immoderate

adjective
im·​mod·​er·​ate | \(ˌ)i(m)-ˈmä-d(ə-)rət \

Definition of immoderate 

: exceeding just, usual, or suitable bounds immoderate pride an immoderate appetite

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Other Words from immoderate

immoderately adverb
immoderateness noun
immoderation \ (ˌ)i-​ˌmä-​də-​ˈrā-​shən \ noun

Choose the Right Synonym for immoderate

excessive, immoderate, inordinate, extravagant, exorbitant, extreme mean going beyond a normal limit. excessive implies an amount or degree too great to be reasonable or acceptable. excessive punishment immoderate implies lack of desirable or necessary restraint. immoderate spending inordinate implies an exceeding of the limits dictated by reason or good judgment. inordinate pride extravagant implies an indifference to restraints imposed by truth, prudence, or good taste. extravagant claims for the product exorbitant implies a departure from accepted standards regarding amount or degree. exorbitant prices extreme may imply an approach to the farthest limit possible or conceivable but commonly means only to a notably high degree. extreme shyness

Did You Know?

Immoderate, "excessive," "inordinate, "extravagant," "exorbitant," and "extreme" all mean going beyond a normal limit. "Immoderate" suggests a lack of desirable or necessary restraint ("immoderate spending"). "Excessive" implies an amount or degree too great to be reasonable or acceptable ("excessive punishment"). "Inordinate" implies an exceeding of the limits dictated by reason or good judgment ("inordinate pride"). "Extravagant" implies an indifference to restraints imposed by truth, prudence, or good taste ("extravagant claims for the product"). "Exorbitant" has connotations of a departure from accepted standards regarding amount or degree ("exorbitant prices"). "Extreme" may imply an approach to the farthest limit possible or conceivable, but commonly means only to a notably high degree ("extreme shyness").

Examples of immoderate in a Sentence

the young widow remarried with what was regarded as immoderate haste by most observers

Recent Examples on the Web

The old-guard corporatists are under attack from activists with radical goals and immoderate tempers. Jeet Heer, The New Republic, "The Democratic Party is on an identity quest.," 6 July 2018 Procedural tactics circumventing the Byrd Rule would signal the enactment of immoderate legislation—legislation that could unleash severe harm on the economy. Rebecca M. Kysar, Slate Magazine, "The Tricks That Will Deliver Tax Reform," 1 June 2017 But even if our aspirations for a night of undomesticated, immoderate revelry were unfulfilled, the two-family trip was a revelation in less dramatic but equally significant ways. Freda Moon, New York Times, "We Wanted a Carefree Family Trip. So We Invited a Second Family.," 6 Sep. 2017 American liberalism was once associated with something far more robust, with immoderate presidents and spectacular waves of legislation like Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal and Lyndon Johnson’s Great Society. Nikil Saval, New York Times, "Hated by the Right. Mocked by the Left. Who Wants to Be ‘Liberal’ Anymore?," 5 July 2017 That’s just one of several recent comments offering insight into what looks like a moderate makeover for an immoderate president. Jill Colvin, The Denver Post, "Has White House experience tempered Donald Trump?," 13 Apr. 2017 Canada’s finance minister is pushing other levels of government to take steps to curb immoderate activity in Toronto’s real-estate market, as worries about a possible housing bubble mount. Paul Vieira, WSJ, "Policy Makers Work to Prevent Housing Bubble in Canada’s Biggest Cities," 6 Apr. 2017 Vast structures always indicate some corresponding excess, some immoderate concentration and accumulation of the labor of humanity. Bruce Sterling, WIRED, "Musings in Italian History," 28 Feb. 2008 President Obama pursued an immoderate agenda disguised as an exercise in moderation. Charles Kesler, WSJ, "The Promise of President Trump: Charles Kesler," 19 Jan. 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'immoderate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of immoderate

14th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for immoderate

Middle English immoderat, from Latin immoderatus, from in- + moderatus, past participle of moderare to moderate

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Time Traveler for immoderate

The first known use of immoderate was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for immoderate

immoderate

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of immoderate

: going beyond reasonable limits : not moderate

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