exorbitant

adjective
ex·​or·​bi·​tant | \ ig-ˈzȯr-bə-tənt How to pronounce exorbitant (audio) \

Definition of exorbitant

1 : not coming within the scope of the law
2 : exceeding the customary or appropriate limits in intensity, quality, amount, or size

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Other Words from exorbitant

exorbitantly adverb

Choose the Right Synonym for exorbitant

excessive, immoderate, inordinate, extravagant, exorbitant, extreme mean going beyond a normal limit. excessive implies an amount or degree too great to be reasonable or acceptable. excessive punishment immoderate implies lack of desirable or necessary restraint. immoderate spending inordinate implies an exceeding of the limits dictated by reason or good judgment. inordinate pride extravagant implies an indifference to restraints imposed by truth, prudence, or good taste. extravagant claims for the product exorbitant implies a departure from accepted standards regarding amount or degree. exorbitant prices extreme may imply an approach to the farthest limit possible or conceivable but commonly means only to a notably high degree. extreme shyness

How Was exorbitant First Used?

The first use of "exorbitant" in English was "wandering or deviating from the normal or ordinary course." That sense is now archaic, but it provides a hint as to the origins of "exorbitant": the word derives from Late Latin exorbitans, the present participle of the verb exorbitare, meaning "to deviate." "Exorbitare" in turn was formed by combining the prefix ex-, meaning "out of," with the noun orbita, meaning "track of a wheel or "rut." ("Orbita" itself traces back to "orbis," the Latin word for "disk" or "hoop.") In the 15th century "exorbitant" came to refer to something which fell outside of the normal or intended scope of the law. Eventually, it developed an extended sense as a synonym of "excessive."

Examples of exorbitant in a Sentence

The citizens of Xiaoli Village move lazily, with a languor born of chronic underemployment. They are farmers by tradition, but exorbitant taxes have leached any profitability out of their profession. — Hannah Beech, Time, 27 Oct. 2003 As with the black truffle, foie gras is as exorbitant ($52 a pound) as it is decadent (one gram of foie gras can reportedly be 900 calories). — Heather Morgan, Traveler, April 2000 … I recommend that the Congress adopt … [a] continuation of the law for the renegotiation of war contracts—which will prevent exorbitant profits and assure fair prices to the Government. — Franklin D. Roosevelt 11 Jan. 1944, in Nothing to Fear by B. D. Zevin1946 They were charged exorbitant rates for phone calls. the cost of our stay was so exorbitant you would have thought that we had bought the hotel and not just spent a few nights there
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Recent Examples on the Web

Oakland teachers have been working without a contract since 2017 and say their salaries are not keeping up with the exorbitant cost of living in the San Francisco Bay Area. Jocelyn Gecker, The Seattle Times, "Oakland teachers to walk off the job Thursday," 20 Feb. 2019 The consequences of exorbitant fees can ultimately be dire. Li Zhou, Vox, "Banning overdraft fees: Cory Booker’s new idea to tackle big banks," 2 Aug. 2018 But lately, he's spent an exorbitant amount of time in the public eye. Caroline Picard, Good Housekeeping, "Meghan Markle and Her Dad: A Timeline of Their Rocky Relationship," 6 Mar. 2019 But by Friday, Trump acknowledged that the costs would be exorbitant. Anne Flaherty, Fox News, "How Trump's big military parade evaporated into thin air," 17 Aug. 2018 Ocean City officials say the price for that tradeoff could be exorbitant, in the millions of dollars. Scott Dance, baltimoresun.com, "A wind farm developer offered Ocean City free electricity, but resort town is still fighting offshore turbines," 11 June 2018 When the firms sign up new customers, the cost to acquire them is exorbitant. The Economist, "Upstart meal-kit companies may need a new recipe for growth," 12 Apr. 2018 The cost was so exorbitant that many people leased a portion of a cab/medallion, sharing it with several other people and driving 24 hours a day to recoup their investment. Chris Cillizza, CNN, "Michael Cohen and the absolutely amazing history of the once-coveted New York City taxi medallion," 10 Apr. 2018 If that’s the case, the cost of the paying for all of a surrogate’s prenatal care out-of-pocket would be exorbitant. The Cut, The Cut, "The Dad Who Paid $171,000 to Become a Father," 15 Mar. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'exorbitant.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of exorbitant

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for exorbitant

Middle English, from Late Latin exorbitant-, exorbitans, present participle of exorbitare to deviate, from Latin ex- + orbita track of a wheel, rut, from orbis disk, hoop

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Statistics for exorbitant

Last Updated

18 Apr 2019

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Time Traveler for exorbitant

The first known use of exorbitant was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for exorbitant

exorbitant

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of exorbitant

: going far beyond what is fair, reasonable, or expected : too high, expensive, etc.

exorbitant

adjective
ex·​or·​bi·​tant | \ ig-ˈzȯr-bə-tənt How to pronounce exorbitant (audio) \

Kids Definition of exorbitant

: more than what is fair, reasonable, or expected exorbitant prices

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