rattle

verb (1)
rat·​tle | \ ˈra-tᵊl How to pronounce rattle (audio) \
rattled; rattling\ ˈrat-​liŋ How to pronounce rattle (audio) , ˈra-​tᵊl-​iŋ \

Definition of rattle

 (Entry 1 of 3)

intransitive verb

1 : to make a rapid succession of short sharp noises the windows rattled in the wind
2 : to chatter incessantly and aimlessly
3 : to move with a clatter or rattle also : to be or move about in a place or station too large or grand rattled around the big old house

transitive verb

1 : to say, perform, or affect in a brisk lively fashion rattled off four magnificent backhands— Kim Chapin
2 : to cause to make a rattling sound
3 : rouse specifically : to beat (a cover) for game
4 : to upset especially to the point of loss of poise and composure : disturb

rattle

noun

Definition of rattle (Entry 2 of 3)

1a : a device that produces a rattle specifically : a case containing pellets used as a baby's toy
b : the sound-producing organ on a rattlesnake's tail
2a : a rapid succession of sharp clattering sounds
b : noise, racket

rattle

verb (2)
rattled; rattling\ ˈrat-​liŋ How to pronounce rattle (audio) , ˈra-​tᵊl-​iŋ \

Definition of rattle (Entry 3 of 3)

transitive verb

: to furnish with ratlines

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Choose the Right Synonym for rattle

Verb (1)

embarrass, discomfit, abash, disconcert, rattle mean to distress by confusing or confounding. embarrass implies some influence that impedes thought, speech, or action. the question embarrassed her so much she couldn't answer discomfit implies a hampering or frustrating accompanied by confusion. hecklers discomfited the speaker abash presupposes some initial self-confidence that receives a sudden check, producing shyness, shame, or a feeling of inferiority. abashed by her swift and cutting retort disconcert implies an upsetting of equanimity or assurance producing uncertainty or hesitancy. disconcerted by finding so many in attendance rattle implies an agitation that impairs thought and judgment. rattled by all the television cameras

Examples of rattle in a Sentence

Noun I'd go nuts if I had to endure the rattle of that bottling plant every day.
Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Patrick Beverley could not stop Doncic behind the perimeter and compensated for his lack of size with annoying tactics that did nothing to rattle Doncic. Mark Medina, USA TODAY, 29 May 2021 The latest inflation data is unlikely to rattle the Federal Reserve, which is charged with keeping prices stable and unemployment low. Washington Post, 28 May 2021 The acquisition, unveiled just days after AT&T announced a $43 billion plan on May 17 to spin off its WarnerMedia division, including HBO and Warner Bros., to Discovery, marks the latest major consolidation to rattle the entertainment industry. Erik Hayden, Billboard, 26 May 2021 That this whole process was a charade intended to rattle the alumni trees until the dollars started falling to ground to be collected in giant baskets. Ann Killion, San Francisco Chronicle, 24 May 2021 But the Bears coach saw enough through an iPad stream to rattle off a list of positives for his new quarterback Friday on the opening day of rookie minicamp at Halas Hall. Colleen Kane, chicagotribune.com, 15 May 2021 In Kyiv, some officials and Western diplomats believe that Mr. Putin’s troop buildup was an expensive and high-wire effort to rattle a Ukrainian government that had taken a tougher turn against Russia in recent months. New York Times, 23 Apr. 2021 The upcoming drill is representative of every springtime electrofishing survey — crank up the juice, rattle some cages and gather some useful trend data on bass populations. Dallas News, 8 May 2021 Hiring strangers to wear masks and rattle the doors of classrooms without letting students or faculty know, shooting teachers with rubber bullets, students with fake blood lying in the hallway being asked to play the role of victims. Heidi Stevens, chicagotribune.com, 30 Apr. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Paul made the first, missed the second and watched Embiid's long toss rattle in and out the rim at the horn. Duane Rankin, The Arizona Republic, 21 Apr. 2021 Along the gravel road heading south from Yuma, signs of recent crossings are ubiquitous: water bottles, shirts, beanies, a rattle. Miriam Jordan, Star Tribune, 16 May 2021 Along the gravel road heading south from Yuma, signs of recent crossings are ubiquitous: water bottles, shirts, beanies, a rattle. Miriam Jordan, New York Times, 16 May 2021 The quality noise canceling on the Life Q35 is exemplary and is able to cancel out external noises like aircraft engines, the hum of air-conditioning, keyboard sounds or the rhythmic rattle of a train running over railway tracks. Mark Sparrow, Forbes, 27 Apr. 2021 But there are hopes that a spate of Big Tech earnings this week could give markets a boost, especially as discussions of higher capital gains taxes on the wealthy rattle Wall Street. Julia Horowitz, CNN, 26 Apr. 2021 But also reconnecting with the sounds of a running river, a kingfisher’s rattle over the creek, even the pleasing tones of waves against a boat hull. T. Edward Nickens, Outdoor Life, 8 Mar. 2021 What’s needed is a compact, tack-driving, bolt-action rifle that’s also suppressor capable and ready for a rattle-can camo job. Richard Mann, Field & Stream, 18 Feb. 2021 The material is easily washable, non-slip, and rattle-proof. Popsci Commerce Team, Popular Science, 20 Jan. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Audience members rattle off names like George Floyd, Michael Brown and Breonna Taylor. John Blake, CNN, 22 May 2021 Garcetti can eloquently rattle off the successes on homelessness in terms of housing and services provided on his watch, and those achievements are not insignificant. Steve Lopez Columnist, Los Angeles Times, 15 May 2021 All the while, a soundtrack composed of children’s choirs and ukuleles rattle off in the distance, like the outtakes from a very productive iMac commercial studio session. Luke Winkie, Vulture, 4 May 2021 But the comments will rattle U.S.-Turkish relations, already on ice over a litany of disagreements, and could damage relations between Biden and Erdogan, who had a warm relationship with Trump. Ben Gittleson, ABC News, 24 Apr. 2021 Gunfire continues to rattle in the distance during the fade to black. Reid Mccarter, Wired, 10 Apr. 2021 The thoughts rattle around and then out pops something bright and shiny. Sarah Todd, Quartz, 31 Mar. 2021 The upcoming drill is representative of every springtime electrofishing survey — crank up the juice, rattle some cages and gather some useful trend data on bass populations. Dallas News, 8 May 2021 In that short time, Thunberg, a 17-year-old Swede, has become a figure of international standing, able to meet with sympathetic world leaders and rattle the unsympathetic. David Marchesephoto Illustration By Bráulio Amado, New York Times, 30 Oct. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'rattle.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of rattle

Verb (1)

14th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Noun

1519, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb (2)

1729, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for rattle

Verb (1)

Middle English ratelen; akin to Middle Dutch ratel rattle

Verb (2)

irregular from ratline

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Learn More about rattle

Time Traveler for rattle

Time Traveler

The first known use of rattle was in the 14th century

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Statistics for rattle

Last Updated

3 Jun 2021

Cite this Entry

“Rattle.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/rattle. Accessed 12 Jun. 2021.

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More Definitions for rattle

rattle

noun

English Language Learners Definition of rattle

: a series of short, loud sounds
: a baby's toy that makes a series of short sounds when it is shaken
: the group of hard, loose pieces (called scales) that cover the end of a rattlesnake's tail

rattle

verb
rat·​tle | \ ˈra-tᵊl How to pronounce rattle (audio) \
rattled; rattling

Kids Definition of rattle

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to make or cause to make a rapid series of short sharp sounds Wind rattled the windows.
2 : to move with a clatter A wagon rattled down the road.
3 : to speak or say quickly or without stopping He rattled off the answers.
4 : to disturb the calmness of : upset The question rattled the speaker.

rattle

noun

Kids Definition of rattle (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a series of short sharp sounds the rattle of dishes
2 : a toy that makes a rattling sound
3 : a part at the end of a rattlesnake's tail that makes a buzzing rattle when shaken

rattle

noun
rat·​tle | \ ˈrat-ᵊl How to pronounce rattle (audio) \

Medical Definition of rattle

1 : the sound-producing organ on a rattlesnake's tail
2 : a throat noise caused by air passing through mucus specifically : death rattle — compare rale, rhonchus

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