immoderate

adjective
im·​mod·​er·​ate | \ (ˌ)i(m)-ˈmä-d(ə-)rət How to pronounce immoderate (audio) \

Definition of immoderate

: exceeding just, usual, or suitable bounds immoderate pride an immoderate appetite

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Other Words from immoderate

immoderately adverb
immoderateness noun
immoderation \ (ˌ)i-​ˌmä-​də-​ˈrā-​shən How to pronounce immoderate (audio) \ noun

Choose the Right Synonym for immoderate

excessive, immoderate, inordinate, extravagant, exorbitant, extreme mean going beyond a normal limit. excessive implies an amount or degree too great to be reasonable or acceptable. excessive punishment immoderate implies lack of desirable or necessary restraint. immoderate spending inordinate implies an exceeding of the limits dictated by reason or good judgment. inordinate pride extravagant implies an indifference to restraints imposed by truth, prudence, or good taste. extravagant claims for the product exorbitant implies a departure from accepted standards regarding amount or degree. exorbitant prices extreme may imply an approach to the farthest limit possible or conceivable but commonly means only to a notably high degree. extreme shyness

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Immoderate, "excessive," "inordinate, "extravagant," "exorbitant," and "extreme" all mean going beyond a normal limit. "Immoderate" suggests a lack of desirable or necessary restraint ("immoderate spending"). "Excessive" implies an amount or degree too great to be reasonable or acceptable ("excessive punishment"). "Inordinate" implies an exceeding of the limits dictated by reason or good judgment ("inordinate pride"). "Extravagant" implies an indifference to restraints imposed by truth, prudence, or good taste ("extravagant claims for the product"). "Exorbitant" has connotations of a departure from accepted standards regarding amount or degree ("exorbitant prices"). "Extreme" may imply an approach to the farthest limit possible or conceivable, but commonly means only to a notably high degree ("extreme shyness").

Examples of immoderate in a Sentence

the young widow remarried with what was regarded as immoderate haste by most observers
Recent Examples on the Web In my reading, Louie has been accused of immoderate desire, and the story is her response. Amy Weiss-meyer, The Atlantic, 16 May 2021 Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, isn’t their willingness to pursue traditional Democratic goals by immoderate methods but their embrace of radical progressivism. Barton Swaim, WSJ, 12 Apr. 2021 But the immoderate 6-year-old remains his default setting. Reggie Ugwu, New York Times, 12 Mar. 2020 And that number just grows larger every year, well ahead of inflation and vastly in excess of any possible spending even the most immoderate lifestyles might allow. Ian Bogost, The Atlantic, 7 Nov. 2019 Fascism and communism found the modern form of individual liberty lacking, and sought to reinject community—albeit in monstrous, immoderate ways that trampled on liberty. Nick Burns, The New Republic, 7 Aug. 2019 Louis has since emerged as the French literary world’s most implacable, immoderate opponent of Emmanuel Macron, the young president whose promises of national renewal have lately run aground. Jason Farago, The New York Review of Books, 18 Apr. 2019 The old-guard corporatists are under attack from activists with radical goals and immoderate tempers. Jeet Heer, The New Republic, 6 July 2018 Procedural tactics circumventing the Byrd Rule would signal the enactment of immoderate legislation—legislation that could unleash severe harm on the economy. Rebecca M. Kysar, Slate Magazine, 1 June 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'immoderate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of immoderate

14th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for immoderate

Middle English immoderat, from Latin immoderatus, from in- + moderatus, past participle of moderare to moderate

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Time Traveler for immoderate

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The first known use of immoderate was in the 14th century

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Last Updated

23 May 2021

Cite this Entry

“Immoderate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/immoderate. Accessed 16 Jun. 2021.

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More Definitions for immoderate

immoderate

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of immoderate

formal : going beyond reasonable limits : not moderate

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