cram

verb
\ ˈkram How to pronounce cram (audio) \
crammed; cramming

Definition of cram

 (Entry 1 of 4)

transitive verb

1 : to pack tight : jam cram a suitcase with clothes a novel crammed with surprises
2a : to fill with food to satiety : stuff
b : to eat voraciously : bolt the child crams her food
3 : to thrust in or as if in a rough or forceful manner crammed the letters into his pocket
4 : to prepare hastily for an examination cram the students for the test

intransitive verb

1 : to eat greedily or to satiety : stuff
2 : to study a subject intensively especially for an imminent examination

cram

noun

Definition of cram (Entry 2 of 4)

1 : a compressed multitude or crowd : crush
2 : last-minute study especially for an examination

Cram

biographical name (1)
\ ˈkram How to pronounce Cram (audio) \

Definition of Cram (Entry 3 of 4)

Donald James 1919–2001 American chemist

Cram

biographical name (2)

Definition of Cram (Entry 4 of 4)

Ralph Adams 1863–1942 American architect and author

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Other Words from cram

Verb

crammer noun

Synonyms for cram

Synonyms: Verb

crowd, crush, jam, ram, sandwich, shoehorn, squeeze, stuff, wedge

Synonyms: Noun

army, bike [chiefly Scottish], crowd, crush, drove, flock, herd, horde, host, legion, mass, mob, multitude, press, rout, scrum, swarm, throng

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Examples of cram in a Sentence

Verb

He crammed the suitcase with his clothes. Before the trip I crammed my head with information about Spain.

Noun

battling the rush-hour cram in the subway
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Determined not to fall short of their peers, the girls try to cram four years of fun into one night. Houston Chronicle, "Outside the Megaplex: Here are the Houston arthouse movies showing Sept. 13-19," 12 Sep. 2019 Some crammed onto buses, while others were picked up by drivers who had volunteered to help with the exodus. Austin Ramzy, BostonGlobe.com, "Hong Kong official says ‘elements of terror’ pervade antigovernment protests," 2 Sep. 2019 The man with the club got off three decisive swings, connecting meatily with the young man’s limbs and torso as the young man flailed backward off the sofa and tried to cram his entire stringy body in under a tabletop. Colin Barrett, Harper's magazine, "The Alps," 22 July 2019 Trying to cram your cutest outfits into your suitcase. Nicole Saporita, Good Housekeeping, "14 Genius Packing Tips to Help You Travel Like a Pro," 9 Apr. 2019 Two strangers hook up and, while giddily enjoying their postcoital high, decide to try to cram an entire relationship — a world of togetherness — into the next 24 hours. Manohla Dargis, New York Times, "Review: ‘Duck Butter’ and the 24-Hour ‘for Real’ Relationship," 26 Apr. 2018 Holding court While regular people crammed into beds, royalty often slept alone or with their spouse. Brian Fagan, The Conversation, "The bizarre social history of beds," 13 Sep. 2019 The sisters have two rooms, but everyone can be found crammed into one. Brooke Baitinger, sun-sentinel.com, "Bahamian evacuees in Florida weigh tough choices and uncertain futures," 12 Sep. 2019 That is why the firm elected not to build the Taycan, its brand-new all-electric model, at a spacious fresh site but instead cram production into a plot at its headquarters in Stuttgart, hemmed in on all sides by suburban housing. The Economist, "Porsche is small but highly lucrative," 12 Sep. 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Attendees and performers pre-gamed the fest with online cram sessions into each other’s SoundCloud pages and Instagram accounts. Michael Andor Brodeur, BostonGlobe.com, "At this campout, a digital community connected over disconnecting in the woods," 22 Aug. 2019 Hawkers, hackers, and pickpockets hunting for iPhones all cram onto the pedestrian sky bridge that spans Zhongguancun Road. Matt Sheehan, WIRED, "WFH: Chinese Engineers Abroad Come Back," 13 Aug. 2019 The Flip 4 boasts 12 hours of high-quality audio, which should be enough to last through any party or all-night cram session. Julianne Ross, CNN Underscored, "Pick up a sleek Bluetooth speaker to blast tunes in your dorm room," 24 July 2019 His experience last season was akin to a months-long cram session. Luke Johnson, nola.com, "Teddy Bridgewater saw potential for growth in New Orleans, so he stayed," 24 June 2019 Getting off a plane to go play football for three hours after a week-long cram session of film study, workouts and practice seems downright draining. Akeem Glaspie, Indianapolis Star, "Colts have one of the lightest travel schedules in the NFL. Will it matter? Probably not.," 11 June 2019 Until then, its cram time, which will extend through his summer break, before training camp begins, as Gesicki plans to use his father as his dry-erase board partner. Omar Kelly, Sun-Sentinel.com, "Dolphins rookie tight ends Mike Gesicki, Durham Smythe cramming to play catch up," 11 June 2018 More than seven million commuters a day cram onto the city’s existing creaky suburban railway network. Corinne Abrams, WSJ, "‘You Have to Actually Cut Open Mumbai’s Belly’—Inside One of the World’s Most Audacious Transit Projects," 6 Jan. 2019 Henna tattoo designs for brides, village cooking, spiritual gurus and Indian engineering-school entrance-exam cram courses are new genres that are thriving. Eric Bellman, WSJ, "Indians Are Binge-Watching Mobile Videos, Pushing YouTube, Others to Innovate," 21 Jan. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cram.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of cram

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Noun

1810, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for cram

Verb

Middle English crammen, from Old English crammian; akin to Old Norse kremja to squeeze

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Learn More about cram

Dictionary Entries near cram

crake

crakeberry

crakow

cram

Cram

cramasie

crambe

Statistics for cram

Last Updated

19 Oct 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for cram

The first known use of cram was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for cram

cram

verb

English Language Learners Definition of cram

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to fill (something) so that there is no room for anything else : to fill (something) completely
: to push or force (someone or something) into a space that is tight or crowded
: to push or force yourself into a space that is tight or crowded

cram

noun

English Language Learners Definition of cram (Entry 2 of 2)

US : a quick period of study in order to learn a lot of information quickly for a test, exam, etc.

cram

verb
\ ˈkram How to pronounce cram (audio) \
crammed; cramming

Kids Definition of cram

1 : to stuff or pack tightly … oh, the joy of being able to cram large pieces of something sweet … into one's mouth!— Roald Dahl, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory
2 : to fill full I crammed my suitcase with clothes.
3 : to study hard just before a test

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More from Merriam-Webster on cram

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with cram

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for cram

Spanish Central: Translation of cram

Nglish: Translation of cram for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of cram for Arabic Speakers

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