deliberate

verb
de·​lib·​er·​ate | \ di-ˈli-bə-ˌrāt How to pronounce deliberate (audio) \
deliberated; deliberating

Definition of deliberate

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to think about or discuss issues and decisions carefully The jury deliberated for several days before reaching a verdict.

transitive verb

: to think about deliberately and often with formal discussion before reaching a decision deliberate the question was deliberating whether or not to accept the offer

deliberate

adjective
de·​lib·​er·​ate | \ di-ˈli-bə-rət How to pronounce deliberate (audio) , -ˈlib-rət \

Definition of deliberate (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : characterized by or resulting from careful and thorough consideration a deliberate decision Ms. Barker herself has said that the decision to write about the war was a deliberate response to patronizing reviews of her working-class settings …— Claudia Roth Pierpont
2 : characterized by awareness of the consequences a deliberate exaggeration a deliberate act of protest
3 : slow, unhurried, and steady as though allowing time for decision on each individual action involved The jeweler worked at a deliberate pace.

Keep scrolling for more

Other Words from deliberate

Adjective

deliberateness noun

Choose the Right Synonym for deliberate

Verb

think, cogitate, reflect, reason, speculate, deliberate mean to use one's powers of conception, judgment, or inference. think is general and may apply to any mental activity, but used alone often suggests attainment of clear ideas or conclusions. teaches students how to think cogitate implies deep or intent thinking. cogitated on the mysteries of nature reflect suggests unhurried consideration of something recalled to the mind. reflecting on fifty years of married life reason stresses consecutive logical thinking. able to reason brilliantly in debate speculate implies reasoning about things theoretical or problematic. speculated on the fate of the lost explorers deliberate suggests slow or careful reasoning before forming an opinion or reaching a conclusion or decision. the jury deliberated for five hours

Adjective

voluntary, intentional, deliberate, willing mean done or brought about of one's own will. voluntary implies freedom and spontaneity of choice or action without external compulsion. a voluntary confession intentional stresses an awareness of an end to be achieved. the intentional concealment of vital information deliberate implies full consciousness of the nature of one's act and its consequences. deliberate acts of sabotage willing implies a readiness and eagerness to accede to or anticipate the wishes of another. willing obedience

Examples of deliberate in a Sentence

Verb The jury deliberated for two days before reaching a verdict. They will deliberate the question. Adjective She spoke in a clear, deliberate manner. He advocates a slow and deliberate approach to the problem.
See More
Recent Examples on the Web: Verb In a special meeting Friday evening, the Anchorage Assembly will deliberate over which member will serve as acting mayor when Mayor Ethan Berkowitz’s resignation takes effect at 6 p.m. Anchorage Daily News, "Watch live: Anchorage Assembly members convene to discuss who may become acting mayor," 17 Oct. 2020 At 11:30, the jury walked out to deliberate, and the tenants found an open space in the courtroom complex to await the verdict. Matthew Desmond, New York Times, "The Tenants Who Evicted Their Landlord," 13 Oct. 2020 The Open Meetings Act requires public bodies to deliberate and take official actions only in a public meeting unless stated otherwise. Segann March, The Enquirer, "Cleves Village Council facing lawsuit for alleged Open Meetings Act violation," 6 Oct. 2020 The commission will meet again Tuesday to choose which defendants to name, and deliberate further on legal representation. Vivian Jones, Washington Examiner, "Davidson County Election Commission punts decision on 34% property tax increase repeal to judge," 28 Sep. 2020 With the weeklong trial complete, the jury was excused to deliberate and decide Todd Mullis's fate. Jim Axelrod, CBS News, "A woman is impaled by a corn rake – but do her fatal injuries add up to murder?," 26 Sep. 2020 The southeastern state of Victoria recorded 14 new cases and eight deaths, as officials deliberate over whether to open up the state capital, Melbourne, on Sunday. Adam Martin, WSJ, "U.S. Coronavirus Cases Near Seven Million," 25 Sep. 2020 By its very definition, the job of a deliberative body is to deliberate, not to be a rubber stamp or a slave to process. Michael Ryan, Star Tribune, "It's the GOP Senate's right and duty to replace Ginsburg," 22 Sep. 2020 In other cases, evidence points to deliberate efforts to suppress informal languages. John Wenz, TheWeek, "The fragile state of contact languages," 20 Sep. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective The approach is deliberate, Green believes, and sometimes effective. Sam Adler-bell, The New Republic, "How Police Unions Bully Politicians," 20 Oct. 2020 Be deliberate in making time to care for yourself by engaging in activities that bring you joy. Melissa Burdi, The Conversation, "7 tips for staying safe as COVID-19 cases rise and colder weather heightens the risk," 19 Oct. 2020 The commitment to versatility, variety, rigor, and depth was deliberate, gleaned from years of observation. Soraya Nadia Mcdonald, Glamour, "Regina King—Long May She Reign," 13 Oct. 2020 But with the pandemic, the shift to online coaching has been more deliberate—which comes with pros and cons—and has brought about some changes to their businesses. Quartz Staff, Quartz, "How consulting is trying to stay essential during Covid-19," 13 Oct. 2020 But with the pandemic, the shift to online coaching has been more deliberate—which comes with pros and cons—and has brought about some changes to their businesses. Michelle Cheng, Quartz at Work, "How 6 executive coaches (and their clients) are handling the pandemic," 11 Oct. 2020 American Express has been more deliberate about reopening its own lounges, which has been a loss for those road warriors still traveling. Edward Pizzarello, CNN Underscored, "American Express announces first Centurion Lounge reopening date," 16 Sep. 2020 If quiet kids are overwhelmed by the prospect of school without reprieve as the lines between home and learning blur, parents will need to be even more deliberate about meeting their needs for downtime. Christine Bader, Washington Post, "How parents can help shy and introverted kids through a particularly tough back-to-school season," 17 Aug. 2020 The consensus on deliberate overshooting already shows signs of cracking. Peter Coy, Bloomberg.com, "The Most Dovish Fed in History Is on a Mission to Spur Inflation," 8 Oct. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'deliberate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of deliberate

