cram

verb
\ ˈkram How to pronounce cram (audio) \
crammed; cramming

Definition of cram

 (Entry 1 of 4)

transitive verb

1 : to pack tight : jam cram a suitcase with clothes a novel crammed with surprises
2a : to fill with food to satiety : stuff
b : to eat voraciously : bolt the child crams her food
3 : to thrust in or as if in a rough or forceful manner crammed the letters into his pocket
4 : to prepare hastily for an examination cram the students for the test

intransitive verb

1 : to eat greedily or to satiety : stuff
2 : to study a subject intensively especially for an imminent examination

cram

noun

Definition of cram (Entry 2 of 4)

1 : a compressed multitude or crowd : crush
2 : last-minute study especially for an examination

Cram

biographical name (1)
\ ˈkram How to pronounce Cram (audio) \

Definition of Cram (Entry 3 of 4)

Donald James 1919–2001 American chemist

Cram

biographical name (2)

Definition of Cram (Entry 4 of 4)

Ralph Adams 1863–1942 American architect and author

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Other Words from cram

Verb

crammer noun

Synonyms for cram

Synonyms: Verb

crowd, crush, jam, ram, sandwich, shoehorn, squeeze, stuff, wedge

Synonyms: Noun

army, bike [chiefly Scottish], crowd, crush, drove, flock, herd, horde, host, legion, mass, mob, multitude, press, rout, scrum, swarm, throng

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Examples of cram in a Sentence

Verb

He crammed the suitcase with his clothes. Before the trip I crammed my head with information about Spain.

Noun

battling the rush-hour cram in the subway
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Outside the hearing, hundreds of supporters and opponents crammed into the hallway. Dustin Gardiner, SFChronicle.com, "Gig-work bill passes Senate committee as crowds rally for and against it," 10 July 2019 So now the entire library is crammed into one room of the center. , Cincinnati Enquirer, Cincinnati.com, "What do city kids do in the summer? Thrive, thanks to the rec center next door," 26 June 2019 At least twice as many reporters and photographers compared to previous news conferences crammed into an auditorium at Stade de Lyon the day before Sunday’s World Cup final between the United States and Netherlands. Alicia Delgallo, Pro Soccer USA, "Megan Rapinoe remains candid, unfiltered day before World Cup final," 22 Aug. 2018 Today, its narrow seaside road is crammed with more than a hundred hotels and restaurants. Andreane Williams, USA TODAY, "Landfills, polluted drinking water: This tiny town in Mexico is hurting the environment," 4 Apr. 2018 However, that plan came at the same time as populations within the aging facility saw pregnant women sleeping on floors and inmates crammed in crowded pods for up to 23 hours a day. Adam Ferrise, cleveland.com, "Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine makes wholesale changes to state jail inspections, citing ‘crisis’ at Cuyahoga County Jail," 6 June 2019 Nearby, rows of vehicles awaiting export were crammed together along a dirt strip separating the street from the shipyard, where a stately blue cargo vessel was being loaded with goods. Rowan Moore Gerety, Harper's magazine, "Downstream," 10 June 2019 Blood Donations Slacken Following D-Day Spurt For the first two days after the invasion, Detroiters crammed the Red Cross Blood Bank at 450 W. Fort, but Thursday there was a gradual decline in donors, plasma officials said. Ann Zaniewski, Detroit Free Press, "What the Free Press front page looked like as D-Day unfolded," 5 June 2019 East Passyunk Avenue’s Tildie’s Toy Box will cram one pod with more than 600 gender-neutral toys, games, books, and crafting materials. Grace Dickinson, https://www.inquirer.com, "The Piazza Pod Park opens in Northern Liberties on Saturday. Here’s what to expect," 4 June 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

His experience last season was akin to a months-long cram session. Luke Johnson, nola.com, "Teddy Bridgewater saw potential for growth in New Orleans, so he stayed," 24 June 2019 Getting off a plane to go play football for three hours after a week-long cram session of film study, workouts and practice seems downright draining. Akeem Glaspie, Indianapolis Star, "Colts have one of the lightest travel schedules in the NFL. Will it matter? Probably not.," 11 June 2019 Until then, its cram time, which will extend through his summer break, before training camp begins, as Gesicki plans to use his father as his dry-erase board partner. Omar Kelly, Sun-Sentinel.com, "Dolphins rookie tight ends Mike Gesicki, Durham Smythe cramming to play catch up," 11 June 2018 More than seven million commuters a day cram onto the city’s existing creaky suburban railway network. Corinne Abrams, WSJ, "‘You Have to Actually Cut Open Mumbai’s Belly’—Inside One of the World’s Most Audacious Transit Projects," 6 Jan. 2019 Henna tattoo designs for brides, village cooking, spiritual gurus and Indian engineering-school entrance-exam cram courses are new genres that are thriving. Eric Bellman, WSJ, "Indians Are Binge-Watching Mobile Videos, Pushing YouTube, Others to Innovate," 21 Jan. 2019 The process might seem like a no-brainer — pack, transport, cram — but insiders say otherwise. Griffin Jackson, chicagotribune.com, "Self-storage is booming in big cities. 8 tips for doing it right.," 13 Sep. 2017 Gesicki and Smythe need the nightly cram sessions to digest Miami’s playbook. Omar Kelly, Sun-Sentinel.com, "Dolphins rookie tight ends Mike Gesicki, Durham Smythe cramming to play catch up," 11 June 2018 Those cram sessions are coming in the next few days for Nance, Clarkson, Osman and Zizic. Chris Fedor, cleveland.com, "How Larry Nance Jr. and Jordan Clarkson are approaching their first postseason appearance," 12 Apr. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cram.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of cram

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Noun

1810, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for cram

Verb

Middle English crammen, from Old English crammian; akin to Old Norse kremja to squeeze

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Learn More about cram

Dictionary Entries near cram

crake

crakeberry

crakow

cram

Cram

cramasie

Crambe

Statistics for cram

Last Updated

13 Jul 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for cram

The first known use of cram was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for cram

cram

verb

English Language Learners Definition of cram

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to fill (something) so that there is no room for anything else : to fill (something) completely
: to push or force (someone or something) into a space that is tight or crowded
: to push or force yourself into a space that is tight or crowded

cram

noun

English Language Learners Definition of cram (Entry 2 of 2)

US : a quick period of study in order to learn a lot of information quickly for a test, exam, etc.

cram

verb
\ ˈkram How to pronounce cram (audio) \
crammed; cramming

Kids Definition of cram

1 : to stuff or pack tightly … oh, the joy of being able to cram large pieces of something sweet … into one's mouth!— Roald Dahl, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory
2 : to fill full I crammed my suitcase with clothes.
3 : to study hard just before a test

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More from Merriam-Webster on cram

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with cram

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for cram

Spanish Central: Translation of cram

Nglish: Translation of cram for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of cram for Arabic Speakers

Comments on cram

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