divine

adjective
di·​vine | \ də-ˈvīn How to pronounce divine (audio) \
diviner; divinest

Definition of divine

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1 religion
a : of, relating to, or proceeding directly from God (see god entry 1 sense 1) or a god (see god entry 1 sense 2) divine inspiration divine love praying for divine intervention
b : being a deity the divine Savior a divine ruler
c : directed to a deity divine worship
2a : supremely good : superb The meal was just divine.

divine

noun

Definition of divine (Entry 2 of 3)

1 religion : clergyman a Puritan divine
2 religion : theologian

divine

verb
divined; divining

Definition of divine (Entry 3 of 3)

transitive verb

1 : to discover by intuition or insight : infer divine the truth
2 : to discover or locate (something, such as underground water or minerals) usually by means of a divining rod

intransitive verb

1 : to seek to predict future events or discover hidden knowledge usually by the interpretation of omens or by the aid of supernatural powers : to practice divination : prophesy
2 : to perceive intuitively

Keep scrolling for more

Other Words from divine

Adjective

divinely adverb

Synonyms & Antonyms for divine

Synonyms: Adjective

Synonyms: Noun

Synonyms: Verb

Antonyms: Adjective

Antonyms: Noun

Visit the Thesaurus for More 

Choose the Right Synonym for divine

Verb

foresee, foreknow, divine, anticipate mean to know beforehand. foresee implies nothing about how the knowledge is derived and may apply to ordinary reasoning and experience. economists should have foreseen the recession foreknow usually implies supernatural assistance, as through revelation. if only we could foreknow our own destinies divine adds to foresee the suggestion of exceptional wisdom or discernment. was able to divine Europe's rapid recovery from the war anticipate implies taking action about or responding emotionally to something before it happens. the waiter anticipated our every need

Examples of divine in a Sentence

Adjective They prayed for divine intervention. how about a piece of the most divine apple pie I've ever tasted! Noun the great influence exerted by the Puritan divines in the Massachusetts Bay Colony Verb divine the answer to a question it was easy to divine his intention of asking his girlfriend to marry him
See More
Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective There is no divine manager up there managing your life. Jim Dobson, Forbes, "Modern Day Mystic Sadhguru On His Motorcycle Adventure Across America, And His New Book On Karma," 27 Apr. 2021 Playing an important role in rituals, ceremonial as well as practical, fragrance has long been perceived as divine, protective, and luxurious—but, above all, essential. Beatriz Zimmermann, Town & Country, "The Soothing Power of Scent," 27 Apr. 2021 Male competition, the divine mystery of creative brilliance, the fickleness of popularity: All play a part in Amadeus, although that shouldn’t discount how funny this film is, too. Tim Grierson, Vulture, "Every Oscar Best Picture Winner, Ranked," 26 Apr. 2021 Digital Underground were the divine mutant spawn of George Clinton, but bridged with the Bay Area traditions of the Merry Pranksters and the Black Panthers. Washington Post, "Shock G of Digital Underground was a psychedelic rap pioneer who helped hip-hop crossover," 24 Apr. 2021 For him, the divine fulfillment of connecting to nature is worth all the costs. Carlos Aguilar, Los Angeles Times, "The magic of Chloé Zhao: How the Oscars favorite gets brilliant performances from non-actors," 24 Apr. 2021 As a man of God, Ockham used this principle to defend the idea of divine miracles. Teddy Mcdarrah, Forbes, "We’ve Got It Simple: What Philosophy Teaches Us About Making Better Decisions," 19 Apr. 2021 The shamans believed there was a correlation between medicinal plants and divine spirits, a notion that didn’t sit well with the Spanish church. Zoe Wilder, Rolling Stone, "Does 4/20 Still Matter?," 19 Apr. 2021 To promote this vision of divine oneness and social equality, Guru Nanak created institutions and religious practices. Simran Jeet Singh, The Conversation, "Sikhs in America: A religious community long misunderstood is mourning deaths in Indianapolis mass shooting," 17 Apr. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Good Ol’ Dom is a representation of the divine, (G.O.D, in other words). Laird Borrelli-persson, Vogue, "Anatomyland Is a New Collection From Aitor Throup Exploring Themes of Inequality, Mental Health, and Higher Consciousness," 22 Apr. 2021 Much like the curanderos of the Seventeenth century, cannabis is being used across the world, once again, to mitigate symptoms of disease, pain, and illness while reconnecting users to the divine. Zoe Wilder, Rolling Stone, "Does 4/20 Still Matter?," 19 Apr. 2021 Cultivate your inner divine and your relationship with yourself. Olivia F. Scott, Essence, "What The Derrick Jaxn Fallout Means To Black Women Who Supported Him," 26 Mar. 2021 For 32-year-old executive director Taylor Toynes, the opportunity to set up shop in the former Moorland facility, with its significant historical roots, is nothing less than evidence of the divine. Sharon Grigsby, Dallas News, "Neighborhood-grown For Oak Cliff nonprofit acquires former YMCA with roots in historic Black Dallas," 23 Mar. 2021 Finding the divine in difficult moments was what inspired Yulia Kazakova to pursue becoming a chaplain. Jonathan D. Fitzgerald, BostonGlobe.com, "Chaplains and the rise of on-demand spiritual support," 9 Mar. 2021 This combination is typical of Casey’s style, in which the commonplace flows into a glistening divine. Washington Post, "In the galleries: A focus on the intersection of art and movement," 26 Feb. 2021 What Luhrmann describes, however, is a more fretful relationship with the divine. Anne Enright, The New York Review of Books, "Spirited Away," 23 Feb. 2021 The Bhagavad Gita says all paths lead toward the divine. Kevin Fisher-paulson, San Francisco Chronicle, "Embracing flaws in yoga class, anticipating Ash Wednesday," 16 Feb. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Townsend referenced the county’s high percentage of adjudicated votes, meaning a ballot review by a small panel to divine the voter’s intent. Cole Lauterbach, Washington Examiner, "Feuding Arizona GOP lawmakers stall election reform bill," 23 Apr. 2021 But Anheuser-Busch InBev and Goose Island were such an odd pairing — the world’s largest beer company and that scrappy Chicago visionary — that the greater meaning was hard to divine. Josh Noel, chicagotribune.com, "Goose Island sale 10 years later: Anheuser-Busch got what it needed from the deal, but what’s left for Chicago beer drinkers is more complicated.," 27 Mar. 2021 Every fashion season, designers try to divine consumer desire six months ahead of time then provide pieces that will fulfill it. Vogue Runway, Vogue, "Vogue’s Critics on Fall 2021—Runway Posturing Is Out, and Real-Life Comfort and Cool Are In," 15 Mar. 2021 If given infinite amounts of time, a high-level chess player could divine the best move—but most competitive chess formats restrict the players' time. Chazz Mair, Wired, "The Game of Chess Had Patch Notes, Too," 8 Mar. 2021 The goal is not to understand an issue, let alone divine the truth, but to broadcast what Democrats and Republicans care about at that moment. Alex Shephard, The New Republic, "The Sunday Shows Are Hopelessly Broken," 23 Feb. 2021 Hospitals and doctors preferred arbitration that would allow a supposedly neutral party to divine the proper price of the service. The Editorial Board, WSJ, "Surprise! A Health Lobby Cage Match," 30 Dec. 2020 For early clues to how COVID-19 might behave, health experts tried to divine the risk of reinfection by looking at other human coronaviruses. Sarah Elizabeth Richards, Science, "Already had the coronavirus? You could get it again.," 1 Dec. 2020 So now regulators will divine Congress’s unwritten intent amid frantic corporate lobbying for dispensations. The Editorial Board, WSJ, "Congress Punts on China Stocks," 15 Dec. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'divine.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of divine

