inordinate

adjective
in·​or·​di·​nate | \ in-ˈȯr-də-nət , -ˈȯrd-nət\

Definition of inordinate

1 : exceeding reasonable limits : immoderate
2 archaic : disorderly, unregulated

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Other Words from inordinate

inordinately adverb
inordinateness noun

Choose the Right Synonym for inordinate

excessive, immoderate, inordinate, extravagant, exorbitant, extreme mean going beyond a normal limit. excessive implies an amount or degree too great to be reasonable or acceptable. excessive punishment immoderate implies lack of desirable or necessary restraint. immoderate spending inordinate implies an exceeding of the limits dictated by reason or good judgment. inordinate pride extravagant implies an indifference to restraints imposed by truth, prudence, or good taste. extravagant claims for the product exorbitant implies a departure from accepted standards regarding amount or degree. exorbitant prices extreme may imply an approach to the farthest limit possible or conceivable but commonly means only to a notably high degree. extreme shyness

Did You Know?

At one time if something was "inordinate," it did not conform to the expected or desired order of things. That sense, synonymous with "disorderly" or "unregulated," is now archaic, but it offers a hint at the origins of "inordinate." The word traces back to the Latin verb ordinare, meaning "to arrange," combined with the negative prefix in-. "Ordinare" is also the ancestor of such English words as "coordination," "subordinate," "ordination," and "ordain." "Ordinare" did not give us "order," "orderly," or "disorderly," but the root of those words is the same Latin noun ("ordo") from which "ordinare" itself derives.

Examples of inordinate in a Sentence

I waited an inordinate amount of time. They have had an inordinate number of problems with the schedule.

Recent Examples on the Web

Once through the slot and after negotiating their way down a chute, Tucker and Hunter were in a final chamber that had an inordinate number of fossils. Lydia Pyne, Ars Technica, "Rising Star found a new species—now it wants to find a new way for paleoanthropology," 20 Dec. 2018 The authors followed up on many ramifications of their initial findings and did an inordinate number of experiments to bolster each of their assertions. Diana Gitig, Ars Technica, "Sugar cures cancer! (Not really, but one sugar may help chemo)," 21 Nov. 2018 After a game in which Reid was ejected for a hit on Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger, Reid said the ejection wasn’t warranted and indicated he has been tapped for an inordinate number of random drug tests since joining the team. Andrew Beaton, WSJ, "The Outspoken Voice of the NFL Player Protests—and It Isn’t Colin Kaepernick," 13 Nov. 2018 The second point from Swiped that rings true—and it’s tied into the conversation about capitalism—is that women put an inordinate amount of work into the mechanics of dating, relative to men. Cady Drell, Marie Claire, "HBO's 'Swiped' Argues That Silicon Valley Must Fix the Dating Mess It Created," 10 Sep. 2018 Ub, Glisic said, has produced an inordinate number of professional soccer players. James Montague, New York Times, "Leading Serbia at World Cup, Nemanja Matic Has One Foot Rooted at Home," 22 June 2018 Some animals demand an inordinate amount of time, which, depending on your lifestyle, may sway you to choose one type of pet over another. Karen Asp, Good Housekeeping, "10 Questions to Ask Before Adopting a Pet," 30 Aug. 2012 In a February report, Justice Minister Tudorel Toader had accused Kovesi of being authoritarian, and claimed that prosecutors under her command had falsified evidence and an inordinate number of defendants had been acquitted. Fox News, "Romania's chief anti-graft prosecutor fired," 10 July 2018 In a February report, Justice Minister Tudorel Toader had accused Kovesi of being authoritarian and claimed that prosecutors under her command had falsified evidence and that an inordinate number of defendants had been acquitted. Washington Post, "World Digest: July 9, 2018," 9 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'inordinate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of inordinate

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for inordinate

Middle English inordinat, from Latin inordinatus, from in- + ordinatus, past participle of ordinare to arrange — more at ordain

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Last Updated

7 Jan 2019

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Time Traveler for inordinate

The first known use of inordinate was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for inordinate

inordinate

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of inordinate

: going beyond what is usual, normal, or proper

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