depressive

adjective
de·​pres·​sive | \ di-ˈpre-siv How to pronounce depressive (audio) , dē- \

Definition of depressive

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : tending to depress
2 : of, relating to, marked by, or affected by psychological depression depressive symptoms a depressive patient

depressive

noun

Definition of depressive (Entry 2 of 2)

: one who is affected with or prone to psychological depression

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Other Words from depressive

Adjective

depressively adverb

Examples of depressive in a Sentence

Adjective the depressive air of a dingy barroom where locals went to drown their sorrows
Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective Both the short- and long-sleep duration groups reported more depressive symptoms than the normal sleep group. Kristen Rogers, CNN, 30 Aug. 2021 Many people cannot will themselves out of a depressive episode just to keep a man; her struggles seem to be rooted in a lot of past trauma from losing everything and having to rebuild, and COVID has augmented feelings of insecurity for everyone. Shamira Ibrahim, Vulture, 22 Aug. 2021 But, generally, stress of any kind can trigger manic and depressive symptoms in bipolar patients, according to the Cleveland Clinic. Melissa Matthew, SELF, 11 Aug. 2021 Typically, symptoms of a major depressive episode may include feeling sad, crying, having recurrent thoughts of death and losing interest in activities. New York Times, 19 July 2021 The medication has been prescribed for half a century to help stabilize patients’ moods and prevent manic or depressive episodes. Dina Fine Maron, Scientific American, 27 Feb. 2018 Such studies found that patients treated with drugs that suppress immune activity, like those that target the molecule IL-6, had reduced depressive symptoms. Claudia López Lloreda, STAT, 17 Aug. 2021 The authors measured depressive symptoms and educational attainment, too. Kristen Rogers, CNN, 16 Aug. 2021 The prevalence of depressive symptoms in the United States increased more than threefold as Covid-19 spread, according to a recent study in the journal JAMA. Dr. Mark Lieber, CNN, 16 July 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun In her first two novels, Conversations With Friends (2017) and Normal People (2018), the young Irish writer Sally Rooney resurrected the depressive, evacuated style that Ernest Hemingway made his signature. Caleb Crain, The Atlantic, 10 Aug. 2021 Writing about a listless depressive with seemingly no deep passions or excitements and no significant relationship with any other living being is the far greater challenge Lahiri has set herself. Sigrid Nunez, The New York Review of Books, 11 May 2021 Some people may experience psychotic symptoms (such as hearing voices) or experience suicidal thoughts due to the severity of their depressive or anxiety symptoms, Dr. Magavi says. Claire Gillespie, Health.com, 7 May 2021 The producer was a lifelong depressive whose last film had also flopped. Washington Post, 31 Mar. 2021 Aside from governing sleep, melatonin is linked to many other biological processes, like reproductive development, and may possibly underlie cancer and mental health disorders like major depressive or bipolar disorder. Miriam Fauzia, USA TODAY, 24 Nov. 2020 King’s characters are writers, doctors, teachers, bullied kids, depressives, alcoholics, people on low incomes. Washington Post, 8 Nov. 2019 Here, the motte: The acutely suicidal, the delusional, the manic-depressives, and other students with serious mental illnesses should be allowed to miss school to attend to symptoms that arise from their relative conditions. John Hirschauer, National Review, 24 July 2019 The Elvis, the Jesus, the Galileo of this monument was a fella named George Ellery Hale, a brilliant manic-depressive who built this dome and two telescopes, then invited the world – including Albert Einstein and Edwin Hubble — to come up to play. Chris Erskinecolumnist, Los Angeles Times, 15 July 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'depressive.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of depressive

Adjective

1620, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Noun

1937, in the meaning defined above

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Time Traveler for depressive

Time Traveler

The first known use of depressive was in 1620

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Dictionary Entries Near depressive

depression spring

depressive

depressor

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Statistics for depressive

Last Updated

23 Sep 2021

Cite this Entry

“Depressive.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/depressive. Accessed 24 Sep. 2021.

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More Definitions for depressive

depressive

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of depressive

: of or relating to the medical condition of depression

depressive

adjective
de·​pres·​sive | \ di-ˈpres-iv How to pronounce depressive (audio) \

Medical Definition of depressive

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : tending to depress
2 : of, relating to, marked by, or affected by psychological depression the patient was paranoid and depressive depressive symptoms

depressive

noun

Medical Definition of depressive (Entry 2 of 2)

: one who is affected with or prone to psychological depression

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