cool

adjective
\ ˈkül How to pronounce cool (audio) \

Definition of cool

 (Entry 1 of 4)

1 : moderately cold : lacking in warmth The plant grows best in cool climates.
2a : marked by steady dispassionate calmness and self-control a cool and calculating businessperson
b : lacking ardor or friendliness a cool impersonal manner
c of jazz : marked by restrained emotion and the frequent use of counterpoint
d : free from tensions or violence We used to fight, but we're cool now.
3 used as an intensive a cool million dollars
4 : marked by deliberate effrontery or lack of due respect or discretion a cool reply
5 : facilitating or suggesting relief from heat a cool dress
6a of a color : producing an impression of being cool specifically : of a hue in the range violet through blue to green
b of a musical tone : relatively lacking in timbre or resonance (see resonance sense 2a)
7 informal
a : very good : excellent That was a really cool movie. also : all right Is getting together Friday night cool with you?
b : fashionable, hip … not happy with the new shoes … because they were not "cool."— Celestine Sibley

cool

verb
cooled; cooling; cools

Definition of cool (Entry 2 of 4)

intransitive verb

1 : to become cool : lose heat or warmth placed the pie in the window to cool sometimes used with off or down
2 : to lose ardor or passion His anger cooled.

transitive verb

1 : to make cool : impart a feeling of coolness to cooled the room with a fan often used with off or down A swim cooled us off a little.
2a : to moderate the heat, excitement, or force of : calm cooled her growing anger
b : to slow or lessen the growth or activity of usually used with off or down wants to cool off the economy without freezing itNewsweek
cool it
: to calm down : go easy The word went out to the young to cool it.— W. M. Young
cool one's heels
: to wait or be kept waiting for a long time especially from or as if from disdain or discourtesy

cool

noun

Definition of cool (Entry 3 of 4)

1 : a cool time, place, or situation the cool of the evening
2a : absence of excitement or emotional involvement : detachment … must surrender his fine cool and enter the closed crazy world of suicide …— Wilfrid Sheed
b : poise, composure The player lost his cool and began yelling at the referee.
3 : hipness

cool

adverb

Definition of cool (Entry 4 of 4)

: in a casual and nonchalant manner play it cool

Keep scrolling for more

Other Words from cool

Adjective

coolish \ ˈkü-​lish How to pronounce cool (audio) \ adjective
coolly or less commonly cooly \ ˈkü(l)-​lē How to pronounce cool (audio) \ adverb
coolness \ ˈkül-​nəs How to pronounce cool (audio) \ noun

Choose the Right Synonym for cool

Adjective

cool, composed, collected, unruffled, imperturbable, nonchalant mean free from agitation or excitement. cool may imply calmness, deliberateness, or dispassionateness. kept a cool head composed implies freedom from agitation as a result of self-discipline or a sedate disposition. the composed pianist gave a flawless concert collected implies a concentration of mind that eliminates distractions especially in moments of crisis. the nurse stayed calm and collected unruffled suggests apparent serenity and poise in the face of setbacks or in the midst of excitement. harried but unruffled imperturbable implies coolness or assurance even under severe provocation. the speaker remained imperturbable despite the heckling nonchalant stresses an easy coolness of manner or casualness that suggests indifference or unconcern. a nonchalant driver

