cool

adjective
\ ˈkül How to pronounce cool (audio) \

Definition of cool

 (Entry 1 of 4)

1 : moderately cold : lacking in warmth The plant grows best in cool climates.
2a : marked by steady dispassionate calmness and self-control a cool and calculating businessperson
b : lacking ardor or friendliness a cool impersonal manner
c of jazz : marked by restrained emotion and the frequent use of counterpoint
d : free from tensions or violence We used to fight, but we're cool now.
3 used as an intensive a cool million dollars
4 : marked by deliberate effrontery or lack of due respect or discretion a cool reply
5 : facilitating or suggesting relief from heat a cool dress
6a of a color : producing an impression of being cool specifically : of a hue in the range violet through blue to green
b of a musical tone : relatively lacking in timbre or resonance (see resonance sense 2a)
7 informal
a : very good : excellent That was a really cool movie. also : all right Is getting together Friday night cool with you?
b : fashionable, hip … not happy with the new shoes … because they were not "cool."— Celestine Sibley

cool

verb
cooled; cooling; cools

Definition of cool (Entry 2 of 4)

intransitive verb

1 : to become cool : lose heat or warmth placed the pie in the window to cool sometimes used with off or down
2 : to lose ardor or passion His anger cooled.

transitive verb

1 : to make cool : impart a feeling of coolness to cooled the room with a fan often used with off or down A swim cooled us off a little.
2a : to moderate the heat, excitement, or force of : calm cooled her growing anger
b : to slow or lessen the growth or activity of usually used with off or down wants to cool off the economy without freezing itNewsweek
cool it
: to calm down : go easy The word went out to the young to cool it.— W. M. Young
cool one's heels
: to wait or be kept waiting for a long time especially from or as if from disdain or discourtesy

cool

noun

Definition of cool (Entry 3 of 4)

1 : a cool time, place, or situation the cool of the evening
2a : absence of excitement or emotional involvement : detachment … must surrender his fine cool and enter the closed crazy world of suicide …— Wilfrid Sheed
b : poise, composure The player lost his cool and began yelling at the referee.
3 : hipness

cool

adverb

Definition of cool (Entry 4 of 4)

: in a casual and nonchalant manner play it cool

Other Words from cool

Adjective

coolish \ ˈkü-​lish How to pronounce cool (audio) \ adjective
coolly or less commonly cooly \ ˈkü(l)-​lē How to pronounce cool (audio) \ adverb
coolness \ ˈkül-​nəs How to pronounce cool (audio) \ noun

Choose the Right Synonym for cool

Adjective

cool, composed, collected, unruffled, imperturbable, nonchalant mean free from agitation or excitement. cool may imply calmness, deliberateness, or dispassionateness. kept a cool head composed implies freedom from agitation as a result of self-discipline or a sedate disposition. the composed pianist gave a flawless concert collected implies a concentration of mind that eliminates distractions especially in moments of crisis. the nurse stayed calm and collected unruffled suggests apparent serenity and poise in the face of setbacks or in the midst of excitement. harried but unruffled imperturbable implies coolness or assurance even under severe provocation. the speaker remained imperturbable despite the heckling nonchalant stresses an easy coolness of manner or casualness that suggests indifference or unconcern. a nonchalant driver

