cram

verb
\ ˈkram How to pronounce cram (audio) \
crammed; cramming

Definition of cram

 (Entry 1 of 4)

transitive verb

1 : to pack tight : jam cram a suitcase with clothes a novel crammed with surprises
2a : to fill with food to satiety : stuff
b : to eat voraciously : bolt the child crams her food
3 : to thrust in or as if in a rough or forceful manner crammed the letters into his pocket
4 : to prepare hastily for an examination cram the students for the test

intransitive verb

1 : to eat greedily or to satiety : stuff
2 : to study a subject intensively especially for an imminent examination

cram

noun

Definition of cram (Entry 2 of 4)

1 : a compressed multitude or crowd : crush
2 : last-minute study especially for an examination

Cram

biographical name (1)
\ ˈkram How to pronounce Cram (audio) \

Definition of Cram (Entry 3 of 4)

Donald James 1919–2001 American chemist

Cram

biographical name (2)

Definition of Cram (Entry 4 of 4)

Ralph Adams 1863–1942 American architect and author

Keep scrolling for more

Other Words from cram

Verb

crammer noun

Synonyms for cram

Synonyms: Verb

crowd, crush, jam, ram, sandwich, shoehorn, squeeze, stuff, wedge

Synonyms: Noun

army, bike [chiefly Scottish], crowd, crush, drove, flock, herd, horde, host, legion, mass, mob, multitude, press, rout, scrum, swarm, throng

Visit the Thesaurus for More 

Examples of cram in a Sentence

Verb

He crammed the suitcase with his clothes. Before the trip I crammed my head with information about Spain.

Noun

battling the rush-hour cram in the subway
See More

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Dropping the APs takes pointless pressure off not only students—who would cram for the tests only to forget the material the day after—but overstressed teachers as well. Caitlin Macy, WSJ, "AP Tests Are Still a Great American Equalizer," 22 Feb. 2019 And the beds are not just for urbanites crammed in Manhattan walk-ups: Resource Furniture has shipped the foldaway berths to 34 states in 2018. Kathryn O’shea-evans, WSJ, "Murphy Beds: The Old-School Space Saver Is Back in Style," 27 Dec. 2018 That gives the newest Titan fewer total CUDA cores than its predecessor—the Titan V crammed in 5,120—but the Turing GPU’s CUDA cores are much more effective than the ones inside older Pascal GPUs. Brad Chacos, PCWorld, "Meet T-Rex: Nvidia's Titan RTX is the new graphics card mega-monster," 3 Dec. 2018 The able-bodied men will cram in toward the back of the trailer. Liliana Frankel, Teen Vogue, "A Day in the Life of the Migrant Caravan," 16 Nov. 2018 Like to spend your days cramming in as much museum hopping and sightseeing as possible? Condé Nast Traveler, "Two Super-Travelers on Everywhere They Went While Pregnant," 5 Nov. 2018 The columns are a product of a process called jamming, which crams loose objects (like gravel) together in a specific formation that makes them behave like a solid. Liz Stinson, Curbed, "Watch a robot build columns out of only gravel and string," 15 Oct. 2018 Those caveats aside, waking up early and heading out on the bike is almost always better than trying to cram in that lunch ride or knock out a few miles before sunset. Eben Weiss, Outside Online, "The Case for Riding Ultra Early in the Morning," 23 May 2018 The original trains weren’t designed for passengers — the compact carriages were crammed with only bulging mail sacks — so the natty cars were built to fit their role as a ride. John Lee, latimes.com, "Underground London well beyond the Tube holds secrets and delights," 25 Mar. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

More than seven million commuters a day cram onto the city’s existing creaky suburban railway network. Corinne Abrams, WSJ, "‘You Have to Actually Cut Open Mumbai’s Belly’—Inside One of the World’s Most Audacious Transit Projects," 6 Jan. 2019 Henna tattoo designs for brides, village cooking, spiritual gurus and Indian engineering-school entrance-exam cram courses are new genres that are thriving. Eric Bellman, WSJ, "Indians Are Binge-Watching Mobile Videos, Pushing YouTube, Others to Innovate," 21 Jan. 2019 The process might seem like a no-brainer — pack, transport, cram — but insiders say otherwise. Griffin Jackson, chicagotribune.com, "Self-storage is booming in big cities. 8 tips for doing it right.," 13 Sep. 2017 Gesicki and Smythe need the nightly cram sessions to digest Miami’s playbook. Omar Kelly, Sun-Sentinel.com, "Dolphins rookie tight ends Mike Gesicki, Durham Smythe cramming to play catch up," 11 June 2018 Those cram sessions are coming in the next few days for Nance, Clarkson, Osman and Zizic. Chris Fedor, cleveland.com, "How Larry Nance Jr. and Jordan Clarkson are approaching their first postseason appearance," 12 Apr. 2018 Maroth, 40, looks back on his 9-21 record 15 years ago — no one has lost 20 or more games since — as a cram session of life lessons. Stephen Ruiz, OrlandoSentinel.com, "Fire Frogs coach Mike Maroth embraces lessons from long-lost season with Detroit Tigers," 6 Apr. 2018 And it is backed to these mind-numbing continuing resolutions, omnibus nightmares, and shutdown threats, and the result is usually a last-minute budget-busting cram down. Fox News, "Ingraham: Washington's real March Madness," 21 Mar. 2018 During the interim, these young adults, known as ronin, will likely study at a cram school. Annabelle Timsit, The Atlantic, "Overhauling Japan's High-Stakes University-Admission System," 13 Jan. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cram.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of cram

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Noun

1810, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for cram

Verb

Middle English crammen, from Old English crammian; akin to Old Norse kremja to squeeze

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about cram

Dictionary Entries near cram

crake

crakeberry

crakow

cram

Cram

cramasie

Crambe

Statistics for cram

Last Updated

9 Mar 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for cram

The first known use of cram was before the 12th century

See more words from the same century

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for cram

cram

verb

English Language Learners Definition of cram

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to fill (something) so that there is no room for anything else : to fill (something) completely
: to push or force (someone or something) into a space that is tight or crowded
: to push or force yourself into a space that is tight or crowded

cram

noun

English Language Learners Definition of cram (Entry 2 of 2)

US : a quick period of study in order to learn a lot of information quickly for a test, exam, etc.

cram

verb
\ ˈkram How to pronounce cram (audio) \
crammed; cramming

Kids Definition of cram

1 : to stuff or pack tightly … oh, the joy of being able to cram large pieces of something sweet … into one's mouth!— Roald Dahl, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory
2 : to fill full I crammed my suitcase with clothes.
3 : to study hard just before a test

Keep scrolling for more

More from Merriam-Webster on cram

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with cram

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for cram

Spanish Central: Translation of cram

Nglish: Translation of cram for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of cram for Arabic Speakers

Comments on cram

What made you want to look up cram? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

the way words of a language are spelled

Get Word of the Day daily email!

Test Your Vocabulary

A Green Quiz

  • shamrock
  • What is the best definition of green-eyed monster?
Spell It

Can you spell these 10 commonly misspelled words?

TAKE THE QUIZ
SCRABBLE® Sprint

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ

Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!