Examples of cool in a Sentence

Adjective The weather is cool today. The surface is cool to the touch. The plant grows best in cool climates. I'm feeling a little cool. We changed into some cooler clothes. She remained calm, cool, and collected. Verb The fan cools the engine. the cooling effect of the breeze Allow the cake to cool before slicing. the cooling of the ocean waters I took a break from the discussion to allow my anger to cool. His interest in her has cooled somewhat. Noun the judge's customary cool stood him in good stead during the sensational trial I envy you your cool. Adverb Here comes Mom. Act cool and she won't suspect a thing.
See More
Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective In some cases, managed retreat may involve building denser, more affordable housing that’s designed to stay cool, while leaving open spaces for recreation or agriculture that can also reduce heat and absorb stormwater when needed. Katharine Mach, The Conversation, 16 July 2021 To stay cool internally, trees rely on water flowing through their trunks and limbs and evaporating in their leaves. oregonlive, 14 July 2021 Quaffing a few beers also helps stay cool in the yard, as patrons listen to music and watch planes come in and out. Marc Bona, cleveland, 12 July 2021 Enel, Repsol and Enbridge alone raised almost $7 billion from such bonds last month, as demand heated up from investors determined to try to help the global climate stay cool and gain good returns. Paul J. Davies, WSJ, 6 July 2021 Some attendees sat sprawled under the shade of wide leafy trees, while others tried to stay cool under rows of white tents that billowed like sails. NBC News, 3 July 2021 Temperatures are reaching record highs in some parts of the world, which means a portable air conditioner might be your saving grace to stay cool. Carly Kulzer, PEOPLE.com, 3 July 2021 Sunday any showers will be more scattered, and the temperatures won’t be so cool. courant.com, 2 July 2021 Stay cool with loose midi dresses, lightweight shorts, cooling bras, and more—all available on Amazon. Sanah Faroke, Southern Living, 1 July 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb On the tour, cool off in the caves, which stay below 70 degrees year-round. Patrick Connolly, orlandosentinel.com, 20 July 2021 Now all those popular GH characters can cool themselves off after getting hot over a new lover (or an old foil). Lynette Rice, EW.com, 19 July 2021 Many visitors would rather just cool off or wait for smoky haze from forest fires to lift, rather than brave slopes of the surrounding peaks in unusually high heat and limited visibility. Washington Post, 18 July 2021 Moreover, a crypto price crash would cool the current frenzy for digital-currency loans. Alexander Osipovich, WSJ, 17 July 2021 Daytime temperatures cool down to the 80s with evenings in the 60s, so October is a great time for swimming pools, al fresco dining, and outdoor activities. Patricia Doherty, Travel + Leisure, 13 July 2021 Moist air holds the heat of the day and can’t cool off as fast, which is why our nights are getting warm so quickly, too. BostonGlobe.com, 12 July 2021 But those chillers only cool the permafrost directly below the pipeline, which holds the supports. NBC News, 11 July 2021 Las Vegas should cool to 100 to 110, which is close to the 104-degree average for this time of year. Kate Mabus, USA TODAY, 11 July 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The video jumps to President Barack Obama, seated at an event but rising with ineffable cool and starting to dance. Piper Kerman, Washington Post, 22 July 2021 Thunderstorm chances Monday evening through Tuesday could delay the cool down, but the weather is expected to remain the same Tuesday. Amy Huschka, Detroit Free Press, 5 July 2021 The development in the Phoenix area retains more heat and does not allow for much cool-off within the city, unlike in desert and forested areas. Olivia Munson, The Arizona Republic, 2 July 2021 The stand-up fan has received over 6,900 perfect ratings from shoppers, while the now-$35 cool-to-the-touch bedding has racked up 67,000 five-star ratings. Jessica Leigh Mattern, PEOPLE.com, 2 July 2021 Dolberg displayed rather more Danish cool, simply lifting his arms to the sky in a statuesque style, repeating his celebration from his time as an Ajax player. Samindra Kunti, Forbes, 26 June 2021 Because of this sudden flip from a cool to an extended warm phase, cloud cover over the ocean dwindled, allowing the Pacific Ocean to absorb more solar radiation. Rachel Ramirez, CNN, 17 June 2021 After a warm start to the week with highs in the 80s, expect a cool down to start the holiday weekend, according to the National Weather Service. Kori Rumore, chicagotribune.com, 24 May 2021 These were nestled among bottles of mineral water and inedible frozen blue oblongs of gel whose purpose was to prolong the cool within. Hermione Hoby, Harper's Magazine, 22 June 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Adverb The Next Generation and Captain Jean-Luc Picard—stately, cool-headed, the guy who gets things done. Lauren Smiley, Wired, 22 June 2021 That’s not the only cool-looking anime to hit Netflix in March. Erik Kain, Forbes, 24 Feb. 2021 Remove from the heat, stir in the remaining parsley, and let cool before stirring in the Parmesan, if using. Washington Post, 27 May 2021 See more cool-looking fire pits and fire tables such as the Prism Hardscapes Tavola VI gas fire table made of glass fiber reinforced cement at Woodland Direct. oregonlive, 4 May 2021 The founder of the agency bought it, lofted it for some cool-looking meeting spaces, and moved in his people. David Rock, Forbes, 26 Apr. 2021 China's Civil Affairs Bureau has made clear the new cool-off period would not apply to divorce lawsuits that involve domestic violence. NBC News, 27 Mar. 2021 But that doesn’t mean there aren’t some cool-looking campers out there. Bryan Hood, Robb Report, 26 Mar. 2021 On stage, SiR was cool personified, taking a few hits of some smoke handed to him by a fan, and singing effortlessly. Hank Shteamer, Rolling Stone, 10 Mar. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cool.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of cool

