exorbitant

adjective
ex·​or·​bi·​tant | \ ig-ˈzȯr-bə-tənt How to pronounce exorbitant (audio) \

Definition of exorbitant

1 : not coming within the scope of the law
2 : exceeding the customary or appropriate limits in intensity, quality, amount, or size

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Other Words from exorbitant

exorbitantly adverb

Choose the Right Synonym for exorbitant

excessive, immoderate, inordinate, extravagant, exorbitant, extreme mean going beyond a normal limit. excessive implies an amount or degree too great to be reasonable or acceptable. excessive punishment immoderate implies lack of desirable or necessary restraint. immoderate spending inordinate implies an exceeding of the limits dictated by reason or good judgment. inordinate pride extravagant implies an indifference to restraints imposed by truth, prudence, or good taste. extravagant claims for the product exorbitant implies a departure from accepted standards regarding amount or degree. exorbitant prices extreme may imply an approach to the farthest limit possible or conceivable but commonly means only to a notably high degree. extreme shyness

How Was exorbitant First Used?

The first use of "exorbitant" in English was "wandering or deviating from the normal or ordinary course." That sense is now archaic, but it provides a hint as to the origins of "exorbitant": the word derives from Late Latin exorbitans, the present participle of the verb exorbitare, meaning "to deviate." "Exorbitare" in turn was formed by combining the prefix ex-, meaning "out of," with the noun orbita, meaning "track of a wheel or "rut." ("Orbita" itself traces back to "orbis," the Latin word for "disk" or "hoop.") In the 15th century "exorbitant" came to refer to something which fell outside of the normal or intended scope of the law. Eventually, it developed an extended sense as a synonym of "excessive."

Examples of exorbitant in a Sentence

The citizens of Xiaoli Village move lazily, with a languor born of chronic underemployment. They are farmers by tradition, but exorbitant taxes have leached any profitability out of their profession. — Hannah Beech, Time, 27 Oct. 2003 As with the black truffle, foie gras is as exorbitant ($52 a pound) as it is decadent (one gram of foie gras can reportedly be 900 calories). — Heather Morgan, Traveler, April 2000 … I recommend that the Congress adopt … [a] continuation of the law for the renegotiation of war contracts—which will prevent exorbitant profits and assure fair prices to the Government. — Franklin D. Roosevelt 11 Jan. 1944, in Nothing to Fear by B. D. Zevin1946 They were charged exorbitant rates for phone calls. the cost of our stay was so exorbitant you would have thought that we had bought the hotel and not just spent a few nights there
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Recent Examples on the Web

One possible explanation is the exorbitant housing costs in the cities with the most productive economies, like New York and California. David Yanofsky, Quartz, "Every state recession since 2007 and why they matter," 11 Sep. 2019 One look across the North West at Liverpool would show what a reliable central defender and surging right back can do for a club's fortunes–even at an exorbitant cost. Avi Creditor, SI.com, "The Top 10 Summer Transfer Window Classes Around Europe," 3 Sep. 2019 Unlike most scientists, who will only send up research equipment given the exorbitant cost of a private astronaut mission, the ultra-wealthy will be able to visit the ISS themselves. Stefanie Waldek, Condé Nast Traveler, "You Can Soon Vacation in Space for $35,000 Per Night," 10 June 2019 But the most unbridled eating happened on private estates, where the best serf cooks were paid exorbitant salaries and sent abroad for training. Alex Halberstadt, Town & Country, "The Surreal Thrill of Moscow Dining," 9 Oct. 2015 Senate Bill 1264, signed into law in June and effective Jan. 1, stops patients from being blindsided by exorbitant medical bills for emergency services, services provided at in-network hospitals and other facilities, and for lab work. Dallas News, "Texas legislature's fix to surprise health care bills still leaves millions vulnerable," 19 Aug. 2019 The private equity billionaire is taking heat for his firm’s acquisition of one of the nation’s leading prison phone companies, which has been accused of charging inmates and their families exorbitant rates. Los Angeles Times, "Newsletter: Consumers would be more forgiving of data breaches if companies just came clean," 9 Sep. 2019 The workers will vote for me in 2020 (lowest unemployment, most jobs ever), and should stop paying exorbitant $Dues, not worth it! Emily Tillett, CBS News, "On Labor Day, Trump slams top union leader and NAFTA," 2 Sep. 2019 Public companies have become equally adept at outsourcing, automating and laying off employees, and now routinely load up their top executives with exorbitant stock grants and performance bonuses. Steven Pearlstein, Washington Post, "Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s plan for private equity has good aims but misses the mark," 27 July 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'exorbitant.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of exorbitant

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for exorbitant

Middle English, from Late Latin exorbitant-, exorbitans, present participle of exorbitare to deviate, from Latin ex- + orbita track of a wheel, rut, from orbis disk, hoop

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Statistics for exorbitant

Last Updated

17 Oct 2019

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Time Traveler for exorbitant

The first known use of exorbitant was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for exorbitant

exorbitant

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of exorbitant

: going far beyond what is fair, reasonable, or expected : too high, expensive, etc.

exorbitant

adjective
ex·​or·​bi·​tant | \ ig-ˈzȯr-bə-tənt How to pronounce exorbitant (audio) \

Kids Definition of exorbitant

: more than what is fair, reasonable, or expected exorbitant prices

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