Examples of cool in a Sentence

Adjective The weather is cool today. The surface is cool to the touch. The plant grows best in cool climates. I'm feeling a little cool. We changed into some cooler clothes. She remained calm, cool, and collected. Verb The fan cools the engine. the cooling effect of the breeze Allow the cake to cool before slicing. the cooling of the ocean waters I took a break from the discussion to allow my anger to cool. His interest in her has cooled somewhat. Noun had a cool new hairstyle I envy you your cool. Adverb Here comes Mom. Act cool and she won't suspect a thing. See More
Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective Nina Agdal keeps her cool during a walk in Los Angeles on Sept. 26. People Staff, Peoplemag, 30 Sep. 2022 Granted, those who can afford a $50-million home likely aren’t sweating a bloated electric bill, nor perhaps the carbon footprint, but experts say the cost of keeping a mansion cool can run well north of $10,000 per month. Jack Flemming, Los Angeles Times, 30 Sep. 2022 Old, retro video games are cool again, so your kids may want to chek in with the 45-minute adventure of this big, smiling Pac Man. Marisa Lascala, Good Housekeeping, 28 Sep. 2022 Keeping things hot, keeping things cool, reducing waste, and looking adorable — this stainless steel cat thermos does it all. Jamie Kravitz, Woman's Day, 26 Sep. 2022 During the winter, people still used the fridge for storage, as it was kept cool by the Chicago temperatures. Maddie Ellis, Chicago Tribune, 24 Sep. 2022 First, the solar panels are more efficient because the water below keeps them cool. Ian Mount, Fortune, 20 Sep. 2022 The hair dryer is even designed with specialized technology that keeps the attachments cool to the touch even while in use. Kylee Mcguigan, Popular Mechanics, 17 Sep. 2022 Optimize your bedroom by keeping it cool (around 65 degrees), painted in relaxing colors, dark, quiet, with no electronics and a bed that is comfortable and clean. Scott Lafee, San Diego Union-Tribune, 13 Sep. 2022 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Materials that passively heat or cool an environment can cut down on the demand for energy by handling some of these needs without requiring the use of energy. John Timmer, Ars Technica, 13 Sep. 2022 Russia’s war with Ukraine has hamstrung global energy supplies, while an extreme heat wave has bolstered energy demand from families that need to cool their homes. Caitlin Ostroff, WSJ, 12 Sep. 2022 The organization urged residents to set their thermostats to 78 degrees, turn off lights when not being used, unplug unused electronics and to pre-cool their homes earlier in the day. Teddy Grant, ABC News, 6 Sep. 2022 People are requested to pre-cool their homes to minimize air conditioning use during those critical hours, and use major appliances such as the dryer and dishwasher in the morning. Jessica Flores, San Francisco Chronicle, 6 Sep. 2022 The operator asked residents to pre-cool their homes before 4 p.m. Nouran Salahieh, CNN, 4 Sep. 2022 That includes energy-efficient electric heat pumps, which both heat and cool a home. Jasmina Burek, The Conversation, 1 Sep. 2022 As amazing as the natural atmosphere of the planet is, most people still need energy to heat and cool their homes and workplaces. Khalid Parekh, Forbes, 17 Aug. 2022 On the hottest of summer days, trees can help cool our homes and streets and shelter us from ultraviolet rays. Los Angeles Times, 2 Aug. 2022 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The cool-to-the-touch cover was popular among hot sleepers. Emma Seymour, Good Housekeeping, 12 Aug. 2022 Formerly plastic parts such as the column stalks and heater controls (even the ignition key) are replaced by cool-to-the touch aluminum. Tim Pitt, Robb Report, 9 Aug. 2022 It's made with Outdoor Voices' TechSweat, which results in a cool-to-the-touch fabric designed to mold to your shape. Daisy Maldonado, SELF, 7 Aug. 2022 The Purple Harmony pillow stood out during our tests for its cool-to-the-touch design and its surprising texture. Samantha Jones, Better Homes & Gardens, 31 May 2022 Manning recalls a staff meeting at which Compton seemed to lose his cool. Ed Masley, The Arizona Republic, 10 Aug. 2022 And which keeps its cool until the very end, where sweetness overwhelms the comic cynicism on which the whole film has been built. John Anderson, WSJ, 28 July 2022 For who embodies a certain brand of slick, leading-man cool better than Michael Douglas, from his role as a rugged dreamboat adventurer in Romancing the Stone to his oh-so-’90s taupe Cerruti suits in Basic Instinct? Liam Hess, Vogue, 19 Aug. 2022 Anine Bing is known for designing wardrobe essentials — like this Los Angeles T-shirt — which effortlessly exude West Coast cool. Samantha Lawyer, Woman's Day, 17 Aug. 2022 Recent Examples on the Web: Adverb The worst part, though, is that there’s no real way to have a cool-looking character in Path of Exile without forking over cash. Aaron Zimmerman, Ars Technica, 2 Sep. 2022 Thursday is the premiere date of a cool-sounding Cold War thriller from Britain. Globe Staff, BostonGlobe.com, 16 May 2022 It’s not just a cool-sounding name drummed up by marketers around a whiteboard. Sean Evans, Robb Report, 26 Jan. 2022 The crowd’s size and cooperative attitude in keeping itself cool seemed a throwback to the biggest, best rock-outs of the ‘60s. Merrie Monteagudo, San Diego Union-Tribune, 6 Sep. 2022 As would putting a cool-colored foundation on Claire Danes’s fair but warm-toned skin. Laura Scholz, SELF, 2 Sep. 2022 The band played over 120 shows, broke big on college radio, and made their television debut on Late Night with David Letterman — and Murmur began traveling from dorm room to dorm room, from cool older sibling to younger sibling. Al Shipley, SPIN, 19 Aug. 2022 Consolidating parts can help systems heat and cool more uniformly. Benny Buller, Forbes, 8 Aug. 2022 The design, while cool-looking, doesn’t leave room for more knives. Rennie Dyball, Peoplemag, 8 Aug. 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cool.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of cool

Adjective

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Adverb

1968, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for cool

Adjective

Middle English col, going back to Old English cōl, going back to West Germanic *kōlu- (whence also Middle Dutch coele "moderately cold" and, from a variant *kōlja-, Old High German kuoli), lengthened-grade derivative from the base of *kalan- "to be cold" — more at cold entry 1

Verb

Middle English colen, going back to Old English cōlian, verbal derivative from Germanic *kōl- cool entry 1 (whence also Old Saxon colon "to become cool," Old High German kuolēn)

Noun

Middle English cole, derivative of col cool entry 1

Adverb

derivative of cool entry 1

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Time Traveler for cool

Time Traveler

The first known use of cool was before the 12th century

See more words from the same century

Dictionary Entries Near cool

cook wrasse

cool

coolabah

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Statistics for cool

Last Updated

3 Oct 2022

Cite this Entry

“Cool.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/cool. Accessed 3 Oct. 2022.

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More Definitions for cool

cool

adjective
\ ˈkül How to pronounce cool (audio) \
cooler; coolest

Kids Definition of cool

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1 : somewhat cold : not warm a cool day a cool room
2 : not letting or keeping in heat cool clothes
3 : calm entry 3 sense 2 She is cool in a crisis.
4 : not interested or friendly He was cool to my idea.
5 : fashionable, stylish, or attractive in a way that is widely approved of
6 : very good excellent

Other Words from cool

coolly adverb
coolness noun

cool

verb
cooled; cooling

Kids Definition of cool (Entry 2 of 3)

: to make or become less warm

cool

noun

Kids Definition of cool (Entry 3 of 3)

1 : a time or place that is not warm the cool of the evening
2 : a calm state of mind Keep your cool.

cool

intransitive verb

Legal Definition of cool

: to lose passion : become calm sometimes used with off or down the time elapsing…is such that a reasonable man thus provoked would have cooled— W. R. LaFave and A. W. Scott, Jr.

More from Merriam-Webster on cool

Nglish: Translation of cool for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of cool for Arabic Speakers

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