Adjective

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Adverb

1968, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for cool

Adjective

Middle English col, going back to Old English cōl, going back to West Germanic *kōlu- (whence also Middle Dutch coele "moderately cold" and, from a variant *kōlja-, Old High German kuoli), lengthened-grade derivative from the base of *kalan- "to be cold" — more at cold entry 1

Verb

Middle English colen, going back to Old English cōlian, verbal derivative from Germanic *kōl- cool entry 1 (whence also Old Saxon colon "to become cool," Old High German kuolēn)

Noun

Middle English cole, derivative of col cool entry 1

Adverb

derivative of cool entry 1

Keep scrolling for more

Buying Guide

Our team at The Usage has selected the best refrigerators of 2021.

Learn More About cool

Time Traveler for cool

Time Traveler

The first known use of cool was before the 12th century

See more words from the same century

Dictionary Entries Near cool

cook wrasse

cool

coolabah

See More Nearby Entries 

Statistics for cool

Last Updated

23 Jul 2021

Cite this Entry

“Cool.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/cool. Accessed 30 Jul. 2021.

Style: MLA
MLACheck Mark Icon ChicagoCheck Mark Icon APACheck Mark Icon Merriam-WebsterCheck Mark Icon

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for cool

cool

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of cool

 (Entry 1 of 3)

: somewhat cold : not warm or hot
: made of a light, thin material that helps you stay cool
: able to think and act in a calm way : not affected by strong feelings

cool

verb

English Language Learners Definition of cool (Entry 2 of 3)

: to make (someone or something) cool
: to become cool : to lose heat or warmth
: to become less strong or intense especially in emotion

cool

adverb

English Language Learners Definition of cool (Entry 3 of 3)

informal : in a calm manner : in a way that does not seem unusual or excited

cool

adjective
\ ˈkül How to pronounce cool (audio) \
cooler; coolest

Kids Definition of cool

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1 : somewhat cold : not warm a cool day a cool room
2 : not letting or keeping in heat cool clothes
3 : calm entry 3 sense 2 She is cool in a crisis.
4 : not interested or friendly He was cool to my idea.
5 : fashionable, stylish, or attractive in a way that is widely approved of
6 : very good excellent

Other Words from cool

coolly adverb
coolness noun

cool

verb
cooled; cooling

Kids Definition of cool (Entry 2 of 3)

: to make or become less warm

cool

noun

Kids Definition of cool (Entry 3 of 3)

1 : a time or place that is not warm the cool of the evening
2 : a calm state of mind Keep your cool.

cool

intransitive verb

Legal Definition of cool

: to lose passion : become calm sometimes used with off or down the time elapsing…is such that a reasonable man thus provoked would have cooled— W. R. LaFave and A. W. Scott, Jr.

More from Merriam-Webster on cool

Nglish: Translation of cool for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of cool for Arabic Speakers

WORD OF THE DAY

Test Your Vocabulary

Difficult Spelling Words Quiz

  • alphabet pasta spelling help
  • Which is the correct spelling?
How Strong Is Your Vocabulary?

Test your vocabulary with our 10-question quiz!

TAKE THE QUIZ
Universal Daily Crossword

A daily challenge for crossword fanatics.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!