Verb

1536y, in the meaning defined at transitive sense

Adjective

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for deliberate

Adjective and Verb

Middle English, from Latin deliberatus, past participle of deliberare to consider carefully, perhaps alteration of *delibrare, from de- + libra scale, pound

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about deliberate

Time Traveler for deliberate

Time Traveler

The first known use of deliberate was in the 15th century

See more words from the same century

Statistics for deliberate

Last Updated

25 Oct 2020

Cite this Entry

“Deliberate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/deliberate. Accessed 30 Oct. 2020.

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for deliberate

deliberate

verb
How to pronounce deliberate (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of deliberate

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to think about or discuss something very carefully in order to make a decision

deliberate

adjective
How to pronounce deliberate (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of deliberate (Entry 2 of 2)

: done or said in a way that is planned or intended : done or said on purpose
: done or decided after careful thought
: slow and careful

deliberate

verb
de·​lib·​er·​ate | \ di-ˈli-bə-ˌrāt How to pronounce deliberate (audio) \
deliberated; deliberating

Kids Definition of deliberate

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to think about carefully

deliberate

adjective
de·​lib·​er·​ate | \ di-ˈli-bə-rət How to pronounce deliberate (audio) , -ˈli-brət \

Kids Definition of deliberate (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : showing careful thought a deliberate decision
2 : done or said on purpose a deliberate lie
3 : slow in action : not hurried a deliberate pace

Other Words from deliberate

deliberately adverb She deliberately lied!

deliberate

verb
de·​lib·​er·​ate | \ di-ˈli-bə-ˌrāt How to pronounce deliberate (audio) \
deliberated; deliberating

Legal Definition of deliberate

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to think about and weigh or discuss issues and decisions carefully the jury retired to deliberate

transitive verb

: to think about or evaluate

deliberate

adjective
de·​lib·​er·​ate | \ di-ˈli-bə-rət How to pronounce deliberate (audio) \

Legal Definition of deliberate (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : characterized by or resulting from careful consideration especially : characterized by or resulting from evaluation done in a cool state of blood and with a fixed purpose deliberate murder — compare premeditated
2 : characterized by an understanding of the nature of a thing or act and its consequences deliberate falsehoods

Other Words from deliberate

deliberately adverb
deliberateness noun

Keep scrolling for more

Comments on deliberate

What made you want to look up deliberate? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

Test Your Vocabulary

Here Be Dragons: A Creature Identification Quiz

  • monster werewolf photo
  • Which is a synonym of werewolf?
Spell It

Can you spell these 10 commonly misspelled words?

TAKE THE QUIZ
Syn City

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!