divine

adjective
di·​vine | \ də-ˈvīn How to pronounce divine (audio) \
diviner; divinest

Definition of divine

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1 religion
a : of, relating to, or proceeding directly from God (see god entry 1 sense 1) or a god (see god entry 1 sense 2) divine inspiration divine love praying for divine intervention
b : being a deity the divine Savior a divine ruler
c : directed to a deity divine worship
2a : supremely good : superb The meal was just divine.

divine

noun

Definition of divine (Entry 2 of 3)

1 religion : clergyman a Puritan divine
2 religion : theologian

divine

verb
divined; divining

Definition of divine (Entry 3 of 3)

transitive verb

1 : to discover by intuition or insight : infer divine the truth
2 : to discover or locate (something, such as underground water or minerals) usually by means of a divining rod

intransitive verb

1 : to seek to predict future events or discover hidden knowledge usually by the interpretation of omens or by the aid of supernatural powers : to practice divination : prophesy
2 : to perceive intuitively

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Other Words from divine

Adjective

divinely adverb

Synonyms & Antonyms for divine

Synonyms: Adjective

Synonyms: Noun

Synonyms: Verb

Antonyms: Adjective

Antonyms: Noun

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Choose the Right Synonym for divine

Verb

foresee, foreknow, divine, anticipate mean to know beforehand. foresee implies nothing about how the knowledge is derived and may apply to ordinary reasoning and experience. economists should have foreseen the recession foreknow usually implies supernatural assistance, as through revelation. if only we could foreknow our own destinies divine adds to foresee the suggestion of exceptional wisdom or discernment. was able to divine Europe's rapid recovery from the war anticipate implies taking action about or responding emotionally to something before it happens. the waiter anticipated our every need

