cram

verb
\ ˈkram \
crammed; cramming

Definition of cram

 (Entry 1 of 4)

transitive verb

1 : to pack tight : jam cram a suitcase with clothes a novel crammed with surprises
2a : to fill with food to satiety : stuff
b : to eat voraciously : bolt the child crams her food
3 : to thrust in or as if in a rough or forceful manner crammed the letters into his pocket
4 : to prepare hastily for an examination cram the students for the test

intransitive verb

1 : to eat greedily or to satiety : stuff
2 : to study a subject intensively especially for an imminent examination

cram

noun

Definition of cram (Entry 2 of 4)

1 : a compressed multitude or crowd : crush
2 : last-minute study especially for an examination

Cram

biographical name (1)
\ ˈkram \

Definition of Cram (Entry 3 of 4)

Donald James 1919–2001 American chemist

Cram

biographical name (2)

Definition of Cram (Entry 4 of 4)

Ralph Adams 1863–1942 American architect and author

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Other Words from cram

Verb

crammer noun

Synonyms for cram

Synonyms: Verb

crowd, crush, jam, ram, sandwich, shoehorn, squeeze, stuff, wedge

Synonyms: Noun

army, bike [chiefly Scottish], crowd, crush, drove, flock, herd, horde, host, legion, mass, mob, multitude, press, rout, scrum, swarm, throng

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Examples of cram in a Sentence

Verb

He crammed the suitcase with his clothes. Before the trip I crammed my head with information about Spain.

Noun

battling the rush-hour cram in the subway
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Hyundai has crammed the Nexo with the latest and greatest advanced driver assists, including a remote parking tool that appears to work well enough to be useful. Jonathan M. Gitlin, Ars Technica, "The 2019 Hyundai Nexo is an upmarket hydrogen fuel-cell SUV," 26 Oct. 2018 In May 2001, Discover’s cover story asked exactly that, exploring unanswered questions about the psychological perils of humans crammed together and flung through space. Stephen Ornes, Discover Magazine, "Want to be a Mars Astronaut? You'll Need the Proper Mindset," 16 Oct. 2018 That’s all crammed into about two hours, and the whiplash is considerable. Alissa Wilkinson, Vox, "In Fahrenheit 11/9, Michael Moore spares no one — especially self-satisfied liberals," 7 Sep. 2018 In the dark after-work hours, its tiny bars, ramen counters, karaoke boxes, and hostess spots were crammed with salarymen spending an extra few hours laughing at their superiors’ jokes or drinking off the stress of their jobs. Andrew Liptak, The Verge, "Two unlikely cops are paired up to solve murders in a war-torn Tokyo in Ninth Step Station," 8 Dec. 2018 The morgue in the state capital of Guadalajara, Mexico’s second-largest city, was crammed with unclaimed bodies that, under the new law, couldn’t be buried. Juan Montes, WSJ, "‘It’s a Crisis of Civilization in Mexico.’ 250,000 Dead. 37,400 Missing.," 14 Nov. 2018 More than 100,000 mostly ethnic Karen refugees from Burma - many Christians among them - are crammed into nine camps set out in isolated, misty hills of jungle terrian inside the border of Thailand. Hollie Mckay, Fox News, "Burma's Karen refugees face dwindling aid, struggle with depression and suicides," 15 Aug. 2018 For next season, 46 tournaments will be crammed into 41 weeks. Doug Ferguson, OrlandoSentinel.com, "Ferguson: PGA Championship move to May crucial to Tour's schedule tweaks," 11 July 2018 Many of the animals, some of which are in the late stages of pregnancy, were crammed two to three in a wire cage. Kelli Bender, PEOPLE.com, "More than 80 Dogs, Including Days-Old Puppies, Rescued from Excrement-Caked Puppy Mill in Alabama," 10 July 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

The process might seem like a no-brainer — pack, transport, cram — but insiders say otherwise. Griffin Jackson, chicagotribune.com, "Self-storage is booming in big cities. 8 tips for doing it right.," 13 Sep. 2017 Gesicki and Smythe need the nightly cram sessions to digest Miami’s playbook. Omar Kelly, Sun-Sentinel.com, "Dolphins rookie tight ends Mike Gesicki, Durham Smythe cramming to play catch up," 11 June 2018 Those cram sessions are coming in the next few days for Nance, Clarkson, Osman and Zizic. Chris Fedor, cleveland.com, "How Larry Nance Jr. and Jordan Clarkson are approaching their first postseason appearance," 12 Apr. 2018 Maroth, 40, looks back on his 9-21 record 15 years ago — no one has lost 20 or more games since — as a cram session of life lessons. Stephen Ruiz, OrlandoSentinel.com, "Fire Frogs coach Mike Maroth embraces lessons from long-lost season with Detroit Tigers," 6 Apr. 2018 And it is backed to these mind-numbing continuing resolutions, omnibus nightmares, and shutdown threats, and the result is usually a last-minute budget-busting cram down. Fox News, "Ingraham: Washington's real March Madness," 21 Mar. 2018 During the interim, these young adults, known as ronin, will likely study at a cram school. Annabelle Timsit, The Atlantic, "Overhauling Japan's High-Stakes University-Admission System," 13 Jan. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cram.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of cram

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Noun

1810, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for cram

Verb

Middle English crammen, from Old English crammian; akin to Old Norse kremja to squeeze

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Dictionary Entries near cram

crake

crakeberry

crakow

cram

Cram

cramasie

Crambe

Statistics for cram

Last Updated

12 Jan 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for cram

The first known use of cram was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for cram

cram

verb

English Language Learners Definition of cram

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to fill (something) so that there is no room for anything else : to fill (something) completely

: to push or force (someone or something) into a space that is tight or crowded

: to push or force yourself into a space that is tight or crowded

cram

noun

English Language Learners Definition of cram (Entry 2 of 2)

: a quick period of study in order to learn a lot of information quickly for a test, exam, etc.

cram

verb
\ ˈkram \
crammed; cramming

Kids Definition of cram

1 : to stuff or pack tightly … oh, the joy of being able to cram large pieces of something sweet … into one's mouth!— Roald Dahl, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory
2 : to fill full I crammed my suitcase with clothes.
3 : to study hard just before a test

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More from Merriam-Webster on cram

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with cram

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for cram

Spanish Central: Translation of cram

Nglish: Translation of cram for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of cram for Arabic Speakers

Comments on cram

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