expropriate

verb
ex·​pro·​pri·​ate | \ ek-ˈsprō-prē-ˌāt How to pronounce expropriate (audio) \
expropriated; expropriating

Definition of expropriate

transitive verb

1 : to deprive of possession or proprietary rights
2 : to transfer (the property of another) to one's own possession

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Other Words from expropriate

expropriator \ ek-​ˈsprō-​prē-​ˌā-​tər How to pronounce expropriate (audio) \ noun

Did You Know?

If you guessed that expropriate has something in common with the verb appropriate, you're right. Both words ultimately derive from the Latin adjective proprius, meaning "own." Expropriate came to us by way of the Medieval Latin verb expropriare, itself from Latin ex- ("out of" or "from") and proprius. Appropriate descends from Late Latin appropriare, which joins proprius and Latin ad- ("to" or "toward"). Both the verb appropriate ("to take possession of" or "to set aside for a particular use") and the adjective appropriate ("fitting" or "suitable") have been with us since the 15th century, and expropriate has been a part of the language since at least 1611. Other proprius descendants in English include proper and property.

Examples of expropriate in a Sentence

dissidents were shot, and their lands expropriated under his regime the state will have to expropriate scores of homeowners in order to build the new road
Recent Examples on the Web Since 2016, municipalities in the Catalonia region, including Barcelona, can expropriate landlords of properties that have been left vacant for more than two years through compulsory purchase, at 50 percent of market rate. Francisco Pérez, The New Republic, "The End of Housing As We Know It," 31 July 2020 In 2017, Austria’s highest court ruled that the government was within its rights to expropriate the building after its owners refused to sell it. Fox News, "Austria approves plan to turn Hitler's birthplace into a police station," 3 June 2020 To be white in antebellum America, for instance, was to be able to enslave Africans and expropriate native land. Jamelle Bouie, New York Times, "The Anti-Lockdown Protesters Have a Twisted Conception of Liberty," 8 May 2020 The country will move ahead with expropriating land without compensation, Ramaphosa said. Michael Cohen, Bloomberg.com, "South Africa’s Energy Crisis, Jobs Top ANC’s Priority List," 29 Apr. 2020 Hospital and health officials describe an opaque process in which federal officials sweep in without warning to expropriate supplies. Noam N. Levey, Anchorage Daily News, "Hospitals across US say feds are seizing masks and other coronavirus supplies without a word," 8 Apr. 2020 Hospital and health officials describe an opaque process in which federal officials sweep in without warning to expropriate supplies. Noam N. Levey, Anchorage Daily News, "Hospitals across US say feds are seizing masks and other coronavirus supplies without a word," 8 Apr. 2020 Medical systems across the country have reported shipments being expropriated in recent weeks, as previously reported by The Times. Los Angeles Times, "Trump plan for coronavirus supplies yields payoff for favored companies," 16 Apr. 2020 Hospital and health officials describe an opaque process in which federal officials sweep in without warning to expropriate supplies. Noam N. Levey, Anchorage Daily News, "Hospitals across US say feds are seizing masks and other coronavirus supplies without a word," 8 Apr. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'expropriate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of expropriate

1611, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for expropriate

Medieval Latin expropriatus, past participle of expropriare, from Latin ex- + proprius own

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Time Traveler for expropriate

Time Traveler

The first known use of expropriate was in 1611

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Cite this Entry

“Expropriate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/expropriate. Accessed 24 Jan. 2021.

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More Definitions for expropriate

expropriate

verb
How to pronounce expropriate (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of expropriate

formal : to take (someone's property)

expropriate

transitive verb
ex·​pro·​pri·​ate | \ ek-ˈsprō-prē-ˌāt How to pronounce expropriate (audio) \
expropriated; expropriating

Legal Definition of expropriate

: to take (property) of an individual in the exercise of state sovereignty (as by eminent domain)

Other Words from expropriate

expropriation \ ek-​ˌsprō-​prē-​ˈā-​shən How to pronounce expropriate (audio) \ noun

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