deliberate

verb
de·​lib·​er·​ate | \ di-ˈli-bə-ˌrāt How to pronounce deliberate (audio) \
deliberated; deliberating

Definition of deliberate

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to think about or discuss issues and decisions carefully The jury deliberated for several days before reaching a verdict.

transitive verb

: to think about deliberately and often with formal discussion before reaching a decision deliberate the question was deliberating whether or not to accept the offer

deliberate

adjective
de·​lib·​er·​ate | \ di-ˈli-bə-rət How to pronounce deliberate (audio) , -ˈlib-rət \

Definition of deliberate (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : characterized by or resulting from careful and thorough consideration a deliberate decision Ms. Barker herself has said that the decision to write about the war was a deliberate response to patronizing reviews of her working-class settings …— Claudia Roth Pierpont
2 : characterized by awareness of the consequences a deliberate exaggeration a deliberate act of protest
3 : slow, unhurried, and steady as though allowing time for decision on each individual action involved The jeweler worked at a deliberate pace.

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Other Words from deliberate

Adjective

deliberateness noun

Choose the Right Synonym for deliberate

Verb

think, cogitate, reflect, reason, speculate, deliberate mean to use one's powers of conception, judgment, or inference. think is general and may apply to any mental activity, but used alone often suggests attainment of clear ideas or conclusions. teaches students how to think cogitate implies deep or intent thinking. cogitated on the mysteries of nature reflect suggests unhurried consideration of something recalled to the mind. reflecting on fifty years of married life reason stresses consecutive logical thinking. able to reason brilliantly in debate speculate implies reasoning about things theoretical or problematic. speculated on the fate of the lost explorers deliberate suggests slow or careful reasoning before forming an opinion or reaching a conclusion or decision. the jury deliberated for five hours

Adjective

voluntary, intentional, deliberate, willing mean done or brought about of one's own will. voluntary implies freedom and spontaneity of choice or action without external compulsion. a voluntary confession intentional stresses an awareness of an end to be achieved. the intentional concealment of vital information deliberate implies full consciousness of the nature of one's act and its consequences. deliberate acts of sabotage willing implies a readiness and eagerness to accede to or anticipate the wishes of another. willing obedience

Examples of deliberate in a Sentence

Verb The jury deliberated for two days before reaching a verdict. They will deliberate the question. Adjective She spoke in a clear, deliberate manner. He advocates a slow and deliberate approach to the problem.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb California still figuring it out: A California vaccine advisory committee on Wednesday met to deliberate who among the state’s 11 million essential workers should get priority for coronavirus vaccines after health care workers and nursing homes. Chronicle Staff, SFChronicle.com, "Coronavirus news from the Bay Area: Dec. 10-16," 26 Dec. 2020 In December 2016, Fortune and our then-sister publication, Time, took 100 CEOs from the world’s largest companies to Rome, to deliberate on things the private sector could do to address global social problems. David Meyer, Fortune, "Towards a capitalism that better serves society," 8 Dec. 2020 During the current pandemic, the panel's working group has met weekly to deliberate on the various options. Elizabeth Cohen, CNN, "CDC's team of advisers set to decide who gets coronavirus vaccine first," 1 Dec. 2020 Since 2006, thanks to deliberate Obama administration policies, natural gas production has risen in the U.S., making the country one of the largest gas exporters in the world. Edna Bonhomme, The New Republic, "The Global Temptation to Keep Building Pipelines," 2 Dec. 2020 Who has freedom of opinion and the ability to express and deliberate in the modern public forums? Michael Brendan Dougherty, National Review, "The Right to Be Wrong," 2 Dec. 2020 Crude oil slipped as OPEC continues to deliberate extending output cuts, with Brent settling at less than $48/barrel. Rey Mashayekhi, Fortune, "A morose Monday can’t mess up the markets’ magnificent November," 1 Dec. 2020 The judge gave the panel instruction stressing the importance of reaching verdicts and gave them more time to deliberate. Tracy Neal, Arkansas Online, "Drug, gun offenses net 58 year prison sentence for Louisiana man," 23 Oct. 2020 The agency could take days to deliberate on whether to authorize the vaccine, FDA Commissioner Dr. Stephen Hahn said in an interview with USA Today published Tuesday. Rebecca Robbins, Star Tribune, "First 6.4 million doses of Pfizer vaccine will be split among states, territories," 24 Nov. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective Higher undergraduate debt is also often the result of a deliberate choice to attend expensive private colleges rather than more affordable public ones, and to turn down avenues such as military service that can pay for college. The Editors, National Review, "Don’t Forgive Student Debt," 19 Nov. 2020 And that requires a deliberate effort to expose your children to different viewpoints and perspectives. Rachel Ng, Family, "How do we build tolerance after the election’s discord? Start with kids.," 16 Nov. 2020 The flight-readiness review for tonight’s launch, held earlier this week, unfolded quite differently—a deliberate effort to avoid the mistakes of the past. Marina Koren, The Atlantic, "SpaceX’s Riskiest Business," 15 Nov. 2020 Second, and importantly, came Vandalism: the deliberate destruction of culture. James Robins, The New Republic, "The Case for Calling Climate Change “Genocide”," 23 Sep. 2020 And Trump and his allies repeatedly mispronounce Harris' first name, a pattern her supporters say amounts to a deliberate effort to portray the daughter of immigrants as someone who does not belong at the top ranks of politics. Kathleen Ronayne And Jonathan Lemire, Star Tribune, "Trump, struggling to define Biden, steps up Harris attacks," 10 Sep. 2020 There had been a thread of hope after all and even now to this fatherless daughter, that deliberate destruction manifested a loneliness and despair that cut deep. Robin Antalek, Longreads, "The Bigamist’s Daughter," 22 Apr. 2020 The process was financially and emotionally stressful, but the way Coleman describes her participation reframes a reaction to misfortune as a deliberate act. Jen Schwartz, Scientific American, "Surrendering to Rising Seas," 1 Aug. 2018 This is not a land of anti-vaxxers and conspiracy theorists, but a country where the public is often deliberate and careful, especially about foreign drugs. Washington Post, "Japan had ordered enough vaccines for the whole country. Now it has to overcome a history of vaccine mistrust.," 18 Dec. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'deliberate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of deliberate