Adjective

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for divine

Adjective

Middle English divin, from Anglo-French, from Latin divinus, from divus god — more at deity

Noun

Middle English, from Medieval Latin divinus, from Latin, soothsayer, from divinus, adjective — see divine entry 1

Verb

Middle English, from Anglo-French & Latin; Anglo-French deviner, from Latin divinare, from divinus, noun — see divine entry 1

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about divine

Time Traveler for divine

Time Traveler

The first known use of divine was in the 14th century

See more words from the same century

Statistics for divine

Last Updated

8 May 2021

Cite this Entry

“Divine.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/divine. Accessed 16 May. 2021.

Style: MLA
MLACheck Mark Icon ChicagoCheck Mark Icon APACheck Mark Icon Merriam-WebsterCheck Mark Icon

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for divine

divine

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of divine

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: relating to or coming from God or a god
informal + somewhat old-fashioned : very good

divine

verb

English Language Learners Definition of divine (Entry 2 of 2)

formal + literary : to discover or understand (something) without having direct evidence

divine

adjective
di·​vine | \ də-ˈvīn How to pronounce divine (audio) \

Kids Definition of divine

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : of or relating to God or a god divine will
2 : being in praise of God : religious, holy divine worship
3 : like a god The pharaohs of ancient Egypt were considered divine.
4 : very good

Other Words from divine

divinely adverb

divine

verb
divined; divining

Kids Definition of divine (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to discover or understand something by using intuition
2 : to foretell the future by using signs and omens or magic powers

Comments on divine

What made you want to look up divine? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

Test Your Vocabulary

Words Used by Nabokov Quiz

  • image1676440788
  • Choose the best definition or synonym for the word in bold: "There are some eructations that sound like cheers—at least, mine did." Lolita
Spell It

Can you spell these 10 commonly misspelled words?

TAKE THE QUIZ
Universal Daily Crossword

A daily challenge for crossword fanatics.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!