Examples of divine in a Sentence

Adjective They prayed for divine intervention. how about a piece of the most divine apple pie I've ever tasted! Noun the great influence exerted by the Puritan divines in the Massachusetts Bay Colony Verb divine the answer to a question it was easy to divine his intention of asking his girlfriend to marry him
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective That includes absolutely divine meals, which are included for overnight guests of the resort. Stacey Leasca, Travel + Leisure, "This Castle Resort Outside New York City Is Reopening June 15," 14 May 2020 Many couples, though, don’t see the pandemic as some sort of divine intervention that saved them from a doomed wedding date, including Dan Dolan and Meera Kirpekar, 30 and 34. Molly Longman, refinery29.com, "Astrologer Susan Miller Tried To Warn Us About The 2020 Wedding Season," 13 May 2020 In that instant, with the congregants cheering her towards the altar, the Queen of Soul appears divine. Brooke Bobb, Vogue, "In Amazing Grace, Aretha Franklin Reminds Us That Fashion Can Be Divine," 10 Apr. 2019 On the walls of her Berlin apartment, Tara Reddi, an art dealer, has arranged a collection of ex votos, votive offerings customarily associated with divine intervention in calamities. New York Times, "The Year of Magical Thinking," 14 Apr. 2020 There’s no place like home, Libra, and no sign knows the comfort of emotional security, divine femininity, and family quite like yours this month. Colin Bedell, Cosmopolitan, "Your Horoscope for the Week of January 8," 7 Jan. 2018 The first divine being whose name it was forbidden to mention was the bear. Roberto Calasso, Harper's Magazine, "Becoming Human," 30 Mar. 2020 Lee Howdle, a wildlife and nature photographer, captured the divine-looking event last Friday at the Peak District National Park in Derbyshire, about 20 miles southeast of Manchester. Joshua Bote, USA TODAY, "Stunning 'angel in the sky' photo caused by rare weather event," 14 Feb. 2020 Barbara becomes obsessed with the divine—including, later, Wonder Woman’s own origins—and makes a Faustian bargain in order to become a demigod herself, the Cheetah. Eliana Dockterman, Time, "Everything We Know About Wonder Woman 1984," 9 Dec. 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun And religious students say the language shift is but a small window into the subtle ways their communities intertwine deaf culture with the divine to produce uncommon expressions of faith and activism. Washington Post, "At Gallaudet University, deaf culture and faith mix," 28 Dec. 2019 His titles notwithstanding, Coetzee offers no definitive proof that the trilogy does indeed narrate a visitation from the divine. William Deresiewicz, The Atlantic, "The Special Child," 17 May 2020 Their opposition stunned a nation that treats top royals as semi-divine and edicts related to them as sacrosanct. Randy Thanthong-knight, Bloomberg.com, "Thai Court Disbands Opposition Party, Boosting Army-Backed Ruler," 13 May 2020 On Friday, the 3rd Circuit Court of Appeals reversed a lower-court decision and ruled that opening prayers for legislative sessions are limited to guest chaplains who believe in God, or a divine or higher power. Fox News, "Pennsylvania House's policy banning atheists from opening prayer does not violate Constitution, court says," 27 Aug. 2019 There’s a certain sadness that comes with coming across the divine at a tender age. John Archibald | Jarchibald@al.com, al, "Restaurants Birmingham misses most," 14 Apr. 2020 Gilbert’s memoir focused on the aspects of pleasure in Italy, devotion in India and a balance between the worldly and the divine in Bali. Mary Cadden, USA TODAY, "Travel the world in spite of coronavirus by reading these 10 transporting travelogues," 20 Mar. 2020 For Western traditions, only the divine is preserved from decay; human achievement will always be marked by the inevitability of a fall. Washington Post, "What ruins can teach us about beauty and decay," 7 Feb. 2020 Over centuries, art made the divine — what’s potent and invisible — seem real. Brian T. Allen, National Review, "Yale Teaches World Art," 6 Feb. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Lynn Scurfield As an economist, I’m often asked during recessions to divine the path of the recovery that will follow. N. Gregory Mankiw, New York Times, "A Tale of Two Possible Recoveries," 11 Apr. 2020 Other times, the state just makes a mistake, too arbitrary and inscrutable for the average person to divine and correct. Libby Watson, The New Republic, "The Health Insurance Crisis at Our Doorstep," 31 Mar. 2020 This sophisticated but not at all complicated Brussels sprouts salad is pretty close to divine. Katie Workman, NBC News, "Sunday Suppers: This roast beef dinner with crispy Parmesan potatoes will make your mama proud," 11 Jan. 2020 In the weeks ahead, perhaps an originalist legal scholar or two will divine the Framers’ will to argue that such measures are unconstitutional, and perhaps Trump will direct the Justice Department to challenge them in federal court. Matt Ford, The New Republic, "Trumpworld Embraces the Death Wish Economy," 25 Mar. 2020 Researchers at Yale divined this particular dino secret by studying the atom arrangement of 75-million-year-old eggshells, revealing that dinosaurs actually had warmer blood than their surrounding environment. Daisy Hernandez, Popular Mechanics, "Were Dinosaurs Warm-Blooded? Ancient Eggshells Point to 'Yes'," 19 Feb. 2020 This leaves political junkies scouring the latest polls to divine what might happen Feb. 3, when Iowa Democrats meet to kick off their party’s 2020 presidential roller derby. Karl Rove, WSJ, "The Four-Way Race for Iowa," 16 Jan. 2020 This source divined that Jayme had been abducted, raped and left in a small pond or lake northeast or east of her home. Peter Passi / Forum News Service, Twin Cities, "Recently released records show random nature of Closs kidnapping made for tough case," 30 Dec. 2019 Yet this would do nothing towards the second goal: freeing central banks from having to divine the short-term trade-off between inflation and unemployment. The Economist, "Central banksHow to make economic policy fit for a world of low inflation," 10 Oct. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'divine.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of divine

Adjective

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for divine

Adjective

Middle English divin, from Anglo-French, from Latin divinus, from divus god — more at deity

Noun

Middle English, from Medieval Latin divinus, from Latin, soothsayer, from divinus, adjective — see divine entry 1

Verb

Middle English, from Anglo-French & Latin; Anglo-French deviner, from Latin divinare, from divinus, noun — see divine entry 1

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Time Traveler for divine

Time Traveler

The first known use of divine was in the 14th century

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Statistics for divine

Last Updated

19 May 2020

Cite this Entry

“Divine.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/divine. Accessed 4 Jun. 2020.

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More Definitions for divine

divine

adjective
How to pronounce divine (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of divine

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: relating to or coming from God or a god
informal + somewhat old-fashioned : very good

divine

verb

English Language Learners Definition of divine (Entry 2 of 2)

formal + literary : to discover or understand (something) without having direct evidence

divine

adjective
di·​vine | \ də-ˈvīn How to pronounce divine (audio) \

Kids Definition of divine

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : of or relating to God or a god divine will
2 : being in praise of God : religious, holy divine worship
3 : like a god The pharaohs of ancient Egypt were considered divine.
4 : very good

Other Words from divine

divinely adverb

divine

verb
divined; divining

Kids Definition of divine (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to discover or understand something by using intuition
2 : to foretell the future by using signs and omens or magic powers

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Comments on divine

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