usurp

verb
\ yu̇-ˈsərp How to pronounce usurp (audio) also -ˈzərp How to pronounce usurp (audio) \
usurped; usurping; usurps

Definition of usurp

transitive verb

1a : to seize and hold (office, place, functions, powers, etc.) in possession by force or without right usurp a throne
b : to take or make use of without right usurped the rights to her life story
2 : to take the place of by or as if by force : supplant must not let stock responses based on inherited prejudice usurp careful judgment

intransitive verb

: to seize or exercise authority or possession wrongfully

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Other Words from usurp

usurpation \ ˌyü-​sər-​ˈpā-​shən How to pronounce usurp (audio) also  ˌyü-​zər-​ \ noun

Did You Know?

Usurp was borrowed into English in the 14th century from the Anglo-French word usorper, which in turn derives from the Latin verb usurpare, meaning "to take possession of without a legal claim." Usurpare itself was formed by combining usu (a form of usus, meaning "use") and rapere ("to seize"). Other descendants of rapere in English include rapacious ("given to seizing or extorting what is coveted"), rapine ("the seizing and carrying away of things by force"), rapt (the earliest sense of which is "lifted up and carried away"), and ravish ("to seize and take away by violence").

Examples of usurp in a Sentence

Some people have accused city council members of trying to usurp the mayor's power. attempting to usurp the throne
Recent Examples on the Web The letter, signed by Mayor Steve Vaus and council members, argued the ordinance would usurp local control. Phillip Molnar, San Diego Union-Tribune, 3 May 2021 Do not usurp those precious processing cycles from the life-or-death matters of driving the vehicle. Lance Eliot, Forbes, 15 Apr. 2021 Republicans said that the point of new legislation is not to disenfranchise Black people and that federal legislation would usurp state's rights. Meg Cunningham, ABC News, 20 Apr. 2021 The stark reappraisal was sparked by the shocking announcement April 3 that former Crown Prince Hamzah, Abdullah’s half-brother, had been caught in a purported plot to usurp the throne with the help of his loyalists and shadowy foreign backers. Nabih Bulos, Los Angeles Times, 18 Apr. 2021 Hughes said Harris County’s efforts in November tried to usurp the authority of the Legislature by making up new rules for voting. James Barragán, Dallas News, 31 Mar. 2021 But now, human hybridizers are stepping in to usurp the role of the bee, carefully removing the pollen of one plant to fertilize another. Washington Post, 18 Mar. 2021 Beyond the cup and Sunday’s presidential election, Barca also have faith in being able to usurp Atletico Madrid at the La Liga summit. Tom Sanderson, Forbes, 1 Mar. 2021 Among Wagner’s clients was Osorio, who in July began a covert campaign to usurp the same board that couldn’t be bothered to respond quickly to his emergency. Matthew Sedacca, Curbed, 20 Jan. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'usurp.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of usurp

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

History and Etymology for usurp

Middle English, from Anglo-French usorper, from Latin usurpare to take possession of without legal claim, from usu (ablative of usus use) + rapere to seize — more at rapid

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Time Traveler for usurp

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The first known use of usurp was in the 14th century

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Last Updated

21 May 2021

Cite this Entry

“Usurp.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/usurp. Accessed 12 Jun. 2021.

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More Definitions for usurp

usurp

verb

English Language Learners Definition of usurp

formal : to take and keep (something, such as power) in a forceful or violent way and especially without the right to do so

usurp

verb
\ yu̇-ˈsərp How to pronounce usurp (audio) , -ˈzərp \
usurped; usurping

Kids Definition of usurp

: to take and hold unfairly or by force The traitors usurp power from the king.

Other Words from usurp

usurper noun

usurp

verb
\ yu̇-ˈsərp, -ˈzərp How to pronounce usurp (audio) \

Legal Definition of usurp

transitive verb

: to seize and hold (as office, place, or powers) in possession by force or without right the courts may not usurp the powers of the legislature

intransitive verb

: to seize or exercise authority or possession wrongfully

Other Words from usurp

usurpation \ ˌyü-​sər-​ˈpā-​shən, -​zər-​ How to pronounce usurp (audio) \ noun
usurper \ yu̇-​ˈsər-​pər, -​ˈzər-​ How to pronounce usurp (audio) \ noun

History and Etymology for usurp

Latin usurpare to take possession of without a strict legal claim, from usus use + rapere to seize

More from Merriam-Webster on usurp

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for usurp

Nglish: Translation of usurp for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of usurp for Arabic Speakers

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