proclaim

verb
pro·​claim | \ prō-ˈklām How to pronounce proclaim (audio) , prə-\
proclaimed; proclaiming; proclaims

Definition of proclaim

transitive verb

1a : to declare publicly, typically insistently, proudly, or defiantly and in either speech or writing : announce
b : to give outward indication of : show his manner proclaimed his genteel upbringing
2 : to declare or declare to be solemnly, officially, or formally proclaim an amnesty proclaim the country a republic
3 : to praise or glorify openly or publicly : extol proclaimed the rescue workers' efforts

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Other Words from proclaim

proclaimer noun

Choose the Right Synonym for proclaim

declare, announce, proclaim, promulgate mean to make known publicly. declare implies explicitness and usually formality in making known. the referee declared the contest a draw announce implies the declaration of something for the first time. announced their engagement at a party proclaim implies declaring clearly, forcefully, and authoritatively. the president proclaimed a national day of mourning promulgate implies the proclaiming of a dogma, doctrine, or law. promulgated an edict of religious toleration

Did You Know?

The pro- in proclaim means "forward, out", so a proclamation is an "outward" statement intended for the public. We often think of proclamations as something issued by monarchs or dictators, but Lincoln was able to issue his Emancipation Proclamation because as president he had the power to free the slaves in certain areas. At a slightly lower level, a governor may proclaim a day in honor of the state's firemen, a movie critic may proclaim a director to be the best of all, or you may proclaim your New Year's resolutions to a crowd of friends.

Examples of proclaim in a Sentence

She proclaimed that she will run for governor. The President proclaimed a national day of mourning. He took command of the government and proclaimed himself emperor. The magazine proclaimed him to be the best player in baseball. He proclaimed his love for her in a poem. His behavior proclaimed his good upbringing.
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Recent Examples on the Web

Polis long has proclaimed his support for local control. Nic Garcia, The Denver Post, "The Spot: What the heck does “local control” even mean?," 6 June 2019 This story was corrected to remove reference on when Iran was officially proclaimed as an Islamic Republic; this took place weeks later. Nasser Karimi, The Seattle Times, "Iranians mark anniversary of victory day in 1979 revolution," 11 Feb. 2019 Originally published in Russia more than a decade ago, Marina and Sergey Dyachenko’s novel Vita Nostra earned considerable acclaim overseas, but while it was proclaimed the best fantasy novel of the 21st century, English readers were left out. Andrew Liptak, The Verge, "11 new sci-fi and fantasy books to check out in late November," 15 Nov. 2018 The Muelle Real and other parts of the historic center have been restored since parts of the city were proclaimed by UNESCO as a World Heritage Center in 2005. Mario J. Pentón, miamiherald, "Pollution is destroying the environment and livelihood for residents in this Cuban city," 7 June 2018 When they were proclaimed husband and wife, and cheers from outside could be heard inside the chapel. Fox News, "Meghan Markle, Prince Harry marry at St. George's Chapel in front of A-list guests, royal family," 19 May 2018 Advertising France has its own problems, of course, including persistent discrimination against residents with immigrant backgrounds despite a national motto proclaiming equality for all. Thomas Adamson, The Seattle Times, "France shows Britons splendor of citizenship as Brexit looms," 24 Mar. 2019 But the City of Kodiak employs more than 40 officers and its fire department, who are responsible for what is proclaimed as the largest commercial fishing port in Alaska with more than 770 vessels. Author: Naomi Klouda, Anchorage Daily News, "Kodiak governments latest to explore savings of consolidation," 6 Apr. 2018 John Legend and Chrissy Teigen just proclaimed their love for each other in a very permanent way: with matching tattoos. Kelly O'sullivan, Country Living, "John Legend and Chrissy Teigen Are Honoring Their Kids in a Very Permanent Way," 14 Apr. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'proclaim.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of proclaim

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for proclaim

Middle English proclamen, from Anglo-French or Latin; Anglo-French proclamer, from Latin proclamare, from pro- before + clamare to cry out — more at pro-, claim

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Statistics for proclaim

Last Updated

11 Jun 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for proclaim

The first known use of proclaim was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for proclaim

proclaim

verb

English Language Learners Definition of proclaim

: to say or state (something) in a public, official, or definite way : to declare or announce (something)
formal : to show (something) clearly

proclaim

verb
pro·​claim | \ prō-ˈklām How to pronounce proclaim (audio) \
proclaimed; proclaiming

Kids Definition of proclaim

: to announce publicly : declare The president proclaimed a holiday.

proclaim

transitive verb
pro·​claim | \ prō-ˈklām How to pronounce proclaim (audio) \

Legal Definition of proclaim

: to declare or declare to be solemnly, officially, or formally proclaim an amnesty

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More from Merriam-Webster on proclaim

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for proclaim

Spanish Central: Translation of proclaim

Nglish: Translation of proclaim for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of proclaim for Arabic Speakers

Comments on proclaim

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