excessive

adjective
ex·​ces·​sive | \ ik-ˈse-siv How to pronounce excessive (audio) \

Definition of excessive

: exceeding what is usual, proper, necessary, or normal

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Other Words from excessive

excessively adverb
excessiveness noun

Choose the Right Synonym for excessive

excessive, immoderate, inordinate, extravagant, exorbitant, extreme mean going beyond a normal limit. excessive implies an amount or degree too great to be reasonable or acceptable. excessive punishment immoderate implies lack of desirable or necessary restraint. immoderate spending inordinate implies an exceeding of the limits dictated by reason or good judgment. inordinate pride extravagant implies an indifference to restraints imposed by truth, prudence, or good taste. extravagant claims for the product exorbitant implies a departure from accepted standards regarding amount or degree. exorbitant prices extreme may imply an approach to the farthest limit possible or conceivable but commonly means only to a notably high degree. extreme shyness

Examples of excessive in a Sentence

an excessive display of wealth High fever, nausea, and excessive sweating are some of the symptoms.
Recent Examples on the Web On April 30, night two of the 1992 Los Angeles riots, which occurred after a trial jury acquitted the four officers who used excessive force against Rodney King during an arrest, the network was ready to air a rerun. Zoe Haylock, Vulture, "Arsenio Hall on Hosting His Talk Show During the L.A. Riots: ‘I Was Twitter’," 16 Feb. 2021 However, Mesa police rarely face consequences for using excessive force. AZCentral.com, "Arizona ranks No. 1 for shootings by US Marshals Service task forces, investigation shows," 11 Feb. 2021 As demonstrations for racial justice swept California last summer, protesters complained that they were frequently met with excessive force from police who relied on militarized tactics to break up largely peaceful gatherings. Alexei Koseff, San Francisco Chronicle, "California bill would limit police from buying military-style gear," 8 Feb. 2021 George Floyd’s death in May at the hands of Minneapolis officers has amplified criticism of police for using excessive force. Jacob Turcotte, The Christian Science Monitor, "Shootings by police: Would hiring older recruits stem the tide?," 3 Feb. 2021 Video of the confrontation was shared widely online and Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms and then-Police Chief Erika Shields decided the two officers had used excessive force and must be fired immediately. Kate Brumback, ajc, "Firings of officers after students pulled from car reversed," 2 Feb. 2021 Under the judge’s order, only Code’s arrest, among the six cases showing what may have been excessive force, can be used at Chauvin’s trial. Jamiles Lartey, BostonGlobe.com, "‘Don’t kill me’: Others tell of abuse by officer who knelt on George Floyd," 2 Feb. 2021 Under the judge’s order, only Ms. Code’s arrest, among the six cases showing what may have been excessive force, can be used at Mr. Chauvin’s trial. New York Times, "‘Don’t Kill Me’: Others Tell of Abuse by Officer Who Knelt on George Floyd," 2 Feb. 2021 The poll also found that 51% of Americans thought the looting and vandalism that occurred across the country around Black Lives Matter demonstrations was a bigger problem than excessive force by police. NBC News, "Report: Hate groups in decline, migrate to online networks," 1 Feb. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'excessive.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of excessive

14th century, in the meaning defined above

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Time Traveler for excessive

Time Traveler

The first known use of excessive was in the 14th century

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Statistics for excessive

Last Updated

22 Feb 2021

Cite this Entry

“Excessive.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/excessive. Accessed 28 Feb. 2021.

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More Definitions for excessive

excessive

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of excessive

: going beyond what is usual, normal, or proper

excessive

adjective
ex·​ces·​sive | \ ik-ˈse-siv How to pronounce excessive (audio) \

Kids Definition of excessive

: being too much excessive talking

Other Words from excessive

excessively adverb

excessive

adjective
ex·​ces·​sive

Legal Definition of excessive

: exceeding what is proper, necessary, or normal specifically : being out of proportion to the offense excessive bail

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Comments on excessive

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