lavish

adjective
lav·​ish | \ ˈla-vish How to pronounce lavish (audio) \

Definition of lavish

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : expending or bestowing profusely : prodigal lavish donors lavish in giving praise to her employees
2a : expended or produced in abundance the lavish attentions of his mother— George Meredith
b : marked by profusion or excess a lavish feast a lavish home

lavish

verb
lavished; lavishing; lavishes

Definition of lavish (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to expend or bestow with profusion : squander

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Other Words from lavish

Adjective

lavishly adverb
lavishness noun

Choose the Right Synonym for lavish

Adjective

profuse, lavish, prodigal, luxuriant, lush, exuberant mean giving or given out in great abundance. profuse implies pouring forth without restraint. profuse apologies lavish suggests an unstinted or unmeasured profusion. a lavish party prodigal implies reckless or wasteful lavishness threatening to lead to early exhaustion of resources. prodigal spending luxuriant suggests a rich and splendid abundance. a luxuriant beard lush suggests rich, soft luxuriance. a lush green lawn exuberant implies marked vitality or vigor in what produces abundantly. an exuberant imagination

Examples of lavish in a Sentence

Adjective a lavish display of flowers this lavish consumption of our natural resources simply cannot continue Verb doting parents lavishing lots of attention on their children a great actor who lavished his talent in lousy movies
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective It’s not exactly a turnkey house, because the lavish custom furnishings are not included. Judy Rose, Detroit Free Press, "$3.9M mansion has lavish theater, custom design — and stunning backyard," 13 Feb. 2021 Decked out with a lavish marble lobby, it was built with the intention of being a comfortable and polished spot for business travelers and Hollywood tourists to enjoy. Selena Barrientos, Good Housekeeping, "The True Timeline of the Cecil Hotel's Dark History," 13 Feb. 2021 Julian Sands stars as a sociopathic CEO who, with his just-as-nuts wife Kiwi (a great Molly Hagan), pushes two of his workers to the edge of insanity in his lavish mansion. Brian Tallerico, Vulture, "Which Into the Dark Episodes Are Worth Your Time?," 12 Feb. 2021 Some had quite humble appetites while others went all-out on lavish ingredients and dishes. Paul Stephen, San Antonio Express-News, "4 dishes beloved by great presidents past for Presidents' Day: chicken fricassee, hoecakes, apple pandowdy, white bean soup," 10 Feb. 2021 More interested in building lavish houses and causing neighborhood drama than attending a day job and climbing that corporate ladder? Reece Rogers, Wired, "8 Tips to Transform Your Sims 4 Gameplay," 4 Feb. 2021 With potential earnings in the eight figures after this manic week, Gill can suddenly afford to treat himself to the only lavish indulgence on his wish list. Joshua Robinson, WSJ, "Roaring Kitty Wanted to Break a 4-Minute Mile. He Broke Wall Street Instead.," 30 Jan. 2021 The property claims a leafy half-acre in the Cocoplum community, an affluent enclave where Latin singer Marc Anthony is currently trying to sell his lavish Mediterranean mansion for $27 million. Jack Flemming, Los Angeles Times, "Shaggy spends $2.15 million on a leafy retreat in Florida," 26 Jan. 2021 The video alleged that the vast, lavish property, said to include vineyards and an underground hockey rink, was controlled by friends and close associates of Mr. Putin who were holding it for him. New York Times, "E.U. Condemns Arrest of Navalny and Supporters but Takes No Action Yet," 25 Jan. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Taxpayers shouldn’t have to lavish money on the club of former presidents, lawmakers reasoned, since corporate America was already doing it so nicely. Tribune News Service, oregonlive, "Congress debates former presidents’ perks, including Secret Service protection, pension, office space," 15 Jan. 2021 If true, this would suggest that the story of our solar system’s turbulent history is stored within chondrules themselves, offering yet another reason to lavish them with careful attention. Jonathan O'callaghan, Scientific American, "Asteroid Dust from Hayabusa2 Could Solve a Mystery of Planet Creation," 8 Dec. 2020 All three are a case study in places not to lavish lots of energy. Shawn Tully, Fortune, "Trump fancies himself an incredible closer—but is it enough to make him a winner?," 3 Nov. 2020 Starting in March, an inordinate number of us were looking for a new hobby to stay busy with, to lavish our sudden abundance of free time and attention on — and to keep our minds off the strange illness striking people down all over the world. Jennifer Bolton, Houston Chronicle, "Houston's rare plant business is blooming because of the pandemic," 13 Oct. 2020 Nobody pining for mere self-expression, or craving a therapeutic blurt, could lavish on a paramour, as Berryman did, lines as elaborately wrought as these: Loves are the summer’s. Anthony Lane, The New Yorker, "The Heartsick Hilarity of John Berryman’s Letters," 12 Oct. 2020 In their case, the callers on the other end were executives from No Limit and Cash Money Records, and destiny came in the form of an aesthetic legacy that would lavish the frontispieces for 12 platinum and 38 gold albums. Washington Post, "Like most sequels, ‘Savage Mode II’ is an underwhelming blockbuster," 8 Oct. 2020 Drug companies often continue to lavish money and prestige on disgraced investigators. Charles Piller, Science | AAAS, "FDA’s own documents reveal agency’s lax, slow, and secretive oversight of clinical research," 1 Oct. 2020 But a documentary series coming this winter promises to lavish a bit more attention on eating and drinking in the Rose City. oregonlive, "Portland restaurants (and local critic Karen Brooks) get camera time in ‘Eater’s Guide to the World’," 19 Sep. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'lavish.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of lavish

Adjective

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1542, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for lavish

Adjective and Verb

Middle English laves, lavage, probably from Middle French lavasse, lavache downpour of rain, from laver to wash — more at lavage

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Time Traveler for lavish

Time Traveler

The first known use of lavish was in the 15th century

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Statistics for lavish

Last Updated

21 Feb 2021

Cite this Entry

“Lavish.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/lavish. Accessed 5 Mar. 2021.

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More Definitions for lavish

lavish

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of lavish

: giving or using a large amount of something
: given in large amounts
: having a very rich and expensive quality

lavish

adjective
lav·​ish | \ ˈla-vish How to pronounce lavish (audio) \

Kids Definition of lavish

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : giving or involving a large amount : extravagant The lobby contained a lavish display of flowers.
2 : spent, produced, or given in large amounts She received lavish praise.

Other Words from lavish

lavishly adverb

lavish

verb
lavished; lavishing

Kids Definition of lavish (Entry 2 of 2)

: to spend, use, or give in large amounts They lavished attention on the children.

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Comments on lavish

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