resonance

noun
res·​o·​nance | \ ˈre-zə-nən(t)s How to pronounce resonance (audio) , ˈrez-nən(t)s\

Definition of resonance

1a : the quality or state of being resonant
b(1) : a vibration of large amplitude in a mechanical or electrical system caused by a relatively small periodic stimulus of the same or nearly the same period as the natural vibration period of the system
(2) : the state of adjustment that produces resonance in a mechanical or electrical system
2a : the intensification and enriching of a musical tone by supplementary vibration
b : a quality imparted to voiced sounds by vibration in anatomical resonating chambers or cavities (such as the mouth or the nasal cavity)
c : a quality of richness or variety
d : a quality of evoking response how much resonance the scandal seems to be havingU.S. News & World Report
3 : the sound elicited on percussion of the chest
4 : the conceptual alternation of a chemical species (such as a molecule or ion) between two or more equivalent allowed structural representations differing only in the placement of electrons that aids in understanding the actual state of the species as an amalgamation of its possible structures and the usually higher-than-expected stability of the species
5a : the enhancement of an atomic, nuclear, or particle reaction or a scattering event by excitation of internal motion in the system
6 : an extremely short-lived elementary particle
7 : a synchronous gravitational relationship of two celestial bodies (such as moons) that orbit a third (such as a planet) which can be expressed as a simple ratio of their orbital periods

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Resonance Uses Beyond Sound

Many of the finest musical instruments possess a high degree of resonance which, by producing additional vibrations and echoes of the original sound, enriches and amplifies it. Violins made by the Italian masters Stradivari and Guarneri possess a quality of resonance that later violinmakers have never precisely duplicated. And you may have noticed how a particular note will start something in a room buzzing, as one of the touching surfaces begins to resonate with the note. Because of that, resonance and resonate—along with the adjective resonant—aren't always used to describe sound. For example, you may say that a novel resonates strongly with you because the author seems to be describing your own experiences and feelings.

Examples of resonance in a Sentence

the resonance of the singer's voice His story didn't have much resonance with the audience.

Recent Examples on the Web

Apollo’s eventual resurrection of the beautiful Hyacinth, who attained immortality, has wry resonance for an art museum. Christopher Knight, latimes.com, "MOCA on the rebound? Three strong shows and free entry are welcome signs of change," 12 June 2019 This concept has no resonance for the 2019 fashion design graduates from the Fashion Institute of Technology, Parsons School of Design at The New School, and the Pratt Institute. Vogue, "19 FIT, Pratt, and Parsons 2019 Graduates on Their Collections and the Future of Fashion," 22 May 2019 The impulse recordings for the Wooden Bowl Room and Cleveland Avenue showed low, sustained resonances that would be ideal to add depth and tension in sound design, according to Lysoivanov. Jennifer Ouellette, Ars Technica, "Cave acoustics can help sculpt more realistic sounds in digital space," 14 Nov. 2018 This divide is both long-running and global, but has particular resonance in Russia. The Economist, "Reformists and traditionalists are at war over Russian schools," 26 May 2018 Indeed, there's emotional resonance to many of Klinger's most elaborate technical choices, beginning with those alternating types of non-digital film. Guy Lodge, chicagotribune.com, "'Porto' review: Anton Yelchin stars in a film that's in love with love and cinema," 11 Jan. 2018 Sidney Crosby and Alexander Ovechkin may not be LeBron James and Stephen Curry, but their names have greater resonance than any luger who ever lived. Bernie Lincicome, chicagotribune.com, "NHL and Olympics never a match made in heaven," 9 Feb. 2018 This provided a unique resonance and helped suppress feedback but didn’t quite capture the essence of an acoustic guitar. Henry Robertson, Popular Mechanics, "Fender's 'Acoustasonic' Is a True Acoustic-Electric Hybrid Guitar," 22 Jan. 2019 Opening on Valentine’s Day in Sweden is a new film, Eld & Lågor (Swoon), that will have resonance for fashion folk even beyond the title. Laird Borrelli-persson, Vogue, "Frida Gustavsson on Her New Act—The Lead Role in the Swedish Film Swoon," 14 Feb. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'resonance.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of resonance

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for resonance

Middle English resonaunce, from Middle French resonance, from resoner to resound — more at resound

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Statistics for resonance

Last Updated

17 Jun 2019

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Time Traveler for resonance

The first known use of resonance was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for resonance

resonance

noun

English Language Learners Definition of resonance

formal : the quality of a sound that stays loud, clear, and deep for a long time
formal : a quality that makes something personally meaningful or important to someone
technical : a sound or vibration produced in one object that is caused by the sound or vibration produced in another

resonance

noun
res·​o·​nance | \ ˈre-zə-nəns How to pronounce resonance (audio) \

Kids Definition of resonance

: a long loud, clear, and deep quality of sound

resonance

noun
res·​o·​nance | \ ˈrez-ᵊn-ən(t)s, ˈrez-nən(t)s How to pronounce resonance (audio) \

Medical Definition of resonance

1 : a quality imparted to voiced sounds by vibration in anatomical resonating chambers or cavities (as the mouth or the nasal cavity)
2 : the sound elicited on percussion of the chest
3 : the conceptual alternation of a chemical species (as a molecule or ion) between two or more equivalent allowed structural representations differing only in the placement of electrons that aids in understanding the actual state of the species as an amalgamation of its possible structures and the usually higher-than-expected stability of the species
4a : the enhancement of an atomic, nuclear, or particle reaction or a scattering event by excitation of internal motion in the system

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More from Merriam-Webster on resonance

Spanish Central: Translation of resonance

Nglish: Translation of resonance for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of resonance for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about resonance

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