 Jan. 2020 New Wave rocker Ric Ocasek was inducted as lead vocalist for The Cars, who roared out of Boston in the late 1970s. BostonGlobe.com, "You're using a browser set to private or incognito mode.," 31 Dec. 2019 For audiences inside 3M Arena at Mariucci, there was plenty for those in attendance to roar about during the opening home series of the season for the University of Minnesota men’s hockey team. Jess Myers, Twin Cities, "Men’s hockey: Gophers sweep away Niagara," 20 Oct. 2019 Their introductions brought roars from the students. Roy Parry, orlandosentinel.com, "Magic team with OCPS to reward students for reading," 16 Oct. 2019 Despite having missed the cut in his last four Opens, Lowry seemed impervious to the periods of lashing rain, fierce gusts and expectation, both from within and from the feverish fans, who roared him onto and off every green and tee. Rob Hodgetts, CNN, "Shane Lowry clinches Claret Jug for first major title," 21 July 2019 In Round 3 Alvey comes roaring back, stunned Spann with a hard shot and nearly got him with a standup choke hold against the cage. oregonlive, "UFC 249 video highlights: Justin Gaethjae dismantles Tony Ferguson, Henry Cejudo keeps title belt with Dominick Cruz knockout," 10 May 2020 In taking an approach that Holcomb described as methodical, the state will be in a position to begin helping Hoosiers' pocketbooks but still retain flexibility to hit pause if the coronavirus comes roaring back. Ryan Martin, Indianapolis Star, "'A little bit of science' and 'a little bit of art': Holcomb gives plan to reopen Indiana," 1 May 2020 After iPhone sales had come roaring back to life at the end of 2019, analysts expect the company’s overall revenue to drop about 6% from last year’s first quarter to $54.6 billion, on average. Aaron Pressman, Fortune, "4 key things to watch for in Apple’s earnings on Thursday," 30 Apr. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Some in the group approached the front of the elephant seal to get a classic shot of the big bull rising up and letting loose with its trademark clucking-type roar. Tom Stienstra, SFChronicle.com, "Point Reyes incident sets off wildlife ethics challenge," 5 Jan. 2020 Most days, the roar of freight trains that run parallel to Interstate 40 are the only sounds through downtown. Los Angeles Times, "‘We’re vulnerable’: On the Navajo Nation, a rush to curb the coronavirus," 6 May 2020 Instead, whispers of the secret tax windfalls were drowned out by the roar of justified pandemic panic. Ephrat Livni, Quartz, "Supreme Court case on Trump’s taxes may show if he benefits from CARES Act," 17 Apr. 2020 On one side is the deafening roar of social media. Twitter booms with self-justifying echoes. Laurence Scott, Wired, "ASMR and the Soothing Power of Experts," 21 Jan. 2020 Crozier was met with a roar of cheers from his sailors earlier this month as he was escorted off the aircraft carrier after the 5,000-person crew docked in Guam for testing. Anthony Leonardi, Washington Examiner, "Sailor on USS Theodore Roosevelt dies from coronavirus-related complications," 13 Apr. 2020 The five-speed shifter has long throws, the clutch is heavy, and the engine revs with a burly roar. Arthur St. Antoine, Car and Driver, "Tested: 1993 Land Rover Defender 110 Heads North," 24 Mar. 2020 Hundreds of people stood for about 35 minutes in cold, drizzling rain until a firefighter clambered up a ladder and finally pulled the covering off, to a roar from the crowd. Washington Post, "Richmond gets a new soaring statue, this one with dreadlocks," 11 Dec. 2019 And all of a sudden, the ringing of Carpenter’s car dulls to low roar. Nathan Brown, Indianapolis Star, "Ed Carpenter's unique vision created an IndyCar veteran. Now, he's driven by one thing: a 500 win," 28 Oct. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'roar.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of roar

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1a

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for roar

Verb

Middle English roren, from Old English rārian; akin to Old High German rērēn to bleat

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Time Traveler for roar

Time Traveler

The first known use of roar was before the 12th century

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Statistics for roar

Last Updated

29 May 2020

Cite this Entry

“Roar.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/roar. Accessed 3 Jun. 2020.

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More Definitions for roar

roar

verb
How to pronounce roar (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of roar

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to make the loud sound of a wild animal (such as a lion)
: to make a long, loud sound
: to laugh loudly

roar

noun

English Language Learners Definition of roar (Entry 2 of 2)

: the loud sound of a wild animal (such as a lion)
: a loud, low sound that continues for a long time

roar

verb
\ ˈrȯr How to pronounce roar (audio) \
roared; roaring

Kids Definition of roar

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to make a long loud sound The engine roared.
2 : to laugh loudly
3 : to say loudly “Bread is never free, boy,” he roared.— Avi, Crispin
4 : to move with a loud noise … all jumped into the sheriff's car and roared away …— Robert McCloskey, Homer Price

roar

noun

Kids Definition of roar (Entry 2 of 2)

: a long shout, bellow, or loud noise

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More from Merriam-Webster on roar

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for roar

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with roar

Spanish Central: Translation of roar

Nglish: Translation of roar for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of roar for Arabic Speakers

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