Verb

1536y, in the meaning defined at transitive sense

Adjective

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for deliberate

Adjective and Verb

Middle English, from Latin deliberatus, past participle of deliberare to consider carefully, perhaps alteration of *delibrare, from de- + libra scale, pound

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Time Traveler for deliberate

Time Traveler

The first known use of deliberate was in the 15th century

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Statistics for deliberate

Last Updated

11 Jan 2021

Cite this Entry

“Deliberate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/deliberate. Accessed 19 Jan. 2021.

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More Definitions for deliberate

deliberate

verb
How to pronounce deliberate (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of deliberate

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to think about or discuss something very carefully in order to make a decision

deliberate

adjective
How to pronounce deliberate (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of deliberate (Entry 2 of 2)

: done or said in a way that is planned or intended : done or said on purpose
: done or decided after careful thought
: slow and careful

deliberate

verb
de·​lib·​er·​ate | \ di-ˈli-bə-ˌrāt How to pronounce deliberate (audio) \
deliberated; deliberating

Kids Definition of deliberate

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to think about carefully

deliberate

adjective
de·​lib·​er·​ate | \ di-ˈli-bə-rət How to pronounce deliberate (audio) , -ˈli-brət \

Kids Definition of deliberate (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : showing careful thought a deliberate decision
2 : done or said on purpose a deliberate lie
3 : slow in action : not hurried a deliberate pace

Other Words from deliberate

deliberately adverb She deliberately lied!

deliberate

verb
de·​lib·​er·​ate | \ di-ˈli-bə-ˌrāt How to pronounce deliberate (audio) \
deliberated; deliberating

Legal Definition of deliberate

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to think about and weigh or discuss issues and decisions carefully the jury retired to deliberate

transitive verb

: to think about or evaluate

deliberate

adjective
de·​lib·​er·​ate | \ di-ˈli-bə-rət How to pronounce deliberate (audio) \

Legal Definition of deliberate (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : characterized by or resulting from careful consideration especially : characterized by or resulting from evaluation done in a cool state of blood and with a fixed purpose deliberate murder — compare premeditated
2 : characterized by an understanding of the nature of a thing or act and its consequences deliberate falsehoods

Other Words from deliberate

deliberately adverb
deliberateness noun

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Comments on